HPPR Arts, Culture & History

History:
prehistory
Native American history
early exploration
trails and railroads
homesteading
community settlement
farming & farm life
Dust Bowl era
ghost towns
personal remembrances & biographies

Culture:
ethnic groups
religion
language
cuisine
traditions
values
folklore
myths
humor

Arts:
literature
folk art
visual arts
music
theatre
events & festivals

Courtesy / Fort Wallace Museum

The history of northwest Kansas is rich with significance and in July, it will be on full display, as the Fort Wallace Memorial Association hosts a four-day event highlighting the history of the Plains Indian Wars and settlement of the region – an event that is expected to draw as many as 500 historians.

With the first of May arriving this week, I thought it an apt time to pause and reflect on the historical traditions associated with the special day. From a Red Square affair to a celebration of weather fair, May Day has been associated with a variety of rites and rituals.

amazon.com

A new book about a troubling episode in Oklahoma’s history is drawing a good deal of attention from critics. Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI is an incisive investigation into the mass murder of Osage Indians in Oklahoma—natives who were put to death so that their oil could be confiscated by white speculators.

High Plains Public Radio is thrilled to present THREE AMAZING FOLK MUSICIANS, live at the HPPR Studio - Amarillo (104 SW 6th Ave., Basement). 

This exclusive, first-ever pop-up showcase features three Oklahoma-based folk singers: LEVI PARHAM, LAUREN BARTH, & JESSE AYCOCK!

HAPPY HOUR! Tuesday, May 9TH ~ 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM CDT ~ HPPR Studios – Amarillo (104 SW 6th Ave., Basement)

Suggested donation: $15.

Kansas ranks as not-so-fun state

May 2, 2017
kansas.gov

While many who actually live in Kansas would disagree, a new ranking has found that Kansas is not a fun state.

As the Wichita Eagle reports, according to a ranking of the “most fun states in America” released by personal finance website Wallet Hub, Kansas ranked 43rd behind Virginia, Indiana, Arkansas, Kentucky, Alabama, West Virginia and last-place Mississippi.

CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER

SATURDAY NIGHT, 4/29! LIVE IN GARDEN CITY!

Don't miss the Band of Lovers, live in Garden City on Saturday, April 29th at HPPR Studios – Garden City! They're touring their NEW ALBUM, so come out and hear the new tunes!

CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER

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National Park Service

Southeast Colorado’s Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site was dedicated April 28th, 2007 with the goal of educating the public about the 1864 massacre of over 230 men, women and children of the Cheyenne and Arapahoe tribes by units of the United States Army.

The site is hosting the following events over the next three days in commemoration of its 10th anniversary:

HPPR Living Room Concerts presents

Gabrielle Louise - Live in Concert

Chalice Abbey, Amarillo

(2717 Stanley Street)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested Donation: $15

Hosted by Chalice Abbey & Evocation Coffee

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Gabrielle Louise is a nationally-touring, Colorado-based troubadour noted for her poignant lyrics and lush voice. The daughter of two vagabond musicians, Gabrielle inherited the predisposition to wanderlust and song. 

Water Conservaton & Preservation

Apr 24, 2017
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

In Dune, water is a precious resource on the verge of extinction. Throughout the book, consequences is a rigid and hard concept. Therefore preserving and conserving water is critical for survival to the Fremen people in Book I of Dune. The Fremen people have taken measures to ensure that any water, or moisture is preserved or reused. For example, the Fremen people have developed a suit called stillsuit and it is a very special suit, especially in the harsh climate of the Arrakis planet. The stillsuit will prevent the body from losing more than a tablespoon of their body’s moisture in a specified time period. Keep in mind the many activities a person does in a day to lose moisture, sweat, urine, exhaled air, organs, among other activities which averages to about 10-15 cups of water, per day. And this suit allows that moisture to be reused and loses no more than a tablespoon of body moisture per day. That is an amazing piece of technology that preserves and conserves the body’s liquid. Another practice by the Freemen culture to preserve and conserve water loss is salvaging the liquid from cadavers. While the image this produces is less than desirable, the point is being made of just how critical and precious water as a resource is on this planet. The premise around Herbert’s world of water shortage becomes very real and believable as you continue to read through Book I in the Dune.

Historians' efforts land Cherokee Trail back on Kansas maps

Apr 23, 2017
Patricia Middleton / The Hutchinson News

The Cherokee Trail is back on the map after years of being forgotten, thanks to the research of historians from southern Kansas.

Linda Andersen, a historian from Galva, first heard of the trail in 2005 at the Santa Fe Trail national symposium in McPherson, when two speakers talked about the trail.

"I had never heard of it before then," Andersen said.

A group known as the Friends of the Cherokee Trail — Kansas first met on Sept. 17, 2013.

My Dune Epiphany

Apr 21, 2017
Astronaut William Anders / Christmas Eve 1968 from Apollo 8

Some years after the Apollo astronauts took the first color photograph showing the earth rising over the lunar surface, I read the epic science fiction novel Dune. I was a lonely kid growing up in Southeast Kansas and I was drawn to the novel by its action. I didn’t understand the nuance contained in the pages of the dog-eared mass market paperback copy I carried around for weeks, but after reading and re-reading the novel in the years to come, I began to  its skillful depiction of politics, religion, and the fight for limited natural resources.

http://www.sandcreeksite.com/

The National Park Service is seeking volunteers to help with increasing visitation to the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Eads, Colorado.

