HPPR Arts, Culture & History

History:
prehistory
Native American history
early exploration
trails and railroads
homesteading
community settlement
farming & farm life
Dust Bowl era
ghost towns
personal remembrances & biographies

Culture:
ethnic groups
religion
language
cuisine
traditions
values
folklore
myths
humor

Arts:
literature
folk art
visual arts
music
theatre
events & festivals

Nearly 150 years later, the Sand Creek Massacre remains a wound that has not yet fully healed.  This is evident in the recent closing of a permanent exhibit at the History Colorado Center in Denver exploring the 1864 massacre as part of its Colorado Stories section.  The closing was prompted by concerns of Cheyenne and Arapaho tribal members over aspects of the exhibit’s interpretation and the lack of prior consultation, according to a complete story in the Denver Post.  A reopening is pending the state and tribes reaching a consensus on the exhibit.

midatlanticnostalgiaconvention.com

Labor Day is the unofficial end of summer.  Here’s an idea to add to your end-of-season traditions:  the drive-in movie.  Remember?  The place with playground equipment under the big screen, the smell of popcorn on the breeze, and watching a movie under the night sky.   

Gifted Armadillos

Aug 23, 2013
superanimalwallpaper.blogspot.com

Sometimes you look at a creature and wonder how it evolved into the beast it is. The kangaroo and platypus come to mind, but they’re Australian, and who can account for animal adaptations down under? The critter I’m most curious about is one I see squashed all too often on the Texas and Oklahoma Interstates--the armadillo. Not long ago, I spied an immigrant armadillo flattened on I-70 in Trego County.

“Texas”… The Show Goes On

Aug 14, 2013
behance.net

As evening gives way to night, a lone horseman appears on the cliff above Pioneer Amphitheatre in Palo Duro Canyon.  He carries the Texas state flag.  Fireworks sparkle, the music grows, and a cast of 60 burst on the stage telling the struggles and triumphs of Panhandle settlers in the 1800s.  It’s the outdoor musical “Texas”-  a summer tradition in the nation’s second largest canyon for 48 years. 

Immigration Reform: Up Close and Personal in SW Kansas

Aug 12, 2013
Fernando Salaza / The Wichita Eagle

People value hard work in SW Kansas.  In an area where the unemployment rate is significantly below the national average, workers are needed.  The Wichita Eagle gave a glimpse into the struggles of being an immigrant.   

Artist: J. Keppler / Michigan State University Museum, Appel Collection

Two traveling exhibits, one featuring personal stories of Kanas’ immigration history and the other the role of caricature and stereotype in forming American values and attitudes about immigration, are now on exhibit at the Stauth Memorial Museum in Montezuma KS.  As part of the exhibition, a presentation and discussion on “Ethnic Labor and Small Towns on the Rock Island Rail Line” will be led by M.J.

Sean Steffen/Amarillo Globe-News

A fundraising campaign to sustain the Harrington String Quartet after a major loss of funding has raised a majority of its goal.

Stringendo, a West Texas A&M University project established in April to support the Canyon, Tex. classical music quartet, has raised $25,000 of a $35,000 goal in under four months, the Amarillo Globe-News reports.

amarillobotanicalgardens.org

The Amarillo Botanical Gardens is a shining example of the pioneering spirit of the High Plains.  The hail of May 28 destroyed what late frosts did not reported the Amarillo Globe-News

Take a Picasso Moment and Wash the Dust Away

Jul 30, 2013

Pablo Picasso - "Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life."

In the midst of summer, take a breath, pour yourself a tall glass of iced tea, and enjoy the beauty of Texas native, Kimbell McCurry.  McCurry is the featured artist at the 20th annual Western Art Show in Dodge City, Kansas.  His work is on display at the Landmark National Bank, located at Central and Spruce, through August 2.

Photo courtesy Louise Ehmke

Rolfe Mandel recently found a knapping pile and mammoth bones in close proximity according to The University of Kansas.  Mandel, a geoarchaeologist at the University of Kansas, says the closeness, as well as human artifacts, suggest humans may have lived on the high plains earlier than previously thought. 

The First Lady of the Texas Panhandle

Jul 19, 2013
Charles Goodnight Historical Center

Mary Ann Dyer Goodnight: First Lady of  the Texas Panhandle, wife of Charlie Goodnight, and to cowhands, "The Mother of the Texas Panhandle."  Myra H McIlvain recently told the story of Mary Goodnight in her blog.

A father with Alzheimer’s alone on the farm.  A swindling banker.  The school bully now grown-up as the local drug dealer.  A bleak, fictional town set in eastern Colorado.  The “unhomesteading” of the plains.  These are all elements of Greg Hill’s new novel East of Denver.

First Carnivore Dinosaur Tooth Found at Black Mesa

Jul 15, 2013
byways.org

Black Mesa is the highest point in Oklahoma.  Its name comes from a layer of black volcanic rock that coated the mesa 10 million years ago.  Located in the northwest corner of the panhandle, it's where The University Herald says Dr. Mark Micozzi found a tooth from the largest land-dwelling carnivores- theropods. 

Southeast Colorado Getaway Spots

Jul 14, 2013
Colorado Preservation

If Colorado is on your summer get away list, there are some interesting places to visit.  Colorado Matters recently asked listeners and travel guide, Doug Whitehead, for suggestions that might not be as well-known.  Some of the ideas are right outside our front door in southeastern Colorado. 

