HPPR Arts, Culture & History

History:
prehistory
Native American history
early exploration
trails and railroads
homesteading
community settlement
farming & farm life
Dust Bowl era
ghost towns
personal remembrances & biographies

Culture:
ethnic groups
religion
language
cuisine
traditions
values
folklore
myths
humor

Arts:
literature
folk art
visual arts
music
theatre
events & festivals

D-Day at 70, Remembering Ike's Finest Hour

Jun 5, 2014
kpr.org

Seventy years ago, the allied invasion of Normandy, France marked the beginning of the end for Adolf Hitler and his Nazi empire. 

How to can pork

May 23, 2014
Mike Pullen

 Howdy, Folks!

It's your ole buddy, Luke, and today we're talking to Mike Pullen of Frisco Spices.  He's walking us through the process of canned pork.  Take a listen.  If you have questions, Mike would love to talk you through the process. 

Summer reading inspired by the High Plains

May 18, 2014
tpwd.state.tx.us

From northwestern Kansas to the Texas Panhandle, the High Plains inspire the imagination of two authors.

Mike Pullen

Howdy Folks, 

It's your ole buddy, Luke.    Today, I'm talking to Mike Pullen, the owner of Frisco Spices.  

kansas.com

Today is the 60th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court decision ordering an end to segregation in public schools.  Governor Sam Brownback remembered Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka ruling by speaking at the former Monroe Elementary School in Topeka yesterday reported Kansas Public Radio

iheartfris.co

Howdy, Folks!

Today, I'm going to share my secret recipe for making fajitas when I'm camping.  

Film documents OK Panhandle ranch life

May 7, 2014

Filming is almost complete on a documentary that follows the ranching family of Jane and Bob Apple of Kenton, Oklahoma.

High Plains inspires Colorado artist

May 5, 2014
catherinescott.com

Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life   - Pablo Picasso.

A new exhibit at the Portal Gallery in Longmont, Colorado, not only provides an opportunity to wash away the dust of the past months from your soul, but it could also help you to see beauty in the abandoned places of Eastern Colorado. 

ravengrrl.blogspot.com

Only a Grinch could hate spring’s arrival. What’s not to like about warmer days, leaves unfurling, grass greening, tulips and daffodils bursting into bloom, lilacs perfuming breezes, and white blossoms exploding on Barbie’s wedding bush. This plant is really called spirea, but for little girls playing dolls, this shrub provides bouquets enough for a hundred wedding ceremonies--hence its nickname.

Stephen D/Flickr Commons

A 2002 study in the American Journal of Public Health found that men living in rural counties were much more likely to kill themselves than urban men. (Stephen D/Flickr)

An alarming number of farmers in the U.S. take their own lives, according to the magazine Newsweek. And while we don’t have great statistics, some of the best numbers available suggest men on the farm today kill themselves nearly twice as often as other men in the general population.

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

The blue corduroy jacket worn by high school students in FFA, formerly the Future Farmers of America, is an icon of rural life. To the average city dweller the jacket is a vestige of dwindling, isolated farm culture, as fewer and fewer young people grow up on farms. The numbers tell a different story however. In spite of that demographic shift, a record number of kids are donning blue jackets this year.

Last dance for Kansas Polka Lovers Klub

Apr 1, 2014
kansas.com

After 31 years, the Kansas chapter of the Polka Lovers Klub has schottisched for the last time to the steady oom-pah-pah beat.  Membership has been declining, volunteers willing to serve as officers were hard to find, and most dancers are over 70 years old.

wikipedia.org

St. Patrick’s Day has come and gone for another year. With the flip of that calendar page went the need to wear green and an urge to search lawns for lucky four-leaf clovers. The more common three-leaf variety representing faith, hope, and love symbolized Ireland’s most famous saint. Add a leaf to that trefoil and you get luck as well. Finding a shamrock with that extra something is the difficulty. According to some statisticians, only one in 10, 000 possesses the lucky fourth.

http://www.dirtycarart.com/

Recently, a friend sent me a link to “Scott Wade’s Dirty Pictures.”  It sounds like something that should make me blush; however, it is actually a site detailing a clever artist who turned his dirty car windows into canvases for spectacular drawings.  With recent snow melt and the resulting swampy driveway, I  wondered if I couldn’t save some money on canvas and take up sketching on our pick-up and car windows.

saidanotherway.blogspot.com

Here’s a challenge: can you tell the difference between handmade and machine made bread? Handmade means no mixers, no dough hooks, and no electronic devices of any kind until it’s time to pop those risen loaves or rolls in the oven. If taste buds can’t tell a significant difference, why would anyone choose an old-fashioned technique to do a job?

lilbitfarms.com

Like my students, I appreciate occasional snow days. Waking to hear a DJ listing my school on the school cancelation list reminds me of finding an unexpected twenty dollar bill in an old pair of jeans. 

