Black History Month

Roland Godefroy

Told by her daughter, vocalist Lisa Simone Kelly, Feeling Good: The Nina Simone Story is a touching, intimate look at life, work and genius of jazz composer, pianist,  vocalist and civil rights activist Nina Simone.

The story of Black radio in Philadelphia is actually the story of Black music, of civil rights and progress in the African-American community, and of how the radio medium has changed in the last century.

Today, a lot of people don't know what the term "Black radio" means. But starting in the 1950s, Black radio used to be one of the most important institutions in the Black community, not only in Philadelphia, but in cities across the U.S.

World Economic Forum

Mandela: An Audio History is the award-winning radio series documenting the struggle against apartheid through intimate first-person accounts of Nelson Mandela himself, as well as those who fought with him, and against him.

Amarillo Globe-News

Marvell Ervin White is remembered in Amarillo as a community organizer and community activist.

Among her most notable accomplishments include organizing for a community center in Amarillo's North Heights district. White was honored as co-founder of the Amarillo United Citizens Forum, which saw the Cultural Center built in the early 1990's.

The Wichita Eagle

Contrary to the impression you might get from some of the old Hollywood Westerns you may have seen, cowboys of the Old West were not all white men.

Amarillo Globe-News

One year after Amarillo was first settled in 1887, Jerry Calloway moved to Amarillo.

Recognized as Amarillo's first black resident, Jerry Calloway moved to the city with a white family from Georgia, living as a domestic in the home of his employer J.C. Calloway.

amarillo.com

Matthew “Bones” Hooks was a trailblazer in Amarillo.  The son of slaves, Hooks is best known as a cowboy, an Amarillo civic leader, and the first black person to serve on a Potter County grand jury according to a recent article in the Amarillo Globe-News.

Hooks was also a leader in the religious community and a businessman, living in Mobeetie and Clarendon.  He worked to establish the North Heights subdivision in Amarillo.  Bones Hooks Park at North Hughes and Northwest 20th Avenue in Amarillo was named after him.