Morning Edition on HPPR

Weekdays from 5:00 to 9:00am CT; weekends from 7:00 to 9:00 am CT

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with Morning Edition from NPR and HPPR. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring you the day's news stories and interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite yo to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Special HPPR features:
- Oil and Gas Report: 5:19, 6:39, 7:20 am
- Weather:  5:20, 6:20, 6:49, 7:19, 8:20 am
- Looking Back (regional history): 5:49 am
- HPPR Events Calendar: 5:50, 7:50, 8:50 am
- Marketplace Report: 5:51, 6:51, 7:51, 8:51 am
- Writer's Almanac: 8:30 am
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Business
11:56 pm
Wed October 3, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 5:19 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business concerns another unlikely franchise, "Jersey Shore."

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: I love "Jersey Shore."

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: I love Guido.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "JERSEY SHORE")

PAUL DELVECCHIO: There's no way I'm going to Jersey without my hair jell.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Middle East
11:56 pm
Wed October 3, 2012

Turkey, Syria Exchange Fire For A 2nd Day

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 5:19 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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National Security
10:49 pm
Wed October 3, 2012

First Female Marines Take Combat Leadership Test

Female Marines unload their rifles after a patrol with Afghan soldiers in Helmand province in June. The Marine Corps leadership has started an experiment to determine whether female Marine lieutenants have what it takes to become infantry officers and lead on the battlefield.
Adek Berry AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 5:19 am

Women in the U.S. military have been flying warplanes for years, and recently began serving in artillery and tank units. But they're still barred from direct ground combat.

Now, for the first time in the course's 35-year history, the Marine Corps is putting the first women through its grueling Infantry Officer Course: 86 days crawling through obstacle courses, lugging heavy machine guns, navigating the woods at night.

Col. Todd Desgrosseilliers, the top trainer at Marine Base Quantico in Virginia, says there's a good reason the course is so tough that 1 in 5 Marines fail.

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Asia
10:47 pm
Wed October 3, 2012

Faltering Economy Threatens Pakistan's Stability

A demonstrator reacts after Pakistani policemen fire tear gas during a protest against power cuts in Karachi in June. Pakistan suffers from a massive energy crisis, one of several factors contributing to the country's severe economic troubles.
Rizwan Tabassum AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 5:19 am

If you want to gain a good insight into Pakistan's economic situation, just look at a few of the country's newspaper headlines on any given day. The language says it all: prices soar, stocks plunge, budget deficit swells, foreign investment evaporates — and the list goes on.

Now, analysts are increasingly worried that the faltering economy could join Pakistan's pervasive insurgency and repeated political upheavals as another serious threat to the country's stability.

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Monkey See
10:47 pm
Wed October 3, 2012

Recreating Indiana Jones' Boulder Run In D.C.'s 'Alley Of Doom'

Janet Whitley borrows a stranger's dog to run away from a 10-foot-high plastic boulder in Washington, D.C.'s "Alley of Doom."
Chris Suspect STRATA

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 5:19 am

At a back alley in Washington, D.C., an innocent bike rider came upon a Prius driving right at him head-on. The Prius, in turn, was being chased by a 10-foot boulder.

The bike rider had accidentally stumbled into "The Alley of Doom."

For one day, anyone who showed up to this alley in the U Street neighborhood of Washington, D.C., could take a free turn at playing Indiana Jones — donning a fedora and whip and fleeing from a gigantic, rolling boulder.

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Around the Nation
2:24 am
Wed October 3, 2012

High School's Dress Code Spoils Homecoming Dance

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 5:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Food
2:23 am
Wed October 3, 2012

Michelle Obama Wins Cookie Recipe Contest

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 5:14 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Michelle Obama can celebrate a win today, now that her white and dark chocolate-chip cookies beat out Ann Romney's M&M cookies in Family Circle Magazine's Presidential Bake-Off. During the 2008 election, Cindy McCain's oatmeal butterscotch cookies won. Michelle Obama may be savoring her victory all the more, since on this, the couple's 20th anniversary, she's had to trade date night for debate night. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Planet Money
1:14 am
Wed October 3, 2012

Why New York Is A Hub In The Global Trinket Trade

Lam Thuy Vo NPR

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 6:07 am

For more on the junk economy, see this slideshow.

There's a neighborhood in New York City that has always been a mystery to us. Smack dab in the middle of Manhattan, around 29th street, is the wholesale district. There you can find rows of narrow storefronts packed to the ceiling with trinkets. Racks and racks of fake gold chains. Acres of souvenir lighters and walls of belt buckles. Plastic, plastic, plastic toys.

