feral hogs

Luke Clayton

 Howdy Folks!

I'm finishing up a book on wild hog hunting and processing, and my research has led to a surprising discovery.  

Trappers can sell the pigs to processors.  the processing plants have a USDA Inspector on the premises.  

Each hog being shipped to Europe is tested for trichinosis, a parasite sometimes prevalent in hogs, and very widespread in bear.  I thought all hogs, both domestic and feral were carriers of trichinosis.  That's not so.  I learned in thousands of pounds of meat, not one has tested positive for this disease.

Luke Clayton

I like to keep our weekly visits lighthearted and hopefully share a bit of information and knowledge I’ve gleaned from kicking around in the outdoors the past half century. But occasionally I feel the need to “vent” a bit about outdoor related topics. What are your feelings about “hunting” wild hogs from helicopters? Let’s look at the many facets of this often controversial subject.

Luke Clayton

Curing and smoking ham at home is very easy. Pictured here are the hams from a 50 pound porker I took on a recent hunt. You can do this yourself!

Here how:

Order a packet of maple sugar cure from Frisco Spices www.friscospices.com. You will actually receive two packages of cure which is plenty for even a couple of ten pound hams. 

Mix a packet of cure with two quarts of water to create the brine. Place hams into the brine and place in refrigerator.

kansasagnetwork.com

Feral hogs are expanding their range, and now reside in more than 40 states.  They cause about $1.5 billion in damage every year reports Kansas Agland.

Charlie Lee is a wildlife management for Kansas State University Research and Extension.  He says the pigs damage crops, can kill young livestock and wildlife, destroy property, damage plant communities, and can carry diseases that threaten livestock.

That’s why the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, or APHIS, wants to reduce feral hog damage on a national level.

thewildbeat.com

This week, Luke discusses some of his views on hunting on HIGH PLAINS OUTDOORS. It's important for hunters to show respect for the animals and birds that they hunt. Granted, wild hogs are a problem for many in the south and southeast but swine, for many decades have been a staple food source. Even though wild hogs present problems to landowners, they are still animals and, as wild hogs, game animals. They should be treated with respect by hunters.

Luke Clayton

In this week's High Plains Outdoors, I'm wondering, "What game animal do you consider the most challenging to hunt?"  I hunt everything from elk and bear up in the mountain states to deer and birds. I consider a wise older wild sow the most adept at avoiding humans, thanks mostly to the refined sense of smell. I've been watching this one wild sow for the past 4 months on trail cameras and occasionally see her in the woods. One of the fat pigs is my target.

In my opinion, there is no finer eating game animal than a fat wild hog weighing between 20 and 50 pounds.

Luke Clayton

Howdy folks!  You have got to listen to this week's show!  I'm talking with big bore air rifle designer and builder Terry Tate.  We had quite an adventure hog hunting, and I got my first big game with an air rifle. 

latimes.com

Howdy Folks!

If you have some extra time this holiday season, I have a great outdoor idea.  Head on down to Texas, and go hog hunting.  It's economical; most hunts are around $150 per day and that includes lodging.

The internet is a great place to arrange your trip.  I do have a friend, Mark Ballette, at East Texas Exotics, and he'd be glad to help you out.

Until next time, enjoy the great outdoors!

Luke Clayton

“These bottoms remind me of south Louisiana. I thought everything was bone dry down here in Texas,” says Jake Hebert, pronounced "A-Bear,"  as my friend Larry Large and I drove them into the area we hunt hogs. Jake’s girlfriend Courtney Dugas, also a 110 Carat Cajun, agreed.

Necessity is the mother of invention, and that is certainly true for Don Gresham.  He had a problem with feral hogs tearing up his ranch, and decided to try a new approach to catching them.  He began using a portable pen, a feed broadcaster, and a wildlife camera.  He and his son discovered that even with evidence of a previous night's hunt, the animals still came into the pen.  They thought they could be onto something that would help other ranchers dealing with the same pest, and started to market it.  A buddy of Don's developed an ap for smart phones to monitor the trap from any location, and Goin Fencin was born. 

Menace to Meal

May 23, 2013
Goin Fencing

Don Gresham has discovered a way to turn negatives into positives when it comes to dealing with feral hogs.  Gresham is the owner of, "Goin Fencing," a portable trap for catching feral hogs.  Don was motivated by the destruction caused by these animals to invent a method for their capture.  Don combined the technology of smart phones with a circular trap to catch and contain the pigs.