High Plains Public Radio

agriculture

Suchat Pederson / Suchat Pederson, The (Wilmington, Del.) News Journal

Since December, six major agriculture companies have agreed to merge, including Dow and Dupont. The agriculture industry has since come under criticism for the “tsunami” of huge corporate mergers.

High Plains Journal

Kansas farmers are looking to build a relationship with Cuba, reports The High-Plains/Midwest Ag Journal.

agweb.com

As the ag industry continues to consolidate into larger and larger corporations, reactions from farmers and farm-groups have been decidedly mixed.

Joe Amon / The Denver Post

The United States has unseated Germany to become the top producer of hops in the world—thanks in large part to the efforts of Colorado.

As The Denver Post reports, the U.S. has regained the title of world hop leader for the first time in decades. Over the last two years, Colorado has experienced an estimated 166 percent increase in total acres of hops planted. The acreage serves to support the state’s more than 300 craft breweries.

Rich / Creative Commons

A new study finds that, on average, Nebraska counties that receive a certain livestock-friendly designation gain more cattle farms and lose fewer hog farms than counties without it, reports The Sioux City Journal.

The designation is part of a program created by the Nebraska Legislature over ten years ago. Some rural counties are give0n the designation, and this often leads to more business.

WBAY

The total number of farms in the U.S. is decreasing. But the number of women-led farms has increased, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

As WBAY reports, the percentage of primary farm operators who are women has doubled in the past 20 years. The share of farms owned by women is up to 14 percent now, according to the last census by the USDA.

Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

In November Oklahoma voters will decide on State Question 777. Supporters are calling the ballot initiative a “right-to-farm” bill, but opponents prefer the term “right-to-harm.”

As StateImpact Oklahoma reports, right-to-farm is a divisive national issue that’s made its way to Oklahoma. The question has pitted pro-agriculture activists against environmentalists and animal-rights activists in a statewide battle for votes.

Charles Bertram / Lexington Herald-Leader

A program in Kentucky could be used as a template for how to improve rural health care costs nationwide, reports the Lexington Herald-Leader.

A new initiative by the University of Kentucky has found that offering employees a share in a local farm harvest could impact health care costs.

Helen H. Richardson / The Denver Post

At one time Colorado was one of the nation’s biggest apple producers, on par with Washington state. Colorado’s apple farmers even won gold medals at the World’s Fair in St. Louis, back in 1904.

Public Domain

A new report predicts that construction will be the fastest growing sector of Nebraska’s economy through 2018, says Net Nebraska. The study predicts that construction employment in Nebraska will reach a record level this year and continue to grow. The sector is expected to expand by almost 10 percent over 2007 levels. Much of the construction growth will be due to state tax dollars for roads projects.

Steve Sisney / The Oklahoman

There’s a debate raging in Oklahoma ag circles about something known simply as “Question 777,” reports NewsOK.com. State Question 777 is a constitutional amendment that would prevent Oklahoma lawmakers from regulating agriculture in many cases. Legislators would only be able to act if the Oklahoma had a “compelling state interest” to change the laws. Voters will go to the polls in November to decide this “right to farm” question.

Travis Morrisse / Hutchinson News

From Kansas Agland:

Kansas net farm income in 2015 hit a 30-year low, reaching a level not seen since the 1980s farm crisis.

Accrual net farm income across 1,159 Kansas Farm Management Association farms averaged $4,568, drastically down from a five-year average of $120,000.

USDA.gov

The US Department of Agriculture has launched a new fund that will invest millions in rural agriculture businesses, reports The Rural Blog. The Open Prairie Rural Opportunities Fund has the potential to pour as much as $100 million into rural food and agriculture. The fund also has high growth potential, the USDA said in a press release.

Calvin Mattheis / Hutchinson News

From Kansas Agland:

It is evident from the sweeping acres of sorghum, wheat and pastures of cattle, the irrigated circles that can be seen from the sky, and from the scenic overlook at Dodge City where thousands of cattle are fattening:

Kansas’ backbone is agriculture.

Rural Blog

Many High Plains residents are celebrating agriculture today. March 15 is National Ag Day, a holiday that falls right in the middle of National Ag Week, from March 13-19. This is the perfect chance to recognize the importance of local agricultural in your community, says The Rural Blog.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

From Harvest Public Media

The number of farms and ranches in the U.S. is on the decline and the farms that remain are getting bigger, according to new data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The U.S. has lost nearly 120,000 farms since 2008, and 18,000 last year alone, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The average farm size in the U.S. increased 5 percent over those 7 years, to an average size of 441 acres in 2015.

FHSU Gets More Than $700K Federal Grant for Ag Program

Feb 14, 2016
Fort Hays State University

HAYS – Fort Hay State University has been awarded a grant of more than $700,000 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to develop curricula focused on the use of small unmanned aerial systems in precision agriculture, the university announced in February.

