High Plains Morning

Weekdays from 9 am to noon CT

High Plains Morning is a long-standing tradition at HPPR. A daily mix of singer-songwriters, folk, jazz, Americana, world, reggae, bluegrass, rock and just about anything else that you can think of. Add a few live in-studio performances, interviews with community partners, and news from NPR + regional weather at the top of every hour, and you have a great way to move through your morning!

If you'd like to submit music for consideration, please mail a CD and one-sheet to: Jenny Inzerillo, Music Director, High Plains Public Radio, 104 SW 6th Ave., Suite B4, Amarillo, TX, 79101. (Please allow one month for processing, and then feel free to check the status of your submission by emailing music@hppr.org.)

Scroll down to view program playlists.

Are you a good witch or a bad witch?

Today on High Plains Morning, we had Scott Stine live in the studio to talk about the Bad Magik Musik Fest that takes over Sam Houston Park this SATURDAY from noon to 9p. It's famliy-friendly, dog-welcoming, and features community-minded local vendors, artists, food, and fun.

High Plains Morning was thrilled to welcome guitar instructor Homero Campos of Amarillo College and his students to play LIVE in the studio. 

First, we lined up the Suzuki Guitar Ensemble, with student ranging from age 8 to 16. These kids learn to play by ear, then they learn to read music. It's called the "mother tongue" approach, treating the music like a new language.

The students played three tunes: 

Meadow Minuet by Frank Longay

All my Loving by The Beatles

Since HPPR loves hosting brilliant artists who live in a van...don't miss HPPR's Living Room Concert Series as we present North Carolina's own folk-country dynamos, NIKKI TALLEY & JASON SHARP!

Saturday, June 17th.

Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley, Amarillo)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested donation: $15

-----------------------------------------

ALL RIGHT, High Plains! HPPR is thrilled to be hosting CARTER SAMPSON, live in Garden City, KS as part of HPPR's Living Room Concert Series. 

Wednesday, June 14th

HPPR Studios - Garden City (210 N. 7th St.)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested donation: $15

-----------------------------------------

On today's Growing on the High Plains, we'll discuss one of my favorite -- and fleeting -- garden guests: English peas. 

When young, they're tender and refined, boasting a fresh sweetness few vegetables can match. (And in our house, given that they're one of my husband's most anticipated arrivals, they never last long.) 

Growing peas on the High Plains can be a bit tricky, but if you follow these pointers, you'll have a light crop of these pretty pods at your nimble fingertips each year.

With the first of May arriving this week, I thought it an apt time to pause and reflect on the historical traditions associated with the special day. From a Red Square affair to a celebration of weather fair, May Day has been associated with a variety of rites and rituals.

High Plains Public Radio is thrilled to present THREE AMAZING FOLK MUSICIANS, live at the HPPR Studio - Amarillo (104 SW 6th Ave., Basement). 

This exclusive, first-ever pop-up showcase features three Oklahoma-based folk singers: LEVI PARHAM, LAUREN BARTH, & JESSE AYCOCK!

HAPPY HOUR! Tuesday, May 9TH ~ 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM CDT ~ HPPR Studios – Amarillo (104 SW 6th Ave., Basement)

Suggested donation: $15.

CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER

SATURDAY NIGHT, 4/29! LIVE IN GARDEN CITY!

Don't miss the Band of Lovers, live in Garden City on Saturday, April 29th at HPPR Studios – Garden City! They're touring their NEW ALBUM, so come out and hear the new tunes!

CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

To conclude our three-part series on how gardeners new to our region can overcome reduced water access, today's installment of Growing on the High Plains goes underground -- literally. 

In addition to thoughtful xeriscaping and maximizing moisture with mulch, those committed to making water conservation a top priority can consider planning and installing a drip system.  With the flip of a switch, you can ensure that every drop goes  where it's needed -- saving time and energy.

HPPR Living Room Concerts presents

Gabrielle Louise - Live in Concert

Chalice Abbey, Amarillo

(2717 Stanley Street)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested Donation: $15

Hosted by Chalice Abbey & Evocation Coffee

------------------------------------------------------------

Gabrielle Louise is a nationally-touring, Colorado-based troubadour noted for her poignant lyrics and lush voice. The daughter of two vagabond musicians, Gabrielle inherited the predisposition to wanderlust and song. 

You might remember that last week we reviewed important insider intel' about how to keep High Plains gardens growing without wasting water.

Today’s installment of Growing on the High Plains continues this topic, so as not to leave anyone high and dry when it comes to best practices regarding conservation.  

For those of us thirsty for tips and reminders about how we can make the most of our gardens on the High Plains, today's show will be of special interest.

Join me as I revisit the importance of planting and prepping to make the most of every drop of water -- whether it comes from our watering can or our big sky above.

You might have noticed that community gardening has grown in popularity across the High Plains and the nation in recent years. Home gardeners often feel that coming together with others to nurture shared spaces to benefit one's own community gets at the root of why we love to grow, harvest, and share the bounty. 

Impatient for impatients? Vying for violets? Coveting lovage? Eager for leeks? Looking forward to a forage? Hurtin' for dirt? 

The HPPR Living Room Concert Series is pleased to present: TERRI HENDRIX & LLOYD MAINES, live in Amarillo on Earth Day!

Saturday, April 22nd

Chamber Music Amarillo's Fibonacci Space (3306 SW 6th Ave.)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p — Sugg. Donation: $15

RSVP online here, or call Jenny at 806-367-9088.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Nothing dampens winter doldrums like that first purple peeper pushing up through your still-chilly garden or yard. (Or maybe she's white or gold?)

