HPPR Arts, Culture & History

History:
prehistory
Native American history
early exploration
trails and railroads
homesteading
community settlement
farming & farm life
Dust Bowl era
ghost towns
personal remembrances & biographies

Culture:
ethnic groups
religion
language
cuisine
traditions
values
folklore
myths
humor

Arts:
literature
folk art
visual arts
music
theatre
events & festivals

Nick Hayes / Jonathan Cape

Many books have been written about Woody Guthrie and photographs of the Dust Bowl are recognized around the world. Now there is a graphic novel, Woody Guthrie and the Dust Bowl Ballads, that tells the story of Guthrie with imagined dialogue and stark, sepia colored illustrations.  

pettimes.ca

Our last dog came to us as a mature hand-me-down. Our daughter adopted him as a furry white puppy with appealing eyes. He was small enough to fit in her housecoat pocket. His mom was Shih Tzu and reportedly his dad was Lhasa Apso, so Dudley should have remained tiny and cuddly. Six years later, he weighs 45 pounds and comes to my very tall knee. While he isn’t purse pet material, he’s still lovable.

Luke Clayton

Deer season is well underway and I’m betting many of you have a freezer full of venison. What would you think is the most popular method of cooking venison? Maybe chicken fried steak? I’m betting the old standard fried backstrap or ham steak is very high on the list! I’ve enjoyed chicken fried venison since childhood and thought I’d share with you my method of preparing it.

Sand Creek Massacre Insights

Nov 27, 2014
indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com

150 years ago this weekend the Third Colorado Cavalry converged on the southeastern Colorado camp of mainly Cheyenne and Arapahoe people.  The troop of 600 killed about 200 people-- mostly women, children and older men.

blakleyhomeplace.blogspot.com

While living out of a suitcase has definite drawbacks, one of the bonuses of visiting new places is trying local foods. Because my family both moved and traveled a great deal as I grew up, I learned early the joy of sampling regional delights every time I hit the road.

www.secoloradoheritage.com

A national historic site in southeastern Colorado will become a virtual reality in the video game Minecraft.  The Immersive Education Initiative announced Bent’s Old Fort will also be reconstructed as a fully immersive 3D environment.

Find love and danger in Garden City, Kansas

Nov 18, 2014
Simone Beaudelair

A historical romance series has an unusual setting—Garden City, Kansas.  Simone Beaudelair starts the series with the story of a small town pastor and a church organist.  The author dedicates the book to the people of Garden City saying it was a wonderful place to live.  High Plains Holiday is the first installment of Love on the High Plains.  Simone Beaudelair is the pseudonym for a single mom and teacher now living in Texas. 

Luke Clayton

Well folks, today I’m sharing my favorite wild game barbeque.  It’s mouth-watering good.

Veterans Day: Of Soldiers and Families

Nov 10, 2014
kirk.senate.gov

World War I was known as “The Great War.” It officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on June 28, 1919.  Although fighting had stopped several months earlier when an armistice between the Allied Nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. That’s why President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

roadtrippers.com

Sometimes I think hunters use hunting as an excuse to get into the fields and woods. If they said, “I think I’ll spend day after day out-of-doors,” many of their friends and family members would wonder exactly what goes on in the woods or fields. They might jump to incorrect conclusions just because they don’t understand how time in nature renews a soul.

A little good news for the Colorado sole

Oct 31, 2014
Russ Baldwin / The Prowers Journal

Christmas came early for a bunch of Prowers County, Colorado kids.  They got a new shoes of their choice because of the Share the Spirit fundraiser held earlier this month at Amache Farms reported Russ Baldwin for the Prowers Journal.

Sand Creek Massacre Remembered

Oct 27, 2014
gsswdenver.wordpress.com

Condemned by Congress, the Sand Creek Massacre marked the plains with blood, sparking warfare from Texas to the Canadian border. On the morning of November 29, 1864, U.S. Army Volunteers attacked a peaceful camp of Cheyenne and Arapaho, mutilated the dead, and looted the village. The massacre left behind about two hundred Cheyenne and Arapaho dead and many more wounded, with women and children comprising two-thirds of the casualties according to articles from the National Park Service.

bgfons.com

Time travel has been the focus of many a story over the years and recently was in the news with reports about American scientists investigating its possibility during WW II. Michael Crichton explored the concept in his novel Timeline, which required rearrangement of participants’ molecules. Both of these examples are too daring for me, but I’ve found a way to safely journey through time that’s safe for my students and me. All it requires is access to old newspapers, which are available at a local library.

freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com

The scenery along   Highways 9 and 36 challenges many people’s belief that Kansas is flat and treeless. Even in western Kansas, the road undulates over rolling hills. Trees line meandering waterways that lead into either the Solomon or the Republican River drainages. This undulating, grass covered country makes it easy to understand why native inhabitants fought so hard to continue hunting and living in its sheltered valleys.

