governor

The four teenagers running to be the next governor of Kansas were tested Thursday at a forum organized by their peers at Lawrence Free State High School.

The list of Republican candidates running to become the next governor of Kansas continues to grow. Wichita businessman and former state Rep. Mark Hutton launched his campaign on Monday in Wichita.

The parade of candidates seeking the Kansas governor’s office continues to grow with the addition of Mark Hutton, a Republican former House member.

Hutton founded a construction company based in Wichita that he ran for years before moving into politics.

Another state lawmaker is joining the race for the 2nd District congressional seat in eastern Kansas.

Kansas Democratic House Leader Jim Ward is finally jumping into the race for governor.

Teenaged Gubernatorial Candidate Appears On Kimmel

Aug 14, 2017
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16-year-old Jack Bergeson may already have a leg-up in the Kansas gubernatorial race.

As The Topeka Capital-Journal reports, the Wichita high school student appeared on “Jimmy Kimmel Live” from his bedroom via video on Wednesday night, explaining his reason for running – that he is hoping to engage younger voters, even though he himself, cannot vote.

There’s a crowded field of candidates running or considering the race for Kansas governor in 2018, and that means they’ll need to find ways to set themselves apart.

AP PHOTO

In his State of the State address Thursday, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper proposed boosting rural access to high-speed Internet.

To boost economic development in rural areas, one of the governor’s proposals is to create an office focused on expanding broadband Internet access to the 30 percent or so rural households in the state that don’t have it, with an overall goal of ensuring that 100 percent of rural houses have it by 2020.

Some big names in Colorado politics are already eyeing the 2018 governor’s race.

Will Rick Perry's name be missing from Texas ballots for the first time in 25 years? It seems to be anybody's guess, say Texas insiders.