hard red wheat

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Kansas’ hard red winter wheat crop is projected to be around 281 million bushels – about 185 million bushels less than last year’s crop.

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U.S. wheat futures increased more than 2 percent Monday as frost across key growing regions stoked fears of widespread production losses, pushing prices to a six-week high.

As Reuters reports, at one point Monday, wheat futures on the Chicago Board of Trade rose to $4.43 a bushel, the highest since March 10.

Andrew Woodhouse, grains analyst at Advance Trading in Australasia, said with frost through Kansas, Colorado, and Oklahoma, the market is concerned about crop damage.

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Wheat farmers have historically used grain futures to hedge against low grain prices, but many are losing faith in the tactic.

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The arctic blast this weekend that dropped temperatures in much of the High Plains below the zero-degree mark may have damaged some of the winter wheat crop.

Brian McGuirk / Flickr Creative Commons

The Wheat Quality Council’s annual hard red winter tour began last week across the High Plains, reports High Plains/Midwest Ag Journal. The event was founded in 1938 with the goal of improving wheat quality in the US. The tour posted a record number of stops this year—and finished up with some good news. 2016 showed the best day one yield result in four years.

A Kansas-based study comparing results on almost 30 years of winter wheat trials across the state points researchers to say global warming will cut wheat yields. Wheat demand is expected to increase by 60 percent by 2050 to meet population demands. A lead author of the study says one way of adapting the world to warming temperatures maybe be to shift wheat farming more toward the poles.

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

A new wheat variety may have cracked the code to marry the fluffiness of white bread with whole grain nutrition.

For a long time, American bread makers have been in a bind. Many consumers like the texture and taste of white bread, but want the nutritional benefits of whole grains.