HPPR Arts, Culture & History

History:
prehistory
Native American history
early exploration
trails and railroads
homesteading
community settlement
farming & farm life
Dust Bowl era
ghost towns
personal remembrances & biographies

Culture:
ethnic groups
religion
language
cuisine
traditions
values
folklore
myths
humor

Arts:
literature
folk art
visual arts
music
theatre
events & festivals

Radio Readers BookByte: Cross Country Recipes

Aug 9, 2017
Digital Commons / Massachusetts Commonwealth

Hello, High Plains Public Radio Readers!  I’m Paula Ripple from Dodge City, part-time cook, and lover of cookbook reading.  

Who doesn’t love reading cook books more than doing the actual cooking?  The Fall 2017 HPPR Radio Readers book choice, The Food of a Younger Land by Mark Kurlansky, takes us back to the 1930’s and the Works Progress Administration which provided work for writers.

Food & Story - Throughout Time

Aug 8, 2017
Smithsonian Virtual Tour / Smithsonian Museum of Natural History

I’m Wayne Hughes with a brief appreciation how we eat and its place in the hierarchies of food-taking, shelter seeking, reproduction.

In 1949, as he lay on his deathbed, Richard Strauss said to his daughter-in-law, "It's a funny thing, Alice...dying is exactly as I composed it in 'Tod und Verklarung.'"

This week on Amarillo Symphony Presents, we'll hear two monumental tone poems by Strauss: "Death and Transfiguration" and "Don Juan." 

Pi3.124 / Wikimedia Commons

Last week’s heavy rain damaged an important piece of Amarillo’s aviation past.

The English Field hangar, which opened in 1929 and was used for pilot training during World War II, was partially damaged by the downpour. As a result, the Texas Air and Space Museum has expressed interest in taking ownership of the site.

**** RESCHEDULED FOR SATURDAY, SEPT. 30TH! ****

  

***WOW, THIS EVENT IS CURRENTLY SOLD OUT! If you'd like to be on the WAITING LIST, please email Jenny at jinzerillo@hppr.org. If you have questions, please call HPPR at 806.367.9088.

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This week on Amarillo Symphony Presents, tune in for symphonic masterpieces based on timeless stories from other lands.

First, lose yourself in the "Danse Bacchanale" from the final act of Camille Saint-Saëns’s grand opera, Samson & Delilah. It’s based on the Old Testament's Book of Judges. (Lawrence Loh, conductor.)

HPPR Radio Readers Book Club is thrilled to announce our FALL READ, and this one will be yummy. Here's the lineup, so get reading! 

ATTENTION ALL FOODIES: Share your story about food on the High Plains, or review one of the books in our Fall Read! Our on-air Book Bytes offer a platform for voices across our region. For more information, contact Kathleen Holt

Courtesy / Fort Wallace Museum

In 1867, Capt. Albert Barnitz of the 7th Cavalry described Fort Wallace, Kansas as ”a little garrison that had become quite worn out” by the dangers and anxieties of the constant threat of attack from the Cheyenne, Arapaho and Kiowa tribes.

As the Hutch News reports, the Native Americans were protecting their prime buffalo hunting grounds against the travelers.

Wikimedia Commons

We here at HPPR want to wish our family of listeners a safe and happy Independence Day.

In honor of the holiday, here are some interesting facts about July Fourth, courtesy of Business Insider.

"As an artist, my goal is to remind everyone that we’re all here to take care of each other. As an entertainer, my job is to make sure we all have a good time doing it.”      

—Mudbone  

Today on High Plains Morning, HPPR listeners had the pleasure of a pre-lunch serenade and brief roots music history lesson from Mudbone.

Hear the interview and his live, in-studio performance at the link below.

abc7amarillo.com

As Amarillo gears up to welcome minor league baseball to the yet-to-be built stadium downtown, HPPR thought it might be good to help High Plains folks brush up on their minor league knowledge.

The Oklahoman

At the end of this month, Oklahoma’s state Capitol building will celebrate its one-hundredth birthday.

As The Oklahoman reports, the state has several events planned for June 30, to mark the occasion.

The Oklahoma Capitol building, located on over 100 acres in northwest Oklahoma City, holds 650 rooms and 11 acres of floor space.

Next to Kin / amarillo.com

The town square in Canyon, Texas, will be hopping on Thursday nights throughout June.

As Amarillo.com reports, the concerts will begin tomorrow night, June 8th, at 7:30 PM. Performing this week will be local Canyon favorites Next to Kin, led by the brother-sister duo of Danielle and Jeff Gerber.

Also set to entertain the crowds this summer, Amarillo alt-country faves Eddie and the Eat, as well as Jack Haney and the Geezers Gone Wild and, completing the series on June 29th, the Velvet Funk Band.

Are you a good witch or a bad witch?

