animal welfare

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Amarillo and the surrounding areas continue to be overrun with large numbers of feral cats and stray dogs. In fact, the ratio of humans to animals in Amarillo is larger than in bigger cities like Austin and Waco.

But now, as The Amarillo Globe-News reports, the Amarillo Humane Society has a plan to do something about the problem, and it could mean big changes in the way the local Humane Society operates.

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Last week, Kansas took in a few dozen Texans who were fleeing Hurricane Harvey.

But, as The Wichita Eagle reports, these refugees were of the four-legged variety. In the wake of the devastating storm, three vans filled with bedraggled dogs and cats left Houston, heading for the Sunflower State.

The animals had been housed in Texas shelters. When the hurricane hit, they were basically left homeless. Some had been in the shelters since April.

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Amarillo’s animal welfare office may soon change the period they’ll hold stray animals from three days to two days, reports the Amarillo Globe-News.

The new ordinance would mean that more animals may be euthanized. That’s because rescuers would have one less day to claim stray animals before they’re put down.

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This Saturday, High Plains animal lovers will have an opportunity to celebrate some of the most majestic creatures on earth.

As The Amarillo Globe-News reports, Saturday is World Lion Day, and the Amarillo Zoo will be showing off its beautiful pride of lions.

The zoo will host a variety of special activities, along with crafts for kids and education exhibits. The lion party takes place from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.

Ullstein Bild / Chron.com

Spring is approaching, and that means dangerous High Plains animals will be out on the prowl. The Houston Chronicle has published a helpful guide to know what to do in case of trouble.

If you encounter a wild boar, remain calm and move away slowly. If the boar attacks, climb at least six feet off the ground. If you can’t climb, try to stay on your feet.

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One of the world’s most famous wolf packs may be gone thanks to years of excessive hunting, reports The Guardian.

Alaska’s wolves were celebrated in novels by Jack London, and the East Fork pack has been studied for longer than any other collection of wolves on earth.

KFDA

On this summer holiday, it’s important to remember Americans of a furrier ilk. Every Independence Day animals are at risk of injury, notes KFDA.

Pets can become spooked by fireworks and run away, or be injured by the explosives themselves. Christy Fischer, Assistant Director of Amarillo Animal Management & Welfare, says the Fourth of July is the busiest day for most any shelter across the country.

Here are some steps you can take to protect your animals this holiday:

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Colorado officials are resisting a new wolf policy, reports ABC News. The federal government is expanding plans to restore endangered Mexican gray wolves to the Southwest. The attempt to import the predators has now spread to Colorado. About 110 Mexican gray wolves already roam portions of Arizona and New Mexico.

Texas Panhandle Has Shortage of Large Animal Vets

Dec 19, 2015
Lubbock Avalanche-Journal

The recent announcement of a proposed Texas Tech veterinary school in the Texas Panhandle has split interested parties into two camps. But there’s one thing they can all agree on: The area could use more veterinarians who specialize in large animals. West Texas clearly has a need for more vets for feed animals. But economics have make it difficult to attract large animal veterinarians to rural communities, reports Amarillo.com.

Jim Urquhart / Reuters

Yellowstone National Park has caused controversy with its annual slaughter of some of the bison roaming the park. But now, reports The Guardian, Yellowstone is looking to relocate the animals rather than cull them. The original plan was that the park would deliver bison to Native American tribes for slaughter. The annual cull helps reduce the risk of bison passing brucellosis on to Montana’s cattle.

A Tour of a Meatpacking Facility with Temple Grandin

Oct 23, 2015
Rosalie Winard / The Economist

Much has changed in the American meatpacking industry since the publication of Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle 109 years ago. The Economist recently joined animal-welfare and autism-awareness advocate Temple Grandin for a tour of a Colorado meat-processing facility. The Fort Morgan facility is a massive operation; the plant employs 2,100 people and slaughters 4,600 cows every day.

In Austin, a New Type of Pet Business

Sep 30, 2015
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A new pet service opened in Austin this month, reports Texas Standard, but this is no ordinary kennel or groomer. The new business is the Pet Loss Center of Austin.

After Idaho Ruling, More Ag Gag Challenges to Come

Sep 23, 2015
Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

From Harvest Public Media:

After a federal judge struck down an Idaho law that made it illegal to take undercover video on farms and ranches, animal rights groups say they are primed to challenge similar so-called “ag gag” laws across the country.

University of Denver

Civil rights for animals may be the next frontier in the struggle for rights, reports Colorado Public Radio. Justin Marceau is the University of Denver’s first full-time animal professor, and he has been working hard to fight the so-called “Ag-Gag” law in Idaho, which makes filming inside of farms and slaughterhouses illegal. The litigation supposedly targets “extremists” and “agriterrorists.” But Marceau argues that the law would, in fact, prevent whistleblowers from exposing abuses in farms and slaughterhouses. 

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A federal district court has upheld a California law requiring eggs sold in the state to come from hens housed in more spacious cages.

Attorneys general of six states – Missouri, Nebraska, Iowa, Kentucky, Oklahoma and Alabama – sued to challenge the constitutionality of a California law requiring that all eggs sold in California be raised under standards laid out for California egg producers in a 2008 state ballot measure.

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An independent journalist says he’s found a way around the so-called “ag-gag” laws – flying drones over large livestock operations to document animal welfare problems and pollution.

Will Potter, a Washington D.C.-based environmental blogger, raised $75,000 on Kickstarter to buy drones and other equipment to do investigative work tracking animal abuse and pollution problems on large livestock operations.