John Graham

The Amarillo Symphony last week announced Jacomo Rafael Bairos as its new musical director.  I sat down with the new conductor to ask him about his influences and his vision for the symphony.

Randall Derrick

June, 1874

The second Battle of Adobe Walls begins.

Chief Quanah Parker, one of the sons of captured white woman Cynthia Ann Parker, has been convinced by the tribe's medicine man his warriors are immune to enemy bullets.  They attack the Adobe Walls trading post, defended by buffalo hunters.  The medicine man was wrong.  Survivors include Parker and a crack shot by the name of William "Billy" Dixon. 

Amarillo Symphony Names New Music Director

Jul 3, 2013

Jacomo Rafael Bairos comes to Amarillo from Charlotte, N.C., and puts emphasis on making the symphony feel younger and more relevant.

Sternberg Fossils Go Online in 3-D

Jul 1, 2013
Hays Daily News

A joint project between the Fort Hays State University Sternberg Museum of Natural History and the Forsyth Library is bringing fossils into the digital age with 3-D technology.  The Hays Daily News reported Sternberg employees handle the fossils, while students photograph them at the museum.  Students return with the photos to the library to complete the 3-D process.  Scanning allows the viewer to rotate the specimen digitally, rather than looking at multiple photos.

Indiana Jones Author Debuts Latest Work in Dodge City

Jun 29, 2013

  Max McCoy is a well-known and award-winning author.  The Dodge Globe reported that McCoy, a Kansas native and professor at Emporia State University, will launch his newest novel, “Of Grave Concern,” on Tuesday, July 2, 2:00 pm, at the Long Branch Saloon in Dodge City, Kansas.

Folks, you get a couple Texans together, fishin' on a pond, and I guarantee the thing they'll be talking about as they head to shore is cookin' what's on the stringer.

Quentin Hope

Poet Mary Lee Hahn offers a short poem that reflects on tourists eyeing the High Plains from I-70 and defines "a good, soaking rain".

Benediction continues the story of the small, ever-changing, ever-the-same, town of Holt, Colorado. In "Plainsong," the picture of traditional family was shifted when two brothers took in a pregnant girl who became their "daughter." "Eventide," saw the community ban together to protect a family from a violent uncle. "Benediction," brings a minister from Denver to the high plains, who challenges the community's beliefs, and Holt will never be the same.

Vox Veniae, a church in East Austin, Texas, has discovered a unique path to blending people of different colors and cultures, as well as reflecting the place they live. The key? Being a good neighbor who engages and participates in the world. A great lesson no matter where you live on the high plains. Don't miss the video- Rev. Gideon Tsang shares insightful perspective.

There are Many Things to See in Kansas

Jun 8, 2013
kansastravel.org

Travelers across the High Plains often say there's nothing to see as you travel across this great expanse.  A recent article in The Wichita Eagle gave a list of 105 things to see in the state of Kansas that would argue that perception. 

Clutter Murderer Files Online

Jun 7, 2013
Kansas State Historical Society

Home should be safe.  It doesn't matter if you live in the country or the city, in an apartment or on a farm, the place where you lay your head should be safe.  No so for Herb and Bonnie Clutter, and their two children.  The Clutter family was murdered in 1959 by Richard Eugene Hickock and Perry Edward Smith a few days before Christmas in their farmhouse, outside a little farming town in Kansas called Holcomb. 

Refugees find home on the farm

Jun 6, 2013
Amy Mayer, Harvest Public Media

On a small farm in suburban West Des Moines, Iowa, even the barn is a refugee—an historic structure relocated from nearby Valley High School. The farmers, most of them refugees, are just starting to hoe the land, each one working a 50-foot by 50-foot plot where they’ll grow corn, beans, cabbage, eggplant, onions, tomatoes and peppers.

Unique Teaching Tool Found at High Plains Museum

Jun 3, 2013
High Plains Museum

If you google the galaxy planetary system made by The Thomas Kane & Company, you won't find it.  You will find information about their manufacture of blackboards, furniture, and maps, but not this interesting little galaxy gizmo made in 1881.  However, the one place you can see and learn about it is at the High Plains Museum in Goodland, Kansas. 

Smithsonian plows into farming history

May 29, 2013
Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

Visitors to the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. only get small glimpses of farming, such as a mural display of immigrant farmworkers planting crops in a 19th century California town. The museum once had an Agriculture Hall, but it was removed in 2006.

How many remember dancing in a circle while weaving long ribbons around a May Pole or making construction paper baskets covered with crayon drawings? Afterwards, flowers picked from the yard or a kind neighbor’s garden filled those paper baskets. Once you loaded your baskets with fragrant blooms, you sneaked from door to door to hang your homemade containers. At each house, you’d knock and then run like crazy to avoid detection. May Day was one of my favorite holidays from earliest childhood.

End of an Era

Nov 13, 2012

You get used to things always being there, maybe even take them for granted.  Things like snow at Christmas, Grandma sharing her wisdom no matter how old you are, Mom meeting you at the door when you pull in the drive, calling Dad when you have trouble with your car,  or driving to Herb's Carry Out for a burger and a piece of coconut cream pie.   Somehow, you're surprised when they are not.  November 21 will be the end of an era.  Herb's Carry Out, located on Kansas Avenue in Garden City, will be gone. 

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