HPPR Arts, Culture & History

History:
prehistory
Native American history
early exploration
trails and railroads
homesteading
community settlement
farming & farm life
Dust Bowl era
ghost towns
personal remembrances & biographies

Culture:
ethnic groups
religion
language
cuisine
traditions
values
folklore
myths
humor

Arts:
literature
folk art
visual arts
music
theatre
events & festivals

FALLOU NDIAYE

Hi, my name is Fallou Ndiaye.  I am originally from Senegal, West Africa.  I currently live in Garden City, Kansas. My story of coming to the United States began when I worked at the Embassy in Senegal because Senegal is the long ally of the United States. The last three Presidents visited Senegal, so when I work there, they welcome you and greet you in a respectful way and give me visa to get my chance to come here in the United States.

When I came here, I learned that the opportunities are open to everyone – to everyone who wants to move up, they give you a chance to do it. So, every place since then, I work more than a decade. I was looking for a job and they give me that job, the same job they provide to everyone.  So, even if I don’t speak the language at that time very clearly to them, they help me.  They help me and guide me and train me as they train American people to do the job like everybody.

NEH.gov

West Texas A&M University in Canyon is celebrating the establishment of its new Center for the Study of the American West by hosting a lecture this Thursday evening. Award-winning Colorado historian Patricia Limerick will give the inaugural Garry L. Nall Lecture in Western Studies.

Steve Johnson / Washington Post

It’s not every day that a High Plains destination receives the royal treatment from The Washington Post. But last week the legendary newspaper heaped praise onto Palo Duro Canyon, calling it “Texas’ Best Kept Secret.”

Some people just don't know when to quit -- and for that, HPPR is thankful.

With more than 100 head of grass-fed cattle on his family farm in Buffalo, Missouri, you'd think Lyal Strickland wouldn't be tooling around the country with his guitar. However, you'd be incorrect. This guy loves pushing the logical boundaries of how much HARD WORK a human can handle, and then handle it all, he does.

Say What?

Oct 24, 2016
NPR

The third book in HPPR’s Radio Readers Fall read bears the enigmatic title of What is the What.  A collaborative effort between novelist Dave Eggers and Valentino Achak Deng, the novel is set, primarily, in war-torn Sudan.  Both Eggers and Deng have said that they believed the book needed to be written to share and document Deng’s experiences as among the millions dead and displaced by the Sudanese Civil War.  Both men were committed to creating a work that would document the culture of Deng’s people, the Dinka.

As Deng talked about his life, Eggers collected vast amounts of material—a couple years’ worth of conversations-- then struggled to organize it in a compelling way, one that didn’t play on scenes of horror and brutality in prurient ways. He considered various titles for the book – one was It Was Just Boys Walking and another was Hello, Children. Those titles, as Eggers has said, suggested a focus on Deng’s experiences during the war and in refugee camps in Ethiopia and in Kenya. But, Eggers has said, eventually neither title seemed right for the book.  After all, in Eggers’ words, by the time he and Deng were collaborating, “Valentino had been a man for a long time…and he and the other so-called Lost Boys were tired of being known as boys. The story of Valentino's life would need to be equally, if not more so, about the issues he faced [as a man].”  Eggers began to explore ways that the novel/memoir might be crafted to convey questions about Dinka culture and ongoing conflicts in Sudan and Darfur

( http://www.vadfoundation.org/it-was-just-boys-walking/), and, it would seem, the story of Deng’s time in the United States.

Don't miss a phenomenal DOUBLE CONCERT for guitar lovers across the High Plains! Two GUITAR MASTERS perform at HPPR Studios in Garden City, KS on Friday, November 4th at 7pm. 

Hiroya Tsukamoto and

Adam Gardino, with special guest Kelly Champlin.

Click here to RSVP online or call 806.367.9088.

A new book takes readers on a fascinating journey into the heart of the Texas Panhandle. In Walking the Llano: A Texas Memoir of Place, Shelley Armitage invites readers to consider the unique character and geology of the Staked Plains. The book is a treasure of photographs, anecdotes, musings, philosophical wanderings, memories, and historical facts, all told through Armitage’s engaging and heartfelt prose.

The Denver Channel

’Tis the season for ghouls and things that go bump in the night. In honor of the spookiest month, The Denver Channel has posted a list of five public haunted sites in Colorado.