In what may be called the apex of the symphony's vision to rejuvenate the traditional symphonic experience, the Amarillo Symphony's "Reimaginings" this weekend presents a concert full of reconception.

Project Trio, comprised of a string bass, cello and flute, joins the symphony, adding an eclectic flavor of musical styles to the concert.

Brooklyn-based Project Trio will be performing with the Amarillo Symphony this Friday and Saturday night at the Globe-News Center for the Performing Arts.

They stopped by HPPR studios on Thursday for a quick interview and performance. You can hear the interview and 2 performances above- the first piece is the trio's arrangement of Charles Mingus' Fables of Faubus, and the second is one of their own compositions entitled Raga Raja.

Amarillo Globe-News

Marvell Ervin White is remembered in Amarillo as a community organizer and community activist.

Among her most notable accomplishments include organizing for a community center in Amarillo's North Heights district. White was honored as co-founder of the Amarillo United Citizens Forum, which saw the Cultural Center built in the early 1990's.

The Wichita Eagle

Contrary to the impression you might get from some of the old Hollywood Westerns you may have seen, cowboys of the Old West were not all white men.

Amarillo Globe-News

One year after Amarillo was first settled in 1887, Jerry Calloway moved to Amarillo.

Recognized as Amarillo's first black resident, Jerry Calloway moved to the city with a white family from Georgia, living as a domestic in the home of his employer J.C. Calloway.

thefieldbrookreserve.com

One part of Eastern thought that intrigues me is the Zen  concept of intentionally living in the moment and experiencing that moment fully. I suppose that is a  major reason  why I enjoy the out of doors so much.  It’s hard to hike, camp, bird watch, fish, or hunt if you aren’t fully aware of your surroundings and the relationships of those elements with one another. Not long ago, I spotted a Zen rabbit on one of my walks, and it gave me much to consider.

amarillo.com

Matthew “Bones” Hooks was a trailblazer in Amarillo.  The son of slaves, Hooks is best known as a cowboy, an Amarillo civic leader, and the first black person to serve on a Potter County grand jury according to a recent article in the Amarillo Globe-News.

Hooks was also a leader in the religious community and a businessman, living in Mobeetie and Clarendon.  He worked to establish the North Heights subdivision in Amarillo.  Bones Hooks Park at North Hughes and Northwest 20th Avenue in Amarillo was named after him.

City dwellers take for granted easy access to services. With strip malls in urban areas sprouting like weeds in a wet summer, finding a groomer and pet care is as easy as taking a drive around a section is for me. During that four-mile drive in a city, people have to choose which business to support. In small prairie towns on two-lane highways where customers are in short supply, it requires ingenuity to figure out how to meet people’s needs and make a buck at the same time.

Happy Birthday, Kansas!

Jan 28, 2014
topeka365.com

The Path to Statehood

Kansas became the 34th state on January 29, 1861.  The journey to become a state was long and bloody.  The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 opened the two territories to settlement and allowed the new settlers to determine whether the states would be admitted to the union as “free” or “slave.”  

Cosmic Sand Pile

Jan 24, 2014
thezarembas.blogspot.com/

 Remember the joy you found digging in a great dirt pile or a big sand box when you were a kid? As youngsters, my brother and I spent hours creating our own geography, which included mountain ranges, deep valleys, sloping hills, and raging rivers. All we needed was sand, a couple of spoons or trowels, and water.

yanivdinur.com

Guest conductor Yaniv Dinur shares his thoughts on "Intimate Evening," the Amarillo Symphony's concert this weekend.

Soprano vocal soloist Sarah Jane McMahon joins the symphony for the concert this Friday and Saturday.

A Photo Journal of Low Times on the High Plains

Jan 16, 2014
RJ Sangosti / The Denver Post

RJ Sangosti spent the past year in high plains communities of Eastern Colorado.  It is a time of struggle for the region.  Years without rain are pushing changes in agriculture, the region’s main industry.  Farms are getting bigger, pushing small farmers out.  Young people are leaving to continue their education, and not returning.  Corporate stores in nearby cities are strangling main street businesses.  Housing values are declining.  

But, a handful remain-the hardy and determined ones.  Enjoy this photographic vignette of life in Eastern Colorado by RJ Sangosti for the Denver Post by going here.  

The Satanic Temple

The Satanic Temple started a campaign in December to place a monument of their own next to the Ten Commandments on the grounds of the Oklahoma State Capitol according to The Economist.

Maxwell Hughes is an award-winning guitarist based in Ft. Collins, Colorado.  He is currently on a tour of the southwest headed for California.

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