HPPR Arts, Culture & History

History:
prehistory
Native American history
early exploration
trails and railroads
homesteading
community settlement
farming & farm life
Dust Bowl era
ghost towns
personal remembrances & biographies

Culture:
ethnic groups
religion
language
cuisine
traditions
values
folklore
myths
humor

Arts:
literature
folk art
visual arts
music
theatre
events & festivals

One Neighbor's Story - Looking Back

Sep 21, 2016
ESTHER HONIG / KCUR 89.3 - Harvest Public Media

Greta Clark serves at the Director of Multicultural Programs at Dodge City Community College.  In the course of her work, she hears the stories of many immigrants who’ve come to the U.S. in search of better lives, safety, and goals and dreams.  Here she talks with one student who’s made a career translating for the district court and for immigration. He states that he is independent and has a job helping people resolve their problems.

The Plains Belongs to Anyone Hardy Enough

Sep 14, 2016
KANSAS HISTORICAL SOCIETY

My name is Megan Hope. I’m a native of Garden City, Kansas, now living in Denver, Colorado. I’ve spent most of the last two decades working among immigrant communities, a path that has everything to do with growing up on the High Plains.  

As I was settling into grade school in the early 1980s, southwest Kansas was being transformed by an influx of Latino immigrants and resettled Southeast Asian refugees, the primary workforce for two new meatpacking plants.

HPPR’s Living Room Concert Series

Presents High Plains folk music icon,

RANDY PALMER

HPPR Studios (210 N. 7th St.)

Garden City, KS

Doors @ 6:30p | Show @ 7p

Suggested Donation: $15

A Never Ending Exodus

Sep 12, 2016
SUSAN HARGAGE PAGE, North Carolina

In my own family History, in 1846 my great great grandfather Alma Helaman Hale was 10 years old when he lost his parents as they lived on the Missouri river near Council Bluffs, Iowa. Alma then joined the Mormon pioneers and with his three siblings traveled from their home to the Salt Lake Valley to settle with Brigham Young as he declared, “This is the Place!” One biography states “At this point we can only conclude that Alma became a man at the tender age of ten. There could be no idleness. The full effort of every person was needed just to keep alive.” In Sonia Nazario’s Enrique’s Journey she describes the immigrants as “facing north, toward a new land, a never-ending exodus.” (70) For many, this is a religious journey towards a land of new promise. Nazario describes some that bring “a tiny drawing of San Cristóbal, the patron saint of travelers, or of San Judas Tadeo, the patron saint of desperate situations” (70).

Tinta negra / Black Ink

Sep 9, 2016
XANATH CARAZA

Edit

Xánath Caraza reads two bilingual poems from her latest book Tinta negra / Black Ink.   In one she asks, "

What is a border? Created limits

cultures forced to turn their back

The Wichita Eagle

For many, Kansas brings to mind the image of flickering wheat fields. But the state has had more than its share of celebrities and luminaries.

The Wichita Eagle has published a list of 19 famous people—and 2 animals—that spent time in Kansas. Military leaders on the list include Colin Powell, who was once deputy commander at Fort Leavenworth, and George Patton, who was stationed at Fort Riley before World War I.

jasonboyett.com

An Amarillo author has written two books aimed at introducing nationwide audiences to the world’s religions, using everyday language. Jason Boyett’s latest book, on the 12 major religions of the world, becomes available today.

Boyett grew up Southern Baptist, but in school he became fascinated with religions different from his own. He says his main goal with the new book was to be fair, and he sees the work as an effort to explain rather than convince. “Every religion has something from which we could learn,” Boyett added.

Crystal Yates - Live in Amarillo 

Friday, Sept. 9th @ The Chalice Abbey

(2717 Stanley St. ~ Off Georgia & Wolflin) 

$15 Sugg. Donation

Art reception @ 6p  |  Music @ 8:30p

RSVP online or by calling 806.367.9088!

"Powerful." "Magical." "Inspiring." 

Mike Kepka / The San Francisco Chronicle

This month the US lost one of its great children’s authors. Joyce Carol Thomas rose to prominence through highlighting her experience as an African American in rural Oklahoma.

Thomas wrote books and poems for children and young adults that accented her heritage, work that eventually garnered he a National Book Award. She grew up working in Oklahoma cotton fields, and published her first book, Marked by Fire, in 1982.

The Road to or from?

Aug 26, 2016
JENNY INZERILLO - Amarillo, Texas

Towards the end of My Antonia, Jim Burden, at this point in the novel, a middle-aged success story, returns to Nebraska, determined to see his childhood friend, Antonia.  Her home is comfortably bucolic—ducks and geese quacking in the yard, cats sunning on the porch, young women laughing as they wash dishes. Sure, Antonia appears older than she is, and much older than Jim, but Jim admires her, noting, “whatever else was gone [of her youth and beauty, we suppose], Antonia had not lost the fire of life.” From Jim’s perspective, Antonia is “a rich mine of life.”

 

BAND OF LOVERS IS BACK!!!

Friday, August 26th - Live in Amarillo
The Fibonacci Space (Chamber Music Amarillo)
3306 SW 6th Ave. |  Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p
$15 Suggested Donation  

RSVP online here, or call the studio (after 12p CST) and we'll put you on the list: 806.367.9088.

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Sean Steffen / Amarillo Globe-News

This past weekend, young filmmakers in Amarillo participated in a harrowing competition. The effort was part of a nationwide contest called the 48-Hour Film Project. Actors, producers, directors and photographers from Amarillo raced around town, bringing their stories to life.

