Luke Clayton

My wife and I are making the annual trek to Galveston Bay for some fishing.  This year it's about red fish and trout.  I'm going out with Captain Mark Gonzales, he's with Captain Mike's Galveston Fishing Guides.

I'm sending you this audio postcard for a little taste of the great time I'm having, although I'm telling you, it's not as good as the red fish with lemon and butter I'm grilling for supper tonight.

Stay tuned.  Next week I'll have another adventure!

Luke Clayton

Howdy, Folks!

Here's my view this morning.  As I sit here, waiting for the feeder to bring the fish to this corner of my pond, my thoughts are running to how I got to this place in my life.  Why is my life about the outdoors?  The answer came to me relaxing on this dock.  Being outdoors gives me space to think.  There's a tranquility I can't find anywhere else.  Take a listen, you'll hear the crickets, the birds, the peacefulness of it all.  I'm encouraging you to spend a little time in the stillness of the country, away from people, traffic, and noise before summer's over.  You might discover something about yourself you never took time to find.

Until next time, enjoy the great outdoors.

Phil Zimmerman

In last week’s column we visited about my recent five-day fishing trip with Cree River Lodge to the remote waters of northern Saskatchewan. This week, I’d like to recreate a typical day up there, if there is such a thing as “typical” in the most awesome part of the world.

North to Canada!

Jul 3, 2015
Luke Clayton

 My longing to spend time in what I call the “North Country” began when I was a youngster reading accounts of hunting and fishing trips in Canada. This past week, thanks to the organizational skills of my friends Canadian outdoors writer Brad Fenson, Pat Babcock, owner of Cree River Lodge and the Saskatchewan Department of Tourism, my lifelong dream came to be. The fishing and scenery in this wild country was everything I had hoped it to be and… more!

Pond Boss

Just a matter of a few short months ago, many farm ponds and private fishing lakes were almost void of water, thanks to several years of sparse rainfall. I live a short distance from some old gravel pits that a few friends and I lease for fishing. I remember five or six years ago, I could launch a my 14-foot aluminum boat and use an electric trolling motor to push me to the very back of the farthest pond, a distance of at least a quarter mile. The fishing lease consists of several deeper pits that, during periods of normal rainfall, are connected by strips of shallow water.

The spread of Zebra mussels in Texas lakes has caused for new regulations that all fishermen/boaters should be aware of. Beginning July 1, boaters must drain all water from their boat and on-board receptacles before leaving or approaching  a body of fresh water anywhere in Texas.

Luke Clayton

Howdy Folks!

If you will take a few minutes and listen, Jason Barber will tell you the secrets of catching catfish and wipers now that spring has arrived and the water temperatures are warming up.  The warmer temperatures also mean the shad are spawning, and that's key for a successful day!

Folks, to this point, I’ve taught Cindee about bait, how to rig her pole, and where to look for catfish.  Today, I’m going to give her a tip that is a sure fire way to catch those cats.  

Howdy Folks.  This week I'm still trying to make Cindee into a fisherman- to be more specific- a catfisher. 

Last week we talked about how cats like deeper water this time of year- 22-24 foot deep.  If you can find shade over a ledge or cavity, or a creek feeding into the lake, you have a good chance to find catfish.

  Folks, today I called Cindee to give her an answer to the question, "What am I going to fish for on a hot, summer day?"  The answer is... catfish, and today I'm going to tell you where you can find them.

Catfish are just like us.  They like a cool place with plenty of oxygen.  This time of year, the spawn is over, and oxygen seems to be plentiful in about 22-24 foot of water.  So, you're going to have to fish a little deeper than you've been earlier in the season.

Lake Fork guide Seth Vanover buried his face in his side imaging sonar and instructed Billy Kilpatrick, Phil Zimmerman and myself to study the image.