Food and Drink

Wikimedia Commons

The State Fair of Texas gets underway next week in Dallas, and every year the list of edible oddities seems to get stranger.

And that’s no mean feat, as it will be hard to top last year’s deep-fried Doritos bacon mozzarella cheese stick.

Radio Readers BookByte: City Cafe Special

Aug 11, 2017
Valerie Brown-Kuchera / Quinter, KS

Welcome to Food Friday, when our Radio Reader Book Club members share recipes, memories, and mouthwatering tidbits.  This is Valerie Brown-Kuchera, from Quinter, Kansas.  My mom, Eleanor Augustine, is a potato salad evangelist with, as far as I know, a 100% conversion rate.  Her latest convert is my husband, who insisted he hated potato salad, but now heaps his plate full at our family picnics. 

Kelly Caminero / Daily Beast

Early last month, a Donald Trump surrogate threatened that if the New York billionaire wasn’t elected, the U.S. would have “taco trucks [on] every corner.” This prompted many Texans to say, “Sounds good to me!”

The Wichita Eagle

Tthere’s a new type of animal being raised on the Kansas plains, and it’s a bit smaller than cattle or even chickens. You might actually say it’s shrimpier. After the death of his father in 2012, Kansas farmer Bob Daniels decided it was time for a career change, reports Kansas.com. So, as any sensible agriculturist would do, he decided to start a shrimp farm. If all goes according to plan, the Sunflower Shrimp farm just south of Oxford could be open for business as soon as July.

Katharine Du / NPR

NPR.org recently took a look at the connection between genius and food. And they discovered that some of history’s greatest minds had some very peculiar dining habits. The French writer Honore de Balzac, for example, drank 50 cups of espresso a day. He died at age 51 . . . of caffeine poisoning. The Greek mathematician Pythagoras hated beans so much that he forbade his followers from even touching them.

Katharine Du / NPR

Getting too little sleep has long been associated with overeating and increased body weight. But Prairie Public News recently asked why. The answer appears to be that skimping on sleep can disrupt our circadian rhythms. Hormones associated with hunger and being satisfied are also affected.

Patrick Sison / AP photo

Saving your child from peanut allergies could actually be really simple, reports Quartz.com. The prevalence of the potentially life-threatening allergy  has risen more than 300% in the US since 1997. But last year, a team of British researchers struck on a promising method.

Alan Greenblatt / NPR

It’s Lent, and that means Catholics are looking for alternatives to their beloved beef. Sometimes, that can lead to interesting choices. Many Catholics abstain from eating meat on Fridays in observance of the season of penance between Ash Wednesday and Easter, notes SDPB radio. But the church has made sometime interesting exceptions at times, in some places.

Teen Drunk Driving Numbers Falling

Dec 22, 2015
Colorado Public Radio

Colorado Public Radio gave us a bit of good news this week. Decades of public service announcements and school documentaries about drunk driving appear to be working. There are far fewer young people drinking and driving than there were a decade ago. 2002, there has been almost a 40 percent drop in the number of young adults of legal drinking age who drive under the influence of alcohol. The drop was even more dramatic among teenagers.

Consumers are eating this stuff up.

Apr 19, 2015
File Photo / AP

In 2002 the U.S. government began certifying organic products, since then it has turned into an almost $40 Billion dollar a year industry.

Consumers are eating this stuff up, sales of organic goods has leapt 11% since last year and the number of organic producers in the U.S. has grown by 250% since 2002.

The industry estimates that organics now make up almost 5% of total food sales in the United States.” According to Kansas AgLand reporter Mary Clare Jalonick.