Whatever petals she's pushing, the first crocus remains an annual celebration of the hope and promise of the lush Spring to come.   

Today's installment of Growing on the High Plains takes a long look at these punctual pals. With their knack for tackling the gale-force gusts and dry climate of our region, there's no denying the mighty crocus will ever emerge triumphant -- especially in the hearts of the winter weary.

HPPR's Living Room Concert Series presents The DustJackets - TWO SHOWS! (Garden City & St. Francis)

Shows @ 7p ~ Suggested donation: $15

---------------------------------------------

FIRST SHOW: Friday, April 14 @ HPPR Studios - Garden City, KS

RSVP HERE FOR GARDEN CITY!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

To our Crazy Beautiful fans in the HPPR area: 

 Due to restrictions on travel visas coming into the United States, Tommy & I regret that we are unable to travel to Amarillo, Texas for our 3/30 concert. It's truly beyond our control and we hope to reschedule for Fall. Please accept our apology for any inconvenience.    Peace, Tia

Mash them. Hash them. Slice, dice, or fry them. No matter how they're prepared, the potato remains one of the world's most popular side dishes. However, a little research will unearth quite a history.

On this week's edition of Growing on the High Plains, we'll dig up the dirt on this radical root vegetable -- from it's little-known origin story to it's controversial reception across the globe.

Whether whipped into wig dust, carved for a crime, or impaled for juvenile amusement, this shape-shifting spud has certainly seen a lot through its many eyes.

Who knew so many of the good people of Garden City would venture out on a Sunday night for a live jazz concert? 

HPPR would like to thank our honored guests, The Bob Bowman Trio from Kansas City, for their phenomenal concert on  March 6th. It was broadcast live on air from our Garden City studio in front of a live audience.  

This show was made possible by: Hicks Thomas LLC - A Texas energy and trial law firm.

You wouldn't think anyone's grandmother would take their grandchild into the woods to pluck a poisonous plant for a noonday snack.

However, today's edition of Growing on the High Plains takes me back to my childhood memories of foraging pokeweed, also known as pokeberry, inkberry, and Phytolacca americana.   

This potentially toxic foliage has applications ranging from succulent side dish to a berry-based dye to a handy home remedy.

 

We all have one: that list of  garden chores we scribbled down with good intentions.

It's that back-burner list that is far less pressing than the imminent "dig in the dirt" directives.

Though each year, some of those stagnant "to-do" items never seem to get "to-done." 

Today on Growing on the High Plains, I share my experiences with the daunting task of prioritizing what must be done and what can linger a little longer. 

Today's  installment of Growing on the High Plains  might feel a bit like an audio submission to the Antiques Roadshow, as I share with you the history of my prized collection of authentic McCoy pottery.

More than a century ago, Nelson McCoy  founded his famed stoneware company in Roseville, Ohio. The vessels were noted for their simple, utilitarian design, as well as their durable, high-quality construction. In fact, I can attest that these puppies are indeed resilient -- even in the face of a potential catastrophe.

Scroll down for some snapshots of my assembled assortment of antique McCoy planters. As you can see, they're almost as pretty as the plants they present.

Valentine's day is coming, and love is in the air. So today on Growing on the High Plains, I'll tell you about an enchanted, amorous bloom often referred to as "Love in a Mist." 

You know how that special someone makes you feel like you're walking on air? Likewise, these bright, ethereal blooms appear to levitate over a frothy, feathered bed of foliage.  But watch out! Like lovers, they'll grow thorny with time. Thankfully, like love, they're always worth the trouble.

To some people, a plant is a plant is a plant. But to the phytophilous (or plant-loving) High Plains gardener, identifying our native flora can often be as fun as tending their beds.

Today's installment of Growing on the High Plains compares two competing conventions.

First, we'll discuss the often-complex botanical naming system used to identify various species of plants. (Sometimes, it's all Latin to me.)

Next, I'll share a few of the delightful "common names" often used as shorthand when describing three of my favorite house plants.

“One of the best flatpickers anywhere.”

—The Huffington Post 

Beppe Gambetta - Live in Amarillo

Chalice Abbey ~ 2717 Stanley

Doors @ 7p  |  Show @ 7:30p

Sugg. donation: $15

***ALERT: This show is SOLD OUT. 

***To be put on the WAITING LIST,  call HPPR at 806.367.9088 with your NAME & PHONE #. ***

We've all seen them.

Those curious mirrored balls, perched among the pansies, gracing the gladiolas, and reflecting a fish-eye panorama of the garden in which it resides?

Well, these ocular orbs have a long history! On today's Growing on the High Plains, I'll round out your knowledge of these garden globes, including a personal story of how I acquired my own.  

You've probably seen these curious little creatures before—perhaps on the periphery at a plant shops, woven into an indoor "green wall," or possibly dangling from an overhead glass orb at a specialty gift boutique.

Quite alien in appearance, these tropical treasures are called tillandsias, but you might better know them as "air plants." 

Today's Growing on the High Plains continues our conversation about 2017 New Year's resolutions.

Last week, I discussed how "working the land" indeed encourages physical activity, which leads to overall fitness, flexibility, weight loss, and heart health -- all of which are excellent goals for the new year.

But that's not all! This week, I'll explain how the benefits of gardening also lead to a healthy mind. Lucky for us, making a commitment to getting our hands dirty  will help keep our memories cleanly intact. 

Pages