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It's All Politics
1:13 am
Wed October 3, 2012

On Eve Of First Debate, NPR Poll Shows Romney Within Striking Distance

Early voting has begun in the battleground states of Ohio, Virginia and Iowa. Voting booths were set up for early voting Thursday at the Black Hawk County Courthouse in Waterloo, Iowa. Ahead of Wednesday's first presidential debate, an NPR poll finds President Obama with a 7-point lead nationally, but his GOP challenger, Mitt Romney, is within striking distance.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 8:38 am

The latest poll by NPR and its bipartisan polling team [pdf] shows President Obama with a 7-point lead among likely voters nationally and a nearly identical lead of 6 points in the dozen battleground states where both campaigns are spending most of their time and money.

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History
11:20 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Wikipedia Politicizes Landmark Historical Event

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 5:14 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

When President Obama and Mitt Romney debate tonight, many people will ask if their claims are true. Each one has already been asking that about the other side.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: They will try to distract you and sometimes - how do I put this nicely? They will just fib.

MITT ROMNEY: The president tends to - how shall I say it? - say things that aren't true.

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Business
11:20 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Homeowners Facing Foreclosure Get New Protections

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 5:14 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Business
11:20 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 5:14 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with good news for automakers.

U.S. auto sales last month were the best they've been in four and a half years. That's according to numbers compiled by the research firm Auto Data. Experts give credit the boost in sales to cheap financing for car loans and growing consumer confidence. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
11:20 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Early Voting Gets Underway In Ohio

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 5:14 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Early voting began in Ohio yesterday. More than a million people have signed up for mail-in ballots, and thousands more began voting in person. From member station WKSU, M.L. Schultze reports.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:37 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Medicare Dings Hospitals For Too Many Repeat Customers

Denver Health has a network of clinics to keep track of patients discharged from its hospital.
Denver Health

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 5:14 am

A paradox of American health care is that hospitals are sometimes rewarded for doing things badly.

Patients who are discharged, for example, shouldn't have to come right back because they got worse after getting home. But if they do come back, hospitals benefit because they can fill an empty bed and bill for more care.

The federal government says, in fact, that Medicare alone pays $17.4 billion a year for unnecessary return visits.

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All Tech Considered
10:35 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Calif. Greenlights Self-Driving Cars, But Legal Kinks Linger

California Gov. Jerry Brown (front left) rides in a driverless car to a bill signing at Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., on Sept. 25.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 12:56 pm

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James Bond At 50
10:34 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

The Sound Of James Bond: Vic Flick's Surf Guitar

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 8:36 am

The 007 theme is one of the most famous themes in movie history. The infamous guitar riff that gives the theme its secret agent feel was performed by Vic Flick, who spoke to Morning Edition about the day he played it, 50 years ago.

In 1962, Flick was a 25-year-old studio guitarist who was asked to help give the James Bond theme more of a punch. Composer Monty Norman, who wrote the theme, was scrambling to complete the score for the first Bond movie, Dr. No. He'd scratched out a rough draft of the theme, but Flick says it fell a little flat.

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The Salt
10:25 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

In Washington State, Picker Shortage Threatens Apple Boom

Amilia Magno, 23, of Pasco, Wash., carries a heavy load of buckeye gala apples in Broetje Orchards near Prescott, Wash.
Anna King Northwest News Network

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 12:57 pm

In western Michigan, there aren't enough apples to pick because bad weather decimated 85 to 90 percent of the crop. But Washington state has the opposite problem — there's an abundance of apples, but not enough pickers.

This should be the happiest, busiest time of year in Washington apple orchards. But now — just as the peak of apple harvest is coming on — Broetje Orchards manager Roger Bairstow is wincing.

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Sweetness And Light
5:03 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

The NFL's Lesson: There's No Replacing Good Refs

Referee Walt Anderson makes a call in the Chicago Bears game against the Dallas Cowboys Monday, ending the NFL's first full slate of games with its regular officials.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 5:14 am

So, we found out that the National Football League is too big to fail. But not so big that it couldn't make a complete fool of itself and show to the world that its owners are stingy, greedy nincompoops.

Not so big that it couldn't make its commissioner, Roger Goodell, stand out in front, looking lost and small, so that their erstwhile tough-guy commander suddenly became an errand boy, losing respect and dignity that will be hard to regain the next time he needs it.

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Law
8:08 am
Tue October 2, 2012

Judge Postpones Pennsylvania's Voter ID Law

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A judge in Pennsylvania has blocked a key part of that state's new voter ID law, a law that's caused controversy. Now, come Election Day, voters showing up at the polls can still be asked to show a government-issued photo ID, but they will not be prevented from voting if they don't have one. NPR's Pam Fessler has been covering the story and she joins us now. Good morning.

PAM FESSLER, BYLINE: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: So, remind us what this Pennsylvania law is - you know, why it's been making national news.