Library of Congress

The Great Plains is its own eco-niche with distinctive plants, mammals, birds, weather, and history that constantly evolve. Its human population is as dynamic as these other unique factors. Those of us whose families have lived here for generations understand the world Willa Cather describes in My Antonia. Our families lived her stories. When we read them, we wonder how we got where we are today.

Who Cares about What Happens in Nebraska? We Do.

Aug 19, 2016
Kansas Memory, Kansas Historical Society

To write about life on the plains might not seem like much of a risk today, but, at the turn of the last century, Willa Cather knew what she was up against when she made immigrant farmers – people she knew as a child growing up in Nebraska—her central characters.

Bill Blankenship / Topeka Capital-Journal

The Topeka Capital-Journal recently described the Kansas State Historical Society’s archives as “Kansas’s scrapbook.” In the society’s archive wing you’ll find 70 million pieces of paper. These include government records; unpublished letters, diaries and other materials; an extensive photograph collection with images from all of the state’s counties; and books related to Kansas history.

Lyrical Postcards in Willa Cather’s My Antonia

Aug 12, 2016

The essence of poetry is song, or lyrical feeling. How well Willa Cather understood the lyrical beauty of the Great Plains. She delights readers of My Antonia with poetic passages, like Jim Burden’s first look at Nebraska: “There was nothing but land: not a country at all, but the material out of which countries are made.”

We Are All Immigrants

Aug 10, 2016
Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation

When I learned that our Radio Readers Fall Read would be themed “Stories: Borders and Becoming,” I began to think about what that might mean, exactly. We all have family stories of our beginnings and becoming in this country.  Whether we’re descendants of German  immigrants, Irish immigrants, Mexican immigrants, Asian immigrants, we all “just came here” at one time or another.  We have that story of becoming in common.

Caldwell Banker/Denver Post

Late rock-and-roll legend Joe Cocker’s Colorado ranch will go to auction on September first, reports The Denver Post.

Why Read My Antonia?

Aug 8, 2016
ndsu.edu

HPPR listeners thinking about the theme of this year’s book club--Borders and Becoming--need to keep in mind that borders change to meet the needs of those who live within them. Over the last two and a half centuries, the parameters of the United States changed repeatedly. A modern day description of the contiguous states would include Folksinger Woody Guthrie’s first stanza of “This Land Is Your Land.”

Band of Lovers is back! 

When music writer Kate Bee wrote about their debut album, “It’s a golden road trip,” her words also reflect the band’s lifestyle. Born on the road in the fall of 2013, Band of Lovers has been living and touring full-time in their self-converted 1997 Dodge van.

Crossing Borders

Aug 5, 2016
Paul Phillips

Few of us have experienced the immigration process, but for we who have traveled, the border crossing experience is traumatic, going from the comfortable to the unknown. 

Ancient Seas to Borders

Aug 5, 2016
J.W. Buell (1889)

High Plains Public Radio will soon begin its Fall Radio Readers Book Club.  The theme this time is Borders and Becoming.  Here’s a brief appreciation of the unique land mass found in books which embrace our “wide-openness.”

Book Selections - Stories: Borders & Becoming

Aug 5, 2016

Plenty of memes and essays tell Facebookers, tweeters, and readers to live in the moment. In general, it’s good advice for a satisfying and contented life. However, learning about and understanding the stories of a certain place and people who lived and are living in that geographic locale add depth to our existence.

Radio Readers 2016 Fall Read

Aug 5, 2016

Join us for the HPPR Radio Readers Fall Read Stories: Borders and Becoming.  The books include Willa Cather’s My Antonia, Sonya Nazario’s Enrique’s Journey, and Dave Egger’s What is the What.  To let us know what you’re thinking about our diverse ethnic culture here on the High Plains, join the discussion on the HPPR Radio Readers  Facebook page or listen to the BookByte Features aired Monday, Wednesday and Friday  during Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

50states.com

Monday is Colorado Day—the anniversary of the day Colorado was admitted to the United States. In celebration, TheDenverChannel.com has published some facts about the Colorado state flag.

The flag as it appears today was adopted in 1911 by an act of the state’s General Assembly.

Agence France Presse / Getty Images

The Summer Olympics are just around the corner, and the Houston Chronicle published a list of 25 of the best all-time Olympians from Texas. One athlete from the HPPR listening area made the list.

Randall Derrick

Texas Panhandle independent filmmaker Randall Derrick will be releasing a film this weekend in Amarillo. The movie examines a mysterious and little-known incident in Llano history.

Perjury of Time explores the true story of a double mass homicide that occurred along the Canadian River about 1450 AD. Archaeologists excavating in the Canadian River flood plain near Fritch discovered a Native American burial that contained the complete skeletons of twenty-one men, women and children. Eleven skulls without bodies were also uncovered.

Luke Spencer / Atlas Obscura

If you want to excavate a shipwreck, you don’t have to buy a submarine and go cruise the Caribbean. You need only travel to certain cornfields in Kansas, as Atlas Obscura recently reported.

David Hawley and his team of explorers have an unusual focus: They locate and excavate 19th century steamboats—ships that sank in the Missouri river and now lie beneath fields of rustling corn.

American BBQ Secrets

Jul 15, 2016
Elena Heatherwick / Guardian

Texans take their barbecue seriously. So do other denizens of the High Plains, for that matter. Brad McDonald, an journalist from the South, recently set out to explain to the British readers of the UK newspaper The Guardian exactly how to go about making great American barbecue.

Caleb Long / Wikimedia Commons

While the nation at-large considers whether to limit access to guns, the conversation in Oklahoma is about whether to increase access. This urge to stock up on weapons is part of a long tradition of pro-gun sentiment in the state, notes News OK.

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