High Plains Morning

Weekdays from 9 am to noon CT

High Plains Morning is a long-standing tradition at HPPR.  A daily mix of singer-songwriters, folk, jazz, americana, world, reggae, bluegrass, rock and just about anything else that you can think of. Add news from NPR and regional weather reports at the top of each hour, and you have a great way to move your day along. 

Scroll down to view program playlists.

Who knew so many of the good people of Garden City would venture out on a Sunday night for a live jazz concert? 

HPPR would like to thank our honored guests, The Bob Bowman Trio from Kansas City, for their phenomenal concert on  March 6th. It was broadcast live on air from our Garden City studio in front of a live audience.  

This show was made possible by: Hicks Thomas LLC - A Texas energy and trial law firm.

You wouldn't think anyone's grandmother would take their grandchild into the woods to pluck a poisonous plant for a noonday snack.

However, today's edition of Growing on the High Plains takes me back to my childhood memories of foraging pokeweed, also known as pokeberry, inkberry, and Phytolacca americana.   

This potentially toxic foliage has applications ranging from succulent side dish to a berry-based dye to a handy home remedy.

 

We all have one: that list of  garden chores we scribbled down with good intentions.

It's that back-burner list that is far less pressing than the imminent "dig in the dirt" directives.

Though each year, some of those stagnant "to-do" items never seem to get "to-done." 

Today on Growing on the High Plains, I share my experiences with the daunting task of prioritizing what must be done and what can linger a little longer. 

Today's  installment of Growing on the High Plains  might feel a bit like an audio submission to the Antiques Roadshow, as I share with you the history of my prized collection of authentic McCoy pottery.

More than a century ago, Nelson McCoy  founded his famed stoneware company in Roseville, Ohio. The vessels were noted for their simple, utilitarian design, as well as their durable, high-quality construction. In fact, I can attest that these puppies are indeed resilient -- even in the face of a potential catastrophe.

Scroll down for some snapshots of my assembled assortment of antique McCoy planters. As you can see, they're almost as pretty as the plants they present.

Valentine's day is coming, and love is in the air. So today on Growing on the High Plains, I'll tell you about an enchanted, amorous bloom often referred to as "Love in a Mist." 

You know how that special someone makes you feel like you're walking on air? Likewise, these bright, ethereal blooms appear to levitate over a frothy, feathered bed of foliage.  But watch out! Like lovers, they'll grow thorny with time. Thankfully, like love, they're always worth the trouble.

To some people, a plant is a plant is a plant. But to the phytophilous (or plant-loving) High Plains gardener, identifying our native flora can often be as fun as tending their beds.

Today's installment of Growing on the High Plains compares two competing conventions.

First, we'll discuss the often-complex botanical naming system used to identify various species of plants. (Sometimes, it's all Latin to me.)

Next, I'll share a few of the delightful "common names" often used as shorthand when describing three of my favorite house plants.

“One of the best flatpickers anywhere.”

—The Huffington Post 

Beppe Gambetta - Live in Amarillo

Chalice Abbey ~ 2717 Stanley

Doors @ 7p  |  Show @ 7:30p

Sugg. donation: $15

***ALERT: This show is SOLD OUT. 

***To be put on the WAITING LIST,  call HPPR at 806.367.9088 with your NAME & PHONE #. ***

We've all seen them.

Those curious mirrored balls, perched among the pansies, gracing the gladiolas, and reflecting a fish-eye panorama of the garden in which it resides?

Well, these ocular orbs have a long history! On today's Growing on the High Plains, I'll round out your knowledge of these garden globes, including a personal story of how I acquired my own.  

You've probably seen these curious little creatures before—perhaps on the periphery at a plant shops, woven into an indoor "green wall," or possibly dangling from an overhead glass orb at a specialty gift boutique.

Quite alien in appearance, these tropical treasures are called tillandsias, but you might better know them as "air plants." 

Today's Growing on the High Plains continues our conversation about 2017 New Year's resolutions.

Last week, I discussed how "working the land" indeed encourages physical activity, which leads to overall fitness, flexibility, weight loss, and heart health -- all of which are excellent goals for the new year.

But that's not all! This week, I'll explain how the benefits of gardening also lead to a healthy mind. Lucky for us, making a commitment to getting our hands dirty  will help keep our memories cleanly intact. 

       LIVE IN AMARILLO!

Putnam Smith & Ashley Storrow
Friday, January 27th
 Chalice Abbey(2717 Stanley)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p
$15 Suggested Donation
RSVP online or call 806.367.9088!

 

 

 

As we embark on a New Year, it's hard to resist pondering the corrections we'd like to make moving forward. It's no surprise that "getting in shape" inevitably tops the list of most resolutions.

Regardless of whether or not “the white stuff” falls from above, High Plains holidays always seems to sprinkle in great memories and offer an extra scoop of seasonal splendor.

On today’s edition of Growing on the High Plains, I’ll take you back to a time that shaped my appreciation for this special time of the year. Tune in and travel back to a time of milkshakes, penny candy, and a drug store jukebox that played both Bing and The King. Snow or no, these are the remembrances that set the scene for my High Plains holiday.

Today's Growing on the High Plains reflects on an annual event that, for many of us, marks the start of the holiday season: the inevitable expedition to select the season's centerpiece.

While it's easy to take the Christmas tree tradition as a December given, those who make a living farming and growing these festively-functional forests know the work is anything but seasonal.

Learn more about the year-round tilling and toil that goes into nurturing your treasured tannenbaum. 

I've been walkin' on the railroad...and it's not what you would expect!

