High Plains Public Radio

catfishing

Blue catfish season kicks off

Nov 26, 2016
Luke clayton

With this most recent cold front, the trophy blue catfish season begins. Shad will be moving to deeper, warmer water and those jumbo size blues will be in hot pursuit. 

In today's show, Luke talks about catching catfish with Guide David Hanson on Lake Tawakoni, the Catfish Capital of Texas and shares details of some exciting deer hunts he enjoyed close to home.

Luke Clayton

Jump in the truck with me and let’s head down to Lake Tawakoni, located about an hour east of Dallas. Tawakoni is a great fishing lake for many species but especially blue and channel catfish. We’ll join veteran catfish guide David Hanson (903-268-7391) and enjoy some fast paced catching in the shade of the brand new Two Mile Bridge. David is baiting the area with soured grain and cattle cubes and catching regular limits of good eating channel catfish in the 1.5 to 3 pound range.

Luke Clayton

Join me this week and let's discuss catching and eating an often overlooked species of catfish, the bullhead.

There are three species of bullheads, the black, brown and yellow/, black being the most prevalent.

Luke Clayton

Luke discusses fishing reports this week and how best to "glean" reliable fishing information that will help you catch fish on your next outing. Luke also shares a bit of humor concerning a fishing trip earlier this week when he thought he "had em' figured out!"

Luke Clayton

The natural world is governed by cycles that repeat themselves in a pretty predictable pattern! We have learned much about the cycles or “patterns” of fish and wildlife. We know when to expect the whitetail rut or the crappie to move shallow. We fishermen have also learned when the time is right for catching trophy-size blue catfish or smaller fish better suited for the frying pan.

Luke Clayton

In today's era of political correctness, which definitely spills over into the outdoor press, we seldom read about going fishing when the primary goal is to catch fish to eat. It’s all about catch and release.

I’m a firm believer in releasing all the big fish of any species I’m targeting, even when out on a quest for fillets for a big fish fry. To me, a big fish fry is a tradition that is the ultimate end to a great fishing trip. 

A blue catfish weighing much over fifteen pounds is definitely not nearly as tasty as those smaller.

Luke Clayton

 Well, hello folks.  Boy, I tell you what, my work is so hard.  I have to spend time outdoors with friendly people, who've come to be my friends.  To top it off, they want to share what they've learned!  One of those is fishing guide, Seth Vanover.  This guy knows how to catch fish, and today, he's reminding me of what it takes to bring in the big ones.  The tips he gives can be applied anywhere to help you catch those summer cats.

Luke Clayton

Join Luke this week while he visits with Seth Vanover about the impact the fresh water from all the rain is having on catfishing.

Luke Clayton

Lake Fork guide Seth Vanover eased his comfortable guide boat up to a stick up in the back of a cove and secured the craft with a looped bow rope. The area had been deluged with a heavy rain the night before and the lake was on a welcome rise. We were fishing during the calm between two spring thunderstorms. The rising water had undulated shoreline grass introducing worms, crawfish and all sorts of insects into the food chain. This was classis text book spring time catfish waters if ever I’d seen them!

Winter Catfishin

Feb 13, 2015
Luke Clayton

The dead of winter is prime time for catching giant blue catfish. The listening area of High Plains Public Radio encompasses some of the very best catfishing waters in the country. In today's show, Luke highlights some of his favorite catfish waters and discusses a big catfish tournament down in Texas that is scheduled later this month, details at kingkatusa.com.   

Luke Clayton

Howdy Folks!

If you will take a few minutes and listen, Jason Barber will tell you the secrets of catching catfish and wipers now that spring has arrived and the water temperatures are warming up.  The warmer temperatures also mean the shad are spawning, and that's key for a successful day!