Called “the best kind of singer-songwriter” by the Dallas Observer, Vanessa Peters has played more than 1,100 shows in 11 countries and has independently released ten critically acclaimed albums. She tours the US and much of Europe, where she has a strong fan base thanks to the albums she made with her former Italian band, Ice Cream on Mondays. (It's because in Italy, all the gelaterias are closed on Monday -- and Vanessa struggled. Oh, she struggled.) 

Marvel Entertainment / Hays Daily News

Kansas now has its own Marvel superhero, reports The Hays Daily News.

FASO is thrilled to present internationally celebrated concert violinist, Rachel Barton Pine for the 2nd concert in the Friends of Aeolian-Skinner Opus 1024 (FASO)'s 2016-2017 Concert Season on Sunday, October 16!

Concerts are held at Saint Andrew's Episcopal Church, (1601 Georgia St., Amarillo, TX). 

Can You Hear Me Now?

Oct 10, 2016
BBC

We’re talking about Dave Egger’s What is the What, the third book in HPPR’s Radio Readers Fall Read. Our theme is stories, and, in this novel, Valentino Achak Deng recounts his life.  Rather than presented chronologically, rather than moving linearly through time,  Valentino’s narrative is fragmented, episodic, largely retrospective. It encompasses twenty some years, beginning in the relative present of his working minimum wage jobs in various eastern and southern cities of the United States, then to his early childhood in southern war-torn Sudan to a disordered life in the US, then back to resettlement in refugee camps in Ethiopia and Kenya. The novel concludes as Valentino prepares for yet another beginning, another relocation. When I think about it, Valentino’s life is much about endings and departures as it is about beginnings and arrivals.  His story, like Enrique’s, like Antonia’s is comprised of hostility,  hunger, violence, and death, stories that seem impossible to bear.

One Neighbor's Story - Generations' Stories

Oct 7, 2016
www.cbc.ca

So, both my parents are immigrants from Vietnam.  Back in the 1970s, my grandfather was a police officer in Vietnam.  When the Vietnam War came around, the North had him put in jail because he was one of the government officials.  He spent five years and four months in jail.  They took him into the jungle for hard labor and stuff.  They spent a lot of time being poor because after the North took over the country since they were a Communist society they had all the resources and everything sold to pay off their war debts, so it was really hard for them to makes ends meet.  But, luckily my grandmother was smart about the whole thing.  She sold rice and stuff so, like before the North had a chance to sell off all her stuff, she sold it and bought gold and diamonds for it which was easier because the North also changed all the currency, so everyone who was wealthy suddenly wasn’t wealthy anymore.

Kelly Caminero / Daily Beast

Early last month, a Donald Trump surrogate threatened that if the New York billionaire wasn’t elected, the U.S. would have “taco trucks [on] every corner.” This prompted many Texans to say, “Sounds good to me!”

A beloved West Texas artist will be remembered this weekend by the West Texas A&M art program. Jim Harter was born in Lubbock in 1941, and later lived in Canyon and attended WT.

One Neighbor's Story - Uganda to the High Plains

Oct 5, 2016
Dodge City Community College

Mohammad Omar - Hi, my mane is Mohammad Omar.  I am from Africa, especially Uganda.  I am here since 2014, but I am living now in Dodge City.  I like Dodge City, Kansas, because we have a lot of work here.  Before I am working Tyson Food.  I start again Cargill Company.  Now I am working three years at National Beef.  So, we are happy to be here in Kansas, Dodge City.

The Fall Read - Refugees on the High Plains

Oct 4, 2016
www.humanosphere.org

As the Radio Readers move on from this month’s book Enrique’s Journey to October’s read, Dave Eggar’s book on the story Somali immigrants titled What is the What, we continue themes of separation from family, intense dangers in fleeing one’s homeland and eventual settlement and adjustment to life in the U.S. In the past decade, Amarillo has welcomed a large refugee resettlement program placing refugees from the likes of Burma, Iran, Iraq, Congo, Syria, Afghanistan, and Cuba among other countries.

High Plains Morning was recently haunted by the living ghost of Gabrielle Louise, who was traveling through Amarillo while touring for her recent full-length album release, If the Static Clears.

What Kind of Book is This?

Oct 3, 2016

Since August, Radio Readers have shared stories about borders and becoming. Our stories have been prompted by the books in our Fall read: Cather’s My Antonia and Nazario’s Enrique’s Journey.

The third book in this series is Dave Eggers’ 2006 novel, What is the What : The Autobiography of Valentino Achak Deng.  Recognized by various organizations as a “best” and “notable” book, What is the What is titled an autobiography, described as a novel, yet frequently classified as social history.