As The Prowers Journal reports, the Cheyenne and Arapaho village was brutally attacked by units of the United States Army in 1864. The ensuing massacre of over 230 men, women and children caused a national furor.

Kansas Sampler Foundation

A Kansas staple is marking its final year in Winfield next month.

As The Wichita Eagle reports, The Kansas Sampler Festival, billed as the largest travel show in Kansas, is marking its 28th and final year as what started as a book-signing party for Milferd and Marci Penner’s “Kansas Weekend Guide” book.

Thoughts on Dune

Apr 19, 2017
JONATHAN BAKER / Canyon, Texas

I’m Jonathan Baker, a writer in Canyon, Texas, and I’ve been asked to talk a little about this month’s Radio Readers Book Club Read, Dune by Frank Herbert.

The novel is a sci-fi epic set in the far-distant future, in a time when a remote desert planet called Arrakis is the only source of the most valued substance in the universe, a mind-altering space-fuel known as Spice. The climate on Arrakis is so hostile that the planet’s sand-dwelling tribe, the Fremen, must wear stillsuits that recycle their own body fluids into water for them to drink. When the Fremen kill an enemy, it’s traditional to convert the body of the vanquished into water and drink that, too.

Life a Waste of Water?

Apr 17, 2017
Luqman Mohammed / Creative Commons

Leto Atreides mentions in a meeting he has with his trusted associates about how power has been acquired through using both air and sea, and now need to establish desert power, or specifically referred to as, “Desert Botanical Testing Station.” Interesting that author Frank Herbert would include alternative sources of power in a book about a barren planet with limited water supply. Can using alternative sources of power have any benefits to preserving and conserving water? The answer to that question is yes! Alternative sources of power have excellent benefits to preserve and conserve water. Alternative sources of power being solar electricity, wind electricity, Geothermal electricity, hydroelectric electricity, biomass that are being used nationwide. An example of how our current mode of obtaining electricity is tainting our water includes using fossil fuels to generate electricity because it creates air and water pollution. Not only does this pollution contaminate our water, our drinking source, but by drinking contaminated water it can cause series health problems. Alternative sources do not require water to operate. The consequences of this is two-fold in regards to benefits. Power sources that do not rely on water to operate means less water pollution, and reduced strain of competing for water sources with agriculture or livestock.

Free PBS Kids channel now airing in Texas panhandle

Apr 14, 2017
NPR

Texas Panhandle PBS audiences can now get the 24-7 PBS Kids channel on air and online.

As the Canadian Record reports, the free service features educational programming 24 hours a day, seven days a week, ensuring that the high-quality content is available to all children and caregivers on a platform and at a time that works for them.

Going it Alone

Apr 12, 2017
EMHKE

VANCE:   Hey! I'm Vance Ehmke and we farm in Lane County KS. Today Louise and I are going to talk about stretching water.

LOUISE: While most people in western Kansan would like to conserve irrigation water,can one man go it alone?

VANCE: 40 years ago I was up at K-State talking with ag economist Don Pretzer about ways to conserve the Ogallala aquifer. And he made a very good observation.

Waste Not. Want Not

Apr 10, 2017
CREATIVE COMMONS

Welcome to High Plains Radio Readers Book club, an on-air, on-line community of readers exploring themes of Water and Replenishment in our Book Club Series. Rediscovering an epic science fiction title, Dune, written in 1965 by Frank Herbert.

scgwynne.com

West Texas A&M University and the Center for the Study of the American West are welcoming a luminary of the American literary scene this Thursday night. S.C. Gwynne is the author of one of the most celebrated books ever written about the High Plains: Empire of the Summer Moon, a magisterial history of the Comanches and Quanah Parker.

It's the last day of our pledge drive, and we're thrilled to be featuring the community of Hays, KS.

We''ve got a giveaway, thanks to the generosity of High Plains artists MICHAEL JILG and LEON STAAB.

Their show, Eufloria, is from 4/7 - 4/29 at Garden City Arts in Garden City, KS. 

Renee Comet / Wikimedia Commons

After Sunday-Go-to-Meeting and Friday Night Football, Taco Tuesday is perhaps the most hallowed of weekly traditions in Texas.

But, as the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports, you might be surprised to learn that taco joints in the Lone Star State are forbidden from using the words “Taco Tuesday.”

Ancient Playa Lakes

Mar 29, 2017
FROM LOUISE AND VANCE EHMKE / Kansas Geological Survey

VANCE: Hey! I'm Vance Ehmke and we farm in Lane County KS. Today Louise and I are going to talk about playa lakes.

LOUISE: Here in this part of the state we are truly the Saudi Arabia of playa lakes because there are over 23,000 in western Kansas-the most in the world.