Did you know that, in cities across the world, out-of-use elevated freight rail lines have been resurrected as rustic gardens and public parks? It's true! From Paris to Chicago to New York City, defunct industrial corridors have made for quite the elysian green spaces. 

It's autumn, so what better time to take a walk through a garden within a garden within a garden?

On today's installment of Growing on the High Plains, I'll zip you off to the Big Apple so we can explore the many wonders of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden—an incredible space that features phenomenal themed gardens, diverse pavilions, an eco-center, educational classes, and shade trees that seem to spread out as wide as our region's prairies.

Happy Thanksgiving  to all of our HPPR listeners!

To mark the holiday, I'm shaking free a few loose memories from beneath the pecan trees of my past. They say this holiday is all about reflecting on our blessings and spending time with family -- even if a few of our relations can be a little nuts.

Enjoy this Thanksgiving edition of Growing on the High Plains, and I wish you all a peaceful meal full of bounty and gratitude...and a big slice of pecan pie! 

UPDATED CONCERT SCHEDULE!

Please mark your calendars! We may have lost Tia McGraff, but we gained The Dustjackets in two cities. 

Thank you for supporting live music on the High Plains!

On today's episode of Growing on the High Plains, mum's the word. (I'm talking about the flower, of course.)

Ask any gardener in our region and you're likely to hear a chorus of praise for the chrysanthemum. They're colorful, hearty, elegant, and resilient -- a real High Plains hero. But mid-November is a bit of a crossroads for these favorites, so learn how you can reuse and rescue today's mums for tomorrow's garden.  

While home gardening has certainly seen a rich resurgence in recent years, planting food crops for the purposes of conserving and preserving dates back to a time of meager means.  

Today on Growing on the High Plains, I'll share some history and context regarding the American "victory garden." Self-sufficient citizens that planted and maintained food plots helped supplement shortages in a time of war. Nurturing fresh food for the troops (and the family table) provided a sense of service, pride, and community.  

Bettman & Halpin

Live in Amarillo: Friday, November 18th
Doors @ 7p ~ Show @ 7:30p
Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley St. ~ Off Georgia, Near Wolflin)
$15 Suggested Donation

Please let us know you're coming!
You can RSVP online, or call 806.367.9088.

Finding enough space for a hearty garden is not a problem you would think affects most of us on the High Plains. However, gardeners all over the world have become increasingly adept at creating a manageable growing space in a compact area.

Today's installment of Growing on the High Plains looks at one smart solution: straw bale gardens. They're raised, tidy, hospitable to seeds, and can yield a spectacular crop with care and attention. 

Have you ever wanted s'more information about the origin of those squishy, sweet puffs we all take for granted around the campfire?  

Today's Growing on the High Plains peeps at the ancient origin of the marshmallow, and it's hiding in plain sight. Join us as we tap the root of the "mallow plant," commonly found around marshy wetlands. 

From mucilaginous medicine to confection perfection, this treacly treat goes WAY back -- and the story of its cultivation is more than just fluff.

Some people just don't know when to quit -- and for that, HPPR is thankful.

With more than 100 head of grass-fed cattle on his family farm in Buffalo, Missouri, you'd think Lyal Strickland wouldn't be tooling around the country with his guitar. However, you'd be incorrect. This guy loves pushing the logical boundaries of how much HARD WORK a human can handle, and then handle it all, he does.

This week's edition of Growing on the High Plains features a regional bird of paradise that's both easy to maintain and brilliant when in bloom: the bromeliad. With minor maintenance, this sturdy plant will continue to grow, gracing your garden with its glory. So it's a lot like public radio! Please help HPPR continue to "pretty up" your days on the High Plains. Donate today during our Fall Membership Drive.  

Don't miss a phenomenal DOUBLE CONCERT for guitar lovers across the High Plains! Two GUITAR MASTERS perform at HPPR Studios in Garden City, KS on Friday, November 4th at 7pm. 

Hiroya Tsukamoto and

Adam Gardino, with special guest Kelly Champlin.

Click here to RSVP online or call 806.367.9088.

Today's edition of Growing on the High Plains asks you to hearken to our High Plains history as we ponder the lot of early pioneers, especially what harvest time meant to them. 

Like our forefathers who settled this land, so must we all pitch in to ensure a bounty when it's needed. (Just ask the Little Red Hen!) Today, we ask YOU to take a moment and consider what it is that you reap from HPPR's programming.

Called “the best kind of singer-songwriter” by the Dallas Observer, Vanessa Peters has played more than 1,100 shows in 11 countries and has independently released ten critically acclaimed albums. She tours the US and much of Europe, where she has a strong fan base thanks to the albums she made with her former Italian band, Ice Cream on Mondays. (It's because in Italy, all the gelaterias are closed on Monday -- and Vanessa struggled. Oh, she struggled.) 

FASO is thrilled to present internationally celebrated concert violinist, Rachel Barton Pine for the 2nd concert in the Friends of Aeolian-Skinner Opus 1024 (FASO)'s 2016-2017 Concert Season on Sunday, October 16!

Concerts are held at Saint Andrew's Episcopal Church, (1601 Georgia St., Amarillo, TX). 

This week's installment of Growing on the High Plains provides an inside scoop on how best to beckon bashful butterflies to your High Plains garden. 

  From deadheading your branching mums to seizing (rather than sneezing) rods of gold, these well-worn pointers will ensure an influx of "flying flowers" to your all-you-can-eat growing space.  Learn what to plant and how to prune so that you'll optimize unannounced visits from thirsty nectar collectors.   

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