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Around the Nation
2:56 am
Tue October 2, 2012

'Fearless Felix' To Try To Break Sound Barrier

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 8:08 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with best wishes to Felix Baumgartner. He plans to ride a balloon to an altitude of 23 miles over New Mexico and then he will step out into the void. Fearless Felix will be wearing a pressurized suit like an astronaut and expects to break the sound barrier as he falls. He's being advised by a former NASA flight surgeon who lost his wife in a shuttle crash and who wants to improve astronauts' odds of surviving a future disaster. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
2:47 am
Tue October 2, 2012

Survey: Bald Man Are Perceived As Manlier

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 8:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Asia
1:44 am
Tue October 2, 2012

Okinawans Protest Deployment Of U.S. Osprey

An Osprey arrives at U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Futenma in Ginowan city on Japan's southern island of Okinawa on Monday. Six Ospreys were deployed in Okinawa, drawing sharp reactions from residents amid persistent concerns about the aircraft's safety.
JIJI Press AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 3:21 pm

A new deployment of U.S. military aircraft to Okinawa has sparked protests and reignited residents' long-simmering resentment of America's military presence there. Opponents say the vertical takeoff Osprey has a poor safety record and poses a danger to inhabitants of the densely populated Japanese island.

U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Futenma is surrounded by the city of Ginowan. At Futenma No. 2 Elementary School, 200 yards outside the base, the roar of rotor blades can be so deafening that classes can't be held without keeping heavily reinforced windows shut.

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Election 2012
12:24 am
Tue October 2, 2012

The Politics Of Election Polls

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 8:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

President Obama has held a lead over Mitt Romney in the polls for several weeks now, and that's prompted a conservative reaction. Some are charging that big media outlets are intentionally designing their polling to make it look like the president is getting the kind of voter surge he had in 2008. NPR's David Folkenflik has the story.

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NPR Story
12:24 am
Tue October 2, 2012

2013 Car Models

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 8:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

'Tis the season for new car buying. Fall is when automakers roll out their latest models - with new technologies and better fuel efficiency. And to talk about the latest trends, we reached Michelle Krebs in Detroit. She's a senior analyst at the auto information website Edmunds.com.

Good to have you back, Michelle.

MICHELLE KREBS: Glad to be back.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
12:24 am
Tue October 2, 2012

Retailers Paying More For Fraud-Related Costs

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 8:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And here in the U.S., for retailers, the cost they pay for consumer fraud is going up. Merchants who sell their products using mobile devices or sell internationally are seeing their costs climbing higher still - almost 40 over last year.

NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

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The Two-Way
10:36 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Brain-Damaged Man Wins New Trial In Two-Decades-Old Killing

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 8:08 am

Richard Lapointe confessed in 1989 that he stabbed, raped and killed his wife's 88-year-old grandmother two years earlier. But in the 23 years since, experts in criminal justice have come to better understand how sometimes people make false confessions — especially someone with brain damage, like Lapointe. On Monday, Connecticut's state Appellate Court ordered a new trial, saying prosecutors wrongly withheld potentially important evidence.

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It's All Politics
10:35 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

In North Carolina, Latino Voters Could Be Crucial To Winning The State

A sign directs voters to polls at a polling station on Nov. 4, 2008, in Shallotte, N.C.
Logan Mock-Bunting Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 8:24 am

In this year's presidential campaign, $11 million has been spent so far on ads targeting Hispanics, according to ad-tracking firm Kantar Media/CMAG.

That's eight times the amount spent four years ago on Spanish-language ads, and it's focused in just a handful of battleground states: Florida, Nevada, Colorado and, perhaps most surprisingly, North Carolina.

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It's All Politics
10:33 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Colorado's Undecided Voters Are A Hot Election Commodity

A rare thunderstorm produced hail, torrential rain and a double rainbow in downtown Fort Collins, Colo., last month.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 8:08 am

Throughout the series First and Main this election season, Morning Edition is traveling to contested counties in swing states to find out what is shaping voters' decisions.

The series started in Florida and the hotly contested county that includes Tampa, then continued to a county in Wisconsin that voted twice for George W. Bush and then swung to Barack Obama.

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Books
10:21 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Boozy Birth Of The American Mafia In Lehane's Latest

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 8:08 am

Here's how the new novel from crime writer Dennis Lehane begins: "Some years later, on a tugboat in the Gulf of Mexico, Joe Coughlin's feet were placed in a tub of cement."

Pretty hard to stop reading after an opening line like that — at least you'd think. "It was funny, a guy came up to me the other night, and he said, 'I really loved this book once it got going,' " Lehane tells NPR's Steve Inskeep. "I thought, 'Jesus Christ, read the first sentence! How much more "getting going" is it going to get?' "

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Movie Interviews
10:21 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Shaking, Stirring Up The James Bond Franchise

Siblings Barbara Broccoli and Michael G. Wilson have been working on James Bond films since the 1970s. They are the producers of the latest installment, Skyfall.
Stuart Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 8:08 am

This Friday marks 50 years since the release of the first James Bond film, Dr. No. Ian Fleming's Cold War-era MI6 agent has endured through 22 movies, evolving all the while to stay relevant to new audiences. The next installment is Skyfall, due out Nov. 9.

Barbara Broccoli and Michael Wilson are the franchise's current producers and children of the original producer, Albert "Cubby" Broccoli. NPR's David Greene spoke to them about the family business.

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