HPPR Arts, Culture & History

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Culture:
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Arts:
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Wikimedia

Windhorst, KS is one of those prairie communities that doesn’t exist anymore except for a lonely church and outbuildings.  Oh, there is a brown and white road sign pointing past a steep railroad track embankment over which the spire of the ornate church peeks 

I’m Kathleen Holt of Cimarron, KS and I’ve driven over that track to explore the historic church and outbuildings mostly because I am curious about the lives and dreams of those who built this impressive facility in – well, in the middle of nowhere it would seem.

Setting Fire to Music, Art, & Culture

Mar 7, 2018
Wikipedia

Erik Kirshbaum’s book Burning Beethoven derives its title and its central metaphor from a deeply disturbing image: American nationalists setting fire to Ludwig van Beethoven’s sheet music during World War One. It is an incredibly shocking image for music lovers and book lovers alike.

As Kirshbaum argues in the book, such acts of tomecide (or book burning) were carried out in First World War America explicitly for the purpose of suppressing the people who practiced German culture.

Scared by the Government

Mar 5, 2018
National Archives

In previous comments about Erik Kirschbaum's new book Burning Beethoven: The Eradication of German Culture in the United States during World War I, I considered how wartime Americans were taught to fear one another and how that fear short-circuited their powers of reason. I also spoke of the role the press played in fomenting that hatred.

This time, I want to take a look at the government's role. I have often thought that if a government can scare people enough, they will throw themselves at its feet. World War I provides compelling evidence for that conclusion.

KB35 / Flickr Creative Commons

Did you know you can travel the world without ever leaving the Lone Sar State?

The Houston Chronicle has published a list of worldwide landmarks that Texas has created its own versions of. For example, in Ingram, Texas, you can visit Stonehenge II and replicas of the famed Easter Island heads.

In Paris, Texas, you can visit the Eiffel Tower, and in Stafford visitors can visit an Indian temple that calls to mind the Taj Mahal.

Thoughts from the Author

Mar 2, 2018
Erik Kirschbaum / Used with permission

Hi, my name is Erik Kirschbaum and this is a story about a dark – and forgotten chapter of U.S. history.

Long before Americans ever had a taste of “freedom fries” there was a brief era a century ago when hamburgers were changed into “liberty steaks”, sauerkraut was turned into “liberty cabbage” and Americans got sick with a disease renamed “liberty measles” instead of “German measles”.

The Martial Adventures of Henry and Me

Feb 28, 2018
Kansas State University

This is Thomas Fox Averill, Topeka novelist, with one of my favorite Kansas books of WWI:

Over 100 years ago, in 1917, the premier journalist of Kansas, William Allen White, took a trip to Europe.  Along with Henry J. Allen, editor of the Wichita Beacon, who would become the next Governor of the Sunflower State, White was part of a Red Cross inspection team, this in the summer after the United States entered World War I, on April 6, 1917.

Free Press. Free People.

Feb 26, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

What is the purpose of a free press? Is it nothing more than the freedom of journalists to write and say what they want? Or is it to create a "fourth estate" that can act as a watchdog of the powerful? Both of those things are part of the answer, but I believe there is a third purpose, as well.

Legacy, Language, & Culture

Feb 23, 2018
By Louis Dalrymple / Puck magazine, Public Domain

I’m Joan Weaver, a resident of rural Edwards County Kansas, for HPPR’s Radio Readers’ Spring 2018 Read,  commemorating the 100 year anniversary of WWI.   

I have recently read Erik Kierschbaum‘s book, Burning Beethoven: The Eradication of German Culture in the United States during World War I

Reading this book has expanded my knowledge of the war to include a realization of a different kind of battle that went on right here at home.  

Wikipedia

I’m Jonathan Baker, a writer in Canyon, Texas, and I’ve been asked to talk a little about this month’s Radio Readers Book Club selection, Burning Beethoven by Erik Kirschbaum. The book is subtitled The Eradication of German Culture in the United States during World War I, and it contains a multitude of scary echoes for 21st century America.

I recall, back in 2003 after the U.S. invasion of Iraq, eating at a steak joint out on the Claude Highway near the Palo Duro Canyon. I ordered my New York Strip, but I hesitated about ordering fries. I simply couldn’t bring myself to say the words “freedom fries.”