The program, under development by FHSU, is expected to enhance and improve the technical and analytical skill sets of future farm managers, technicians and crop advisors. The grant is part of a $4 million award to Non-Land Grant Colleges and Universities, according to a press release.

Allison McCartney / Reveal

A new venture from PRX and the Center for Investigative Reporting called Reveal has been producing shows of great interest to High Plains farmers and ranchers. One recent episode, “The Salmonella Shuffle” shows how the U.S. government still allows companies to sell chicken that is infected with salmonella.

Mose Buchele

Texas’s state nut is looking to make a comeback. Pecans were all the rage in the 60s, but then the almond took over. Since then, the US almond crop has grown 33-fold. But now, StateImpact Texas reports that things are looking up for the Lone Star staple. The USDA has allowed the pecan industry to start something called a “federal marketing order.” This will allow pecan producers to pool their money and market their product.

David Morris / Creative Commons

The Center for Rural Affairs has long heard complaints from small- and mid-sized farms that the federal crop insurance program unfairly benefits large corporate farms and causes land values to rise. So the Center decided to investigate. Their research determined that subsidized crop insurance indeed has an impact on land values.

Kansas Biologist Takes Issue with Textbook Ag Science

Nov 11, 2015
Professor John Richard Schrock

For decades Americans have been asking whether it’s better for the earth if humans are herbivores, carnivores or somewhere on the omnivore spectrum? Some textbooks purport to have the answers, claiming to show in graphs and clear language that “herbivore” is by far the best route for humans and the planet. The textbooks insist that any land used for crops will increase the world’s food supply. But biologist John Richard Schrock disagrees, reports Kansas Public Radio.

Colorado State University Photography

From Harvest Public Media:

Close to 60,000 jobs are set to open up in agriculture, food and natural resource sectors each year for the next five years, according to a report from Purdue University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Jacob Byk / Kansas Agland

From Kansas Agland:

The importance of farming and ranching to the state’s economy touches all Kansans – and, according to the latest Kansas Department of Agriculture figures – the world.

In its latest figures, the department states that agriculture’s annual output was about $62 billion in 2012 – the most recent figures available – accounting for 43 percent of the state’s total economy.

Andy Marso / Kansas Health Institute

From the Kansas Health Institute:

Bill would give Department of Agriculture oversight of ‘noxious weed’ designation.

The rows of grapevines at Somerset Ridge Vineyard and Winery near Paola are withering, with dying leaves and shriveling fruit.

But that’s expected this time of year.

Sandra J. Milburn / Hutchinson News

Jamie and Tim Kaminkow of Moundridge, Kansas, have found a novel way to make their farm meaningful to the larger population this fall, reports The Washington Times. After planting 8,000 pumpkins this summer, the Kaminkows have invited children from nearby cities to their farm to learn about agriculture.

Jacob Byk / Hutchinson News

From Kansas Agland:

McPHERSON - Autumn arrives in Kansas this week, but for Monte Dossett, the annual fall harvest has been commencing for a few weeks.

Study: Crop Diversity Has Declined in US

Sep 24, 2015
US Census of Agriculture

A new study indicates that the diversity of crops grown by American farmers since 1978 has declined, reports The Rural Blog. The study was performed at the county level. It discovered that the lowest crop diversity was found in the upper Midwest states. States in the West and South fared better.

Areas with high crop diversity tend to be more resistant to disease, pest, and crop failure. But there is room for swift positive change. Unlike natural ecosystems, croplands are replanted yearly. Thus, they can recover from stagnation more quickly.

Monsanto Hopes to Purchase Pesticide Behemoth

Aug 5, 2015
Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

A possible deal was announced this week that could have a lasting impact on American farmers, reports Harvest Public Media. The monolithic agricultural company Monsanto has proposed a deal to purchase the world’s largest pesticide company, Syngenta. Monsanto has said that it aims to find new ways to combine chemicals and biotech crops. In an effort to expand, the company has been recently been buying up a lot of tech companies.

Rain muddies farm plans

May 22, 2015

More rain and less warmth than normal is both a blessing and challenge to farmers. About 60 percent of corn is in the ground in the Texas Panhandle. Jourdan Bell is a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Agronomist. He says he’s concerned about fungal disease. Some seed put in the ground hasn’t germinated, and in saturated conditions you can see degradation and possible infection. Bell also says if the corn’s not planted by early May, there can be some pretty hefty yield degradation. That’s led to farmers considering planting grain sorghum. The moisture’s has a mixed impact on wheat. Bell says there’s been a lot of hail damage and very heavy disease pressure, but he thinks farmers will see a considerable boost in yields.

Calvin Mattheis / The Hutchinson News

Kansas farmers are getting ready to bring in the wheat harvest, they are again being targeted to help make up Topeka’s budget woes reports Amy Bickel for Kansas Agland.

There’s a proposed $3 excise tax on all land- agricultural, residential, and commercial.  The bill is proposed by Sen Jeff Melcher- R-Leawood.

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