VANCE: We have mixed emotions about the playas. I don't know how many times we've had to pull tractors or combines out of them. And I can't count the number of crop failures we've had because of them.

LOUISE: But on most days we're thankful for them. If all we had were flat Harney silt loam soils, we'd lead a pretty plain life. But with the playas,we enjoy a lot of scenic and aesthetic breaks along with a greatly diversified flora and fauna.

Culture and Water in Dune

Mar 27, 2017
J. Stephen Conn (2009) / PhotosForClass.com

Welcome to High Plains Radio Readers Book club, an on-air, on-line community of readers exploring themes of Water and Replenishment in our Book Club Series. Rediscovering an epic science fiction title, Dune, written in 1965 by Frank Herbert.

Book I of Dune sets the scene of the political volatile environment between the Houses, specifically the Atreides House. Events of Barron’s well thought out plan to annihilate the Atreides House thickens the plot, and yet main character, Paul Atreides is a greater threat than the Barron is willing to consider. Barron’s perfect plan hinges on a traitor in the Atreides House, a traitor who becomes a wild card and this takes place on a desert planet caked Arrakis, a.k.a. Dune.

The HPPR Living Room Concert Series is pleased to present: TERRI HENDRIX & LLOYD MAINES, live in Amarillo on Earth Day!

Saturday, April 22nd

Chamber Music Amarillo's Fibonacci Space (3306 SW 6th Ave.)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p — Sugg. Donation: $15

RSVP online here, or call Jenny at 806-367-9088.

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April Showers

Mar 24, 2017
Janet Huelskamp - Fowler, KS

Hello, Radio Readers! Where have the books in our spring series Water and Replenishment been taking you?

Me? Well, talking about these books have made for some fantastic conversations! One example: some friends and I were noticing surprising similarities between Milagro Beanfield War and Dune. Sure, one is set in northern New Mexico almost 50 years ago while the other takes place on a desert planet 20,000 years in the future. But both show the ways that limiting access to a limited resource empowers a few and deprives many. William Ashworth’s 2006 Ogallah Blue: Water and Life on the High Plains documents the consequences of certain entrenched beliefs that some have a greater right to, a greater need of, water than others. Listen to the questions he asks: “should underground water be a public resource, as it is in six of eight High Plain states, or should it belong to the owner of the overlying earth, as in Oklahoma, or to no one, as in Texas?” He also wonders whether a standard of “beneficial use” should be applied when pumping ground water. Who defines that standard? Who resolves conflicts between competing needs?  These are the same questions at the heart of the fictional Milagro Beanfield War and of Dune, right?

Conserving Water in Hays, Kansas

Mar 22, 2017
JASON RIEGEL / City of Hays, Kansas

Ogallala Blue, Water and Life on the High Plains explains how groundwater mining of the Ogallala has become a way of life. How much water do we urban folk utilize, and what can we do to reduce groundwater usage?  Fortunately, a modal to answer this question exists in Ellis County, KS, the only KS County having more than 15,000 population, too dry to rely on surface water supplies and lacking a substantial aquifer.

For the 20,000 citizens of Hays Kansas, located in Ellis County, retaining a quality life has meant water conservation.  Comparisons by USGS of City average per capita water usage in gallons from 2009 to 2013 measures Hay’s water efficiency: Colby 294 gpc, Goodland  283, Garden City: 204, Liberal 188, Dodge City 175 and Hays 93 gpc.

HPPR's Living Room Concert Series presents The DustJackets - TWO SHOWS! (Garden City & St. Francis)

Shows @ 7p ~ Suggested donation: $15

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FIRST SHOW: Friday, April 14 @ HPPR Studios - Garden City, KS

RSVP HERE FOR GARDEN CITY!

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To our Crazy Beautiful fans in the HPPR area: 

 Due to restrictions on travel visas coming into the United States, Tommy & I regret that we are unable to travel to Amarillo, Texas for our 3/30 concert. It's truly beyond our control and we hope to reschedule for Fall. Please accept our apology for any inconvenience.    Peace, Tia

Full Circle or Not

Mar 20, 2017
SUSAN STOVER

Who owns the water, who speaks for future generations’ right to water and what comes after the Ogallala aquifer is gone? William Ashworth raises these questions in his book, Ogallala Blue, the High Plains Public Radio community read, as he ponders what a “post-Ogallala economy” will look like.

We likely won’t recognize the day when the High Plains states enter a “post-Ogallala economy,” as adjustments happen continually. Some changes are triggered when individual wells fail, producers age and get out of farming, or low commodity prices force hard decisions.  Other changes are being made by people with vision and opportunities to adjust their businesses to a long-term reality of less available water.  

Honest Questions

Mar 17, 2017
JONATHAN BAKER / Canyon, Texas

I’m Jonathan Baker, a writer in Canyon, Texas, and I’ve been asked to talk a little bit about Ogallala Blue by William Ashworth, the latest selection in the HPPR Radio Readers Book Club. The book concerns the Ogallala Aquifer, the vast body of groundwater that exists beneath the feet of High Plains residents and is sometimes referred to as an “underground ocean,” though it’s more akin to a sponge made of permeable rock and silt.

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