Family Recipes

Melany Wilks / Colby, KS

Hi, Radio Readers – I’m Melany Wilks talking to you from my home in Colby, KS.

Today, I am bringing you some thoughts that I had as I read Five Quarters of the Orange, by Joanne Harris.  Our subject discussion is on food and story this quarter.  As I read the book so many stories came into my mind.

Joanne Harris the author places the Francoise Simon in a small town, Les Laveuses. Mirabelle Dartigen shares how her mother wrote all her best recipes down in a book and handed them down to her daughter. In the midst of the recipes were snatches of history of life, especially during WWII.  It reminded me how my mother always wrote in the recipe books she used. She’d write down when it was first used it and what the occasion was.  Then she would write down how she changed the recipe to make it better or easier. 

Radio Readers BookByte: A Gustatory Home

Sep 15, 2017
Tom Averill

I’m Tom Averill, author of the culinary novel Secrets of the Tsil Café, and a “foodie” in my kitchen and in my library.

When I was writing my book, I became aware of how important food is to our identities as people, and how food memories shape us.  Cookbook writer Molly Katzen first learned the power of food at her childhood dinner table.  Her father had served in World War II, and while he was overseas, his mother died.  His favorite of all her dishes was tzimmes, a casserole dish of potatoes and onion and carrots often served at Rosh Hashanah.  Each year, Molly’s mother tried to replicate her mother-in-law’s recipe, and each year she failed—until the time her father tasted the tzimmes and broke down sobbing; his mother had come back to life in that dish.  Molly was 10 years old.  Perhaps all of us miss a person, along with the dish that person traditionally brought to the holiday meal.

Radio Readers BookByte: City Cafe Special

Aug 11, 2017
Valerie Brown-Kuchera / Quinter, KS

Welcome to Food Friday, when our Radio Reader Book Club members share recipes, memories, and mouthwatering tidbits.  This is Valerie Brown-Kuchera, from Quinter, Kansas.  My mom, Eleanor Augustine, is a potato salad evangelist with, as far as I know, a 100% conversion rate.  Her latest convert is my husband, who insisted he hated potato salad, but now heaps his plate full at our family picnics. 

Library of Congress

The Great Plains is its own eco-niche with distinctive plants, mammals, birds, weather, and history that constantly evolve. Its human population is as dynamic as these other unique factors. Those of us whose families have lived here for generations understand the world Willa Cather describes in My Antonia. Our families lived her stories. When we read them, we wonder how we got where we are today.