At harvest, corn huskers still pick by hand

Oct 16, 2014
Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media

Dick Humes squinted and sweat as he moved down a row of corn. He sliced through the husk with a metal hook in his right hand, snapped the ear from its stalk with his left, and threw it over his shoulder into a wagon rolling alongside him.

Hispanic Heritage Month: Emilio 'Dr. Cab' Caballero

Oct 14, 2014
amarillo.com

This is the final post honoring some of Amarillo’s prominent Hispanic leaders.  Meet Dr. “Cab” Emilio Caballero.  A Cuban immigrant, he came to Amarillo in 1937 hoping to play professional baseball.

It’s National Fossil Day

Oct 14, 2014
historylines.net

Today is National Fossil Day.  It’s a time set aside by the National Park Service to remind us about the importance of fossils, and why they need to be preserved.

Cindee Talley

When it comes to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), the United States is lagging behind.  Dr. Ed Berger stopped by the High Plains Public Radio studios, recently and shared that China has nine times, and India five times more engineering students than the U.S. 

AQHA

Budding artists recently had the chance to learn right from the masters.  Artists of the 2014 America’s Horse in Art exhibit at the Versatility and Art Field Trip hosted by the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum. 

This year, 141 middle and high school students attended sessions from Leanin’ Tree Greeting Card artist Jack Sorenson, nationally renowned artist Edgar Sotelo, and an up and coming artist, Randy Friemel of Hereford, Texas.

Hispanic Heritage Month: Rev. Jacinto Alderete

Oct 12, 2014
amarillo.com

The Rev. Jacinto Alderete didn’t know he was Mexican until he moved to Texas.  Born in New Mexico, he had never experienced prejudice before according to a recent article from the Amarillo Globe-News.

Karen Madorin

Instead of counting sheep to fall asleep, I count blessings until my eyelids slam shut.  On nights when slumber doesn’t come readily, my list grows more creative as I run out of obvious items to tally.  One item at the bottom of a long list of life boons is not just thankfulness for food to nourish my family, but for knowing the origins of my meals.

Jacob McCleland for Harvest Public Media

Fair-goers pack the stands at the East Perry Community Fair in Altenburg, Mo., on a warm, sunny Saturday afternoon. They aren’t here for the blue ribbon pigs, the truck pull or the beauty contest. These people are here for the fair’s biggest attraction -- the jumping mules.

Hispanic Heritage Month: Rita Martinez Sandoval

Oct 9, 2014

Meet Rita Martinez Sandoval, a woman who has dedicated her life to social work and community service.

Karen Madorin

That Thursday’s gusting winds did more than catch  arms and legs  in slamming doors, blow hair in directions it’s not intended to go, and make me tilt at a 60 degree angle in order to prevent joining a bazillion tumble weeds traveling hither and yon. It set my nerves on fire and prepared me to enjoy the perfect weekend to come.

amarillo.com

Retired U.S. Army Lt. Col. E.L. “Zeke” Navarrete was the first Hispanic elected to the Amarillo City Commission. Navarrete served two terms from 1983 to 1987 according to a recent article from the Amarillo Globe-News.

Hispanic Heritage Month: Belinda Gonzales Taylor

Sep 30, 2014

The celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month continues. Meet Belinda Gonzales Taylor.

sydnegeorge.com

Well, hello folks!

Today, I'm going to share a recipe that I made up in elk camp. 

Hispanic Heritage Month Profile: Ray Ruiz Rosas

Sep 25, 2014
amarillo.com

Ray Ruiz Rosas believed in giving back, and that’s the kind of life he lived.

amarillo.com

If you ask people what they remember about Praxedix J. “Joe” Dovalina, you’ll probably get the story about 1992. Joe paid over $3,500 in back taxes so a resident could get the deed to her house back.

Karen Madorin

While calendars tell us summer is over and fall has begun, hordes of giant dragonflies ride still-warm breezes and wasps hover over ripe fruits. Summer birdsong tricks us into believing there’s plenty of time for a second round of ripe tomatoes and okra or many late season dips in a lake or pond. The reality is that frosty mornings are not far off. It won’t be long before summer tunes are silent, insects and birds will vanish, green leaves will turn to dry husks, and ice will crust ponds and lakes.

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