HPPR went to ¡GLOBALQUERQUE!, a world music festival in Abluquerque, New Mexico on 9/23 - 9/25. Given the eerie welcome from our drive into town, I had a feeling it would be spectacular -- and it was.

Here's a rundown of some of the incredible artists featured this year, including exclusive photos and videos of the performances. For the full festival line-up, please see the festival's website

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

The main components for an African-American monument arrived at the Texas capitol grounds this week, reports The Texas Tribune.

The monument is finally being installed after more than two decades of effort by lawmakers. The memorial was designed and built by Denver-based sculptor Ed Dwight. The bronze and granite memorial will celebrate more than 400 years of achievements by black Texans.

Today on High Plains Morning, we were thrilled to host SHEL, a Fort Collins, CO AND Nashville-based troupe of four sisters who have been writing and performing together since they were kids.

Currently on tour with their 2nd LP, Just Crazy Enough, SHEL wanted to high-five the High Plains -- so they stopped in to play us a few tunes!

As promised, here's the link to their delightful new video, "You Could Be My Baby."

Why They Come Here

Sep 22, 2016
ANNE HOLT, Edina, Minnesota

Following is a provocative story shared by a reader.  On Sunday, November 13, 2016, HPPR Radio Readers Book Club will be discussing thoughts about immigrants and their stories.  We hope you'll join us.

From Anne --

I know. You want me to shut up. I love you, but I don't care.

On this day two years ago, I, along with some of the best human beings I know, visited a wall with nearly 30,000 names of human beings who were killed or disappeared in El Salvador during the 1980s. And it’s said to be an incomplete list.

KFOR

A temporary exhibit at Oklahoma City’s City Hall this week is drawing attention to many of the state’s “Most Endangered Historic Places” in hopes of protecting these priceless sites, reports KFOR.

Our Neighbors - One Woman's Story

Sep 21, 2016
SUSAN HARGAGE PAGE, North Carolina

Maria:  I came here because I love this country.  I came here to see my sister.  I was in Mexico and I came crossing the river.  The Rio Bravo.  It was dangerous.  It was hard.  But I came here because the life is better than my country.  This is a blessed country.  I love this country.

I find good job.  I have a good life here because now I can help the people. When the people have problems, they ask me what they need to do to solve their problems.  Can I help them. 

Where I'm From

Sep 19, 2016

Hi, I’m Lynn Boitano in Garden City Kansas for the HPPR Readers Reader’s Book Club exploring the theme: Stories, Borders and Becoming.  Reading our recent book Enrique’s Journey I’m reminded of the indelible impressions that our families make on us through the daily routines, traditions, sacrifices and time spent together. 

All of these interactions accumulate to create our family story.  As a 6th grade reading teacher in district that’s rich in cultural diversity I’ve had the opportunity to get a glimpse into my students’ family stories and witness the strong bonds that bind families together across many cultures.

One Neighbor's Story - Looking Back

Sep 16, 2016
ANDREW REYNOLDS - Canyon TX

Marcos: My name is Marcos Morales Satino.  I am glad to share my story with Radio Readers Book Club.

Greta: Please tell us the about the life of your family that is still in Guatemala.  What kind of life do they live compared to the life that you are living today in Dodge City?

One Neighbor's Story - Looking Back

Sep 16, 2016
ESTHER HONIG / KCUR 89.3 - Harvest Public Media

Greta Clark serves at the Director of Multicultural Programs at Dodge City Community College.  In the course of her work, she hears the stories of many immigrants who’ve come to the U.S. in search of better lives, safety, and goals and dreams.  Here she talks with one student who’s made a career translating for the district court and for immigration. He states that he is independent and has a job helping people resolve their problems.

The Plains Belongs to Anyone Hardy Enough

Sep 14, 2016
KANSAS HISTORICAL SOCIETY

My name is Megan Hope. I’m a native of Garden City, Kansas, now living in Denver, Colorado. I’ve spent most of the last two decades working among immigrant communities, a path that has everything to do with growing up on the High Plains.  

As I was settling into grade school in the early 1980s, southwest Kansas was being transformed by an influx of Latino immigrants and resettled Southeast Asian refugees, the primary workforce for two new meatpacking plants.

HPPR’s Living Room Concert Series

Presents High Plains folk music icon,

RANDY PALMER

HPPR Studios (210 N. 7th St.)

Garden City, KS

Doors @ 6:30p | Show @ 7p

Suggested Donation: $15

Pages