Hispanic vote

Ryan Poppe / Texas Public Radio

Latinos make up 17 percent of the U.S. population. But they only hold one percent of elected offices, reports Texas Standard.

And one group is hoping to change that. The Latino Victory Project’s goal is to develop a pipeline of Hispanic leaders to run for future open seats. These Latino elected officials will then address policy issues important to the Hispanic community.

Tamir Kalifa / AP photo

With its controversial voter ID law, Texas has become ground zero for the battle over who should be allowed to vote. But now, reports The New York Times, the US Supreme Court has made the voting issue in the state even more controversial.

John Moore / Getty Images/Guardian

Last week a group of Hispanic voters urged the United States Supreme Court to block Texas from enforcing its voter ID law, says NBC News.  Lawyers for the League of United Latin American Citizens were joined by one of the state’s Democratic lawmakers, Rep. Marc Veasy of Fort Worth. The legislation requires a photo ID to vote but limits the permissible forms of identification.

David Zalubowski / AP photo

The number of eligible Latino voters will hit a record high this year.

David Scott Holloway / CNN/EPA

An editorial in The Guardian posed an interesting question last week. Most Hispanics vote Democrat, so why are so many Hispanic politicians Republican? Cindy Casares, a columnist for the Texas Observer, says it sometimes comes down to nationality.

Marjorie Cotera / Jennifer Whitney / Callie Richmond / Spencer Selvidge

Spanish-speakers now make up nearly one-third of the population of Texas, and political observes say that's an important factor for politicians to consider during the upcoming 2014 election season.