fossils

Xing Lida / Wikimedia Commons

You may know your state flower, but do you know your state fossil? According to The Atlantic, since the 1960s, most US states have elected their own official fossils. Often, the choice comes down to a dinosaur that was discovered in the region. For example, Colorado has claimed the Stegosaurus, since the plate-backed dinosaur was first found there.

U.S. Forest Service

Researchers in Colorado have unearthed an extremely rare fossil, reports weather.com. In fact, the fish fossil is one of only three in the world. Paleontologist Bruce Schumacher discovered the complete skull of the fish during a geological survey at the Comanche National Grassland in southeastern Colorado.

Bettman / Corbis

Dinosaurs have become an everyday part of the American imagination. From Jurassic World to The Good Dinosaur, we encounter these ancient behemoths perhaps more than we even realize. But how did this obsession come about? It happened largely thanks to the efforts of one man: Barnum Brown. Brown was born in frontier Kansas in 1873. Named after the great showman P.T. Barnum, Brown would grow up to become a master promoter in his own right.

salina.com

The High Plains has its very own Indiana Jones, and he’s alive and well, reports Salina.com. Bob Levin, a resident of Smith Center, Kansas, is an amateur paleontologist. He’s spent a lifetime hunting fossils. Over the years, he’s amassed a collection of 6,000 artifacts.

RedOrbit.com

When you think of dinosaurs you probably don’t think of the jitterbug. But a new study claims that the ancient creatures were, in fact, known to cut a rug. According to redorbit.com, dinosaurs danced to impress potential mates and as a way of scaring off enemies.

fivethirtyeight.com / American Museum of Natural History, Ken Carpenter

The Museum of Natural History in New York revealed its latest exhibit this month, reports fivethirtyeight.com. The exhibit features the gargantuan skeleton of a plant-eating sauropod. Many paleontologists think this is the largest dinosaur ever discovered. The dinosaur doesn’t even have a proper scientific name yet. It’s being called Titanosaur in the meantime. The skeleton is 122 feet long and 19 feet high, so big that its head pokes out into the museum’s elevator bay.

Bettman / Corbis

Dinosaurs have become an everyday part of the American imagination. From Jurassic World to The Good Dinosaur, we encounter these ancient behemoths perhaps more than we even realize. But how did this obsession come about? It happened largely thanks to the efforts of one man: Barnum Brown. Brown was born in frontier Kansas in 1873. Named after the great showman P.T. Barnum, Brown would grow up to become a master promoter in his own right.

Matthew Staver / New York Times

The New York Times reported this week on a hidden treasure in southeast Colorado—what the Times called “a dinosaur lover’s dream.” Picketwire Canyon is located on the Comanche National Grassland south of La Junta.

exploya.com / Creative Commons

Million years ago Western Kansas was covered by a great inland sea. The sea left chalk behind, creating the great formations known as Monument Rocks, now a national park in Gove County. It also left vertebrate fossils, like sharks and fish. This huge inland sea had a powerful effect on the land to the west—and the dinosaurs living there. Member station KPR says the best place to see the chalk left over from this sea is at Monument Rocks, or at Castle Rock in eastern Gove County.

Western Kansas Fossil Hunters to Appear on NOVA

Nov 11, 2015
Gwynn Williams

Chuck Bonner and Barbara Shelton have been collecting fossils in Western Kansas for years. They run a small gallery in a tiny limestone church 18 miles north of Scott City on US 83. But the number of people who have a chance to see their collection is about to grow—by about 52 million people.

First Carnivore Dinosaur Tooth Found at Black Mesa

Jul 15, 2013
byways.org

Black Mesa is the highest point in Oklahoma.  Its name comes from a layer of black volcanic rock that coated the mesa 10 million years ago.  Located in the northwest corner of the panhandle, it's where The University Herald says Dr. Mark Micozzi found a tooth from the largest land-dwelling carnivores- theropods.