Beware of Becoming What You Hate

Feb 19, 2018
Harry R Hopps / Wikipedia

I have often suspected that if people aren't careful, they become what they hate. How many times have you seen a hypocrite pontificate about hypocrisy? A bigot complain he or she is the object of someone else's bigotry? Or someone preaching tolerance harbor assumptions that aren't actually that tolerant?

It's hard for people to see themselves as others do -- there's a reason for that which I'll get to in a bit -- and because of that we sometimes wind up acting like the very people we most despise.

Poems from Above the Dreamless Dead

Feb 18, 2018
Ernest Brooks / Wikimedia Commons

This is Denise Low, a regular contributor to HPPR and 2nd Poet Laureate of Kansas. Above the Dreamless Dead: World War I in Poetry and Comics, edited by Chris Duffy, is one of the selections for this season’s HPPR book club. Today I want to look at some of the fine poems in this illustrated anthology.

Bound to Repeat It

Feb 14, 2018
Wikicommons

I’m Galen Boehm from Kinsley, Kansas, for HPPR’s Radio Readers Spring Read commemorating the 100th year anniversary of WWI.  I’m covering Kirschbaum’s book Burning Beethoven, noting how fear rather than reason too frequently dictates how we respond to political and personal concerns.

Prior to WWI, German immigrants to the United States established settlements to provide a sense of social and cultural identity.  These immigrants came for religious, political and vocational reasons.  

Freedom. Something We Give?

Feb 12, 2018
Pintrest

Suppose you were plucked from wherever you are now and plopped into a foreign country where you were told you are perfectly free. You are allowed to say anything you want, worship any god you want, speak any language you want, and make your living in any way you can. The only catch is, your neighbors don't agree. In such a scenario, are you really free?

This hypothetical situation is not exactly what German-Americans faced during World War I, but it still may help us understand what their story tells us not only about their freedom but also our own.

Let's keep the folk music going in 2018!

Our next show features two gifted singer-songwriters, together and live in concert. Caroline Cotter is a globetrotting polymath yogi from Rhode Island. Michael Howard is a grown-up punk rocker from Anchorage, Alaska. In other words, there's no way this show isn't going to be a BLAST.

Joey Survives

Feb 9, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

Howdy, I am Michael Grauer from Canyon, Texas,

Written in the spirit of Anna Sewell’s masterpiece of animal literature, Black Beauty, Michael Morpurgo’s War Horse tells the story of a “spindly half-Thoroughbred” horse, Joey, who is raised on an English farm and is “drafted” into service by the British Army to serve in World War I and his struggles to survive. 

GARDEN CITY! 

Don't miss Colorado-based folksinger RUPERT WATES, live in concert for the first time at our HPPR Living Room Concert Series! 

High Plains Public Radio was HONORED to be included in the Luck Reunion during South by Southwest 2017. Here are some shots from the front lines, and we had a blast working all of these artists into our folk/Americana playlists.

A special thanks to Meredith Fay Lovelace for shooting so many of these great shots. 

Sometimes, one's morning radio show gets REALLY CLASSY when classical performance musicians show up with instruments and an amp. And thankfully, "sometimes" was today!

High Plains Morning thanks our esteemed partners at Amarillo College for the live, in-studio mini-concert on High Plains Morning. It was our pleasure to host Camille Day Nies (viola), Tiffany McDaniel (violin), and Dr. Diego Caetano (piano).   

Two Kinds of People

Feb 7, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

When I began Michael Morpurgo's children's book War Horse, I didn't know what to think. Though I love historical fiction, animal stories were never at the top of my reading list, and I haven't read a children's book since ... well, since I was child as far as I can remember. Though the book was much-praised even before Steven Spielberg filmed it in 2011, somehow it had flown under my radar, and frankly, telling the story of World War I from the viewpoint of a horse sounded to me like a cheap gimmick.

From the Mouth of . . .

Feb 5, 2018
Pintrest

Hi, this is Daniel Helbert for HPPR’s Radio Reader’s Book Club coming to you today from Canyon, Texas.

For this installment about Michael Morpurgo’s War Horse, I want to think a little about one of the more distinguishing features of the novel: namely, that it is narrated by a horse.

The Importance of Chapter 15

Feb 2, 2018
Library of Congress

Hello, my name is Luke Hamilton, I am a junior at Colby High School, and I will be talking about Michael Morpurgo’s book, War Horse.

In this story, war is narrated by a staunch and wholehearted horse named Joey. Like Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms, themes like death, duty, companionship, and war are outlined throughout. But in stark contrast to Hemingway’s downplayed and existential storytelling, War Horse gives a more emotional and positive perspective. Morpurgo wrote this way to show his readers the humanity and hope that can exist in war.

DAH-DI-DI-DIT DAH-DI-DAH-DIT DAH-DIT DI-DI-DAH

Jan 31, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

I’m Kathleen Holt speaking to you from my home in Cimarron, Kansas.  My maternal grandfather was a quiet man who lived several hours away, so I didn’t know him very well. He described himself to us when we were kids:  ”T.I. Spence, sitting on a fence, trying to make a d9llar out of  15 cents.”  

I didn’t know much about WWI either, since we rarely made it that far in the history classes of my childhood.

No Man's Land

Jan 29, 2018

Hello, this is Daniel Helbert from Canyon, Texas. This installment of HPPR’s Radio Reader’s Book Club is about Michael Morpurgo’s War Horse—a novel that follows the journey of a farm horse named Joey who travels back and forth across the Western Front of World War I.

In what is unequivocally the central scene of the book, Joey has inadvertently wandered into No Man’s Land after being terrified by tanks, starved by the scorched earth of the battlefield, and mercilessly mauled by barbwire fortifications.

WWI Comics and Poetry: A Fine Example

Jan 26, 2018

This is Denise Low, a regular contributor to HPPR.

Dear Listener, first a confession before I discuss Above the Dreamless Dead: World War I in Poetry and Comics, edited by Chris Duffy. I don’t like comic books. My mother forbade them when I was a child, except for Bible stories. So, what mixed feelings I had when I opened this World War I book of poetry about a gruesome trench war. The word “comics” suggests humor, but Above the Dreamless Dead is in no way a humorous book.

bombcityfilm.com

On Tuesday night, 1,200 people gathered in Amarillo’s magnificent downtown Globe News Center for the Performing Arts for the premier of Bomb City, a film depicting the 1997 vehicular murder of an Amarillo punk at the hands of a popular “prep.”

The event was sold out, and the crowd consisted of an intriguing mixture of Amarillo’s elites as well as former and current punks, artists, and rabble-rousers.

Pintrest

I’m Jonathan Baker, a writer in Canyon, Texas, and I’ve been asked to talk a little about this month’s Radio Readers Book Club selection, War Horse by Michael Morpurgo. This spring’s Book Club theme is World War 1, but we decided to forego the novels on the conflict that you might have expected us to select.

You won’t find Hemingway or Ford Madox Ford or Erich Maria Remarque on our reading list. That’s mostly because anyone who’s interested in fictional recounting of the Great War has likely already read All Quiet on the Western Front and A Farewell to Arms.

Let's Be Honest

Jan 22, 2018
Pintrest

Hello, I’m Daniel Helbert from Canyon, Texas for HPPR’s Radio Reader’s Book Club. Joey, the horse who is the main character and the narrator for Michael Morpurgo’s novel War Horse is a spectacular and noble steed who has a noticeable emotional effect on humans that associate with him.

The Whole Wretched Mess

Jan 19, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

Hey, this is Andrew Taylor, a 17-year-old junior from Wheatland High School coming to you from Grainfield, Kansas.

War Horse by Michael Morpurgo is an interesting look at many different perspectives of World War I. At the center of these is a horse named Joey. Throughout the war, Joey trades hands from a farm boy named Albert to Captain Nicholls of the English cavalry, to being captured by German soldiers.

Heroism, Horses & Humanity

Jan 17, 2018

Hi, I’m Daniel Helbert from Canyon, Texas; I teach literature at West Texas A&M University and I research and write about the literature of the British Middle Ages.

For HPPR’s Radio Readers Book Club, I’m going to talk to you today about Michael Morpurgo’s 1982 novel, War Horse. The book bills itself as a children’s story, but—as its recent adaptations into an award-winning stage-play and film attest—it certainly has the potential to appeal to a much wider audience. 

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