Today on High Plains Morning, we had Scott Stine live in the studio to talk about the Bad Magik Musik Fest that takes over Sam Houston Park this SATURDAY from noon to 9p. It's famliy-friendly, dog-welcoming, and features community-minded local vendors, artists, food, and fun.

High Plains Morning was thrilled to welcome guitar instructor Homero Campos of Amarillo College and his students to play LIVE in the studio. 

First, we lined up the Suzuki Guitar Ensemble, with student ranging from age 8 to 16. These kids learn to play by ear, then they learn to read music. It's called the "mother tongue" approach, treating the music like a new language.

The students played three tunes: 

Meadow Minuet by Frank Longay

All my Loving by The Beatles

Since HPPR loves hosting brilliant artists who live in a van...don't miss HPPR's Living Room Concert Series as we present North Carolina's own folk-country dynamos, NIKKI TALLEY & JASON SHARP!

Saturday, June 17th.

Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley, Amarillo)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested donation: $15

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ALL RIGHT, High Plains! HPPR is thrilled to be hosting CARTER SAMPSON, live in Garden City, KS as part of HPPR's Living Room Concert Series. 

Wednesday, June 14th

HPPR Studios - Garden City (210 N. 7th St.)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested donation: $15

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Since HPPR loves hosting brilliant artists who live in a van...don't miss HPPR's Living Room Concert Series as we present North Carolina's own folk-country dynamos, NIKKI TALLEY & JASON SHARP!

Saturday, June 17th.

Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley, Amarillo)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested donation: $15

RSVP online or call HPPR at 806.367.9088. We can't wait to see you there!

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Courtesy / Fort Wallace Museum

The history of northwest Kansas is rich with significance and in July, it will be on full display, as the Fort Wallace Memorial Association hosts a four-day event highlighting the history of the Plains Indian Wars and settlement of the region – an event that is expected to draw as many as 500 historians.

With the first of May arriving this week, I thought it an apt time to pause and reflect on the historical traditions associated with the special day. From a Red Square affair to a celebration of weather fair, May Day has been associated with a variety of rites and rituals.

amazon.com

A new book about a troubling episode in Oklahoma’s history is drawing a good deal of attention from critics. Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI is an incisive investigation into the mass murder of Osage Indians in Oklahoma—natives who were put to death so that their oil could be confiscated by white speculators.

High Plains Public Radio is thrilled to present THREE AMAZING FOLK MUSICIANS, live at the HPPR Studio - Amarillo (104 SW 6th Ave., Basement). 

This exclusive, first-ever pop-up showcase features three Oklahoma-based folk singers: LEVI PARHAM, LAUREN BARTH, & JESSE AYCOCK!

HAPPY HOUR! Tuesday, May 9TH ~ 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM CDT ~ HPPR Studios – Amarillo (104 SW 6th Ave., Basement)

Suggested donation: $15.

Kansas ranks as not-so-fun state

May 2, 2017
kansas.gov

While many who actually live in Kansas would disagree, a new ranking has found that Kansas is not a fun state.

As the Wichita Eagle reports, according to a ranking of the “most fun states in America” released by personal finance website Wallet Hub, Kansas ranked 43rd behind Virginia, Indiana, Arkansas, Kentucky, Alabama, West Virginia and last-place Mississippi.

CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER

SATURDAY NIGHT, 4/29! LIVE IN GARDEN CITY!

Don't miss the Band of Lovers, live in Garden City on Saturday, April 29th at HPPR Studios – Garden City! They're touring their NEW ALBUM, so come out and hear the new tunes!

CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER

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National Park Service

Southeast Colorado’s Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site was dedicated April 28th, 2007 with the goal of educating the public about the 1864 massacre of over 230 men, women and children of the Cheyenne and Arapahoe tribes by units of the United States Army.

The site is hosting the following events over the next three days in commemoration of its 10th anniversary:

HPPR Living Room Concerts presents

Gabrielle Louise - Live in Concert

Chalice Abbey, Amarillo

(2717 Stanley Street)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p

Suggested Donation: $15

Hosted by Chalice Abbey & Evocation Coffee

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Gabrielle Louise is a nationally-touring, Colorado-based troubadour noted for her poignant lyrics and lush voice. The daughter of two vagabond musicians, Gabrielle inherited the predisposition to wanderlust and song. 

Water Conservaton & Preservation

Apr 24, 2017
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

In Dune, water is a precious resource on the verge of extinction. Throughout the book, consequences is a rigid and hard concept. Therefore preserving and conserving water is critical for survival to the Fremen people in Book I of Dune. The Fremen people have taken measures to ensure that any water, or moisture is preserved or reused. For example, the Fremen people have developed a suit called stillsuit and it is a very special suit, especially in the harsh climate of the Arrakis planet. The stillsuit will prevent the body from losing more than a tablespoon of their body’s moisture in a specified time period. Keep in mind the many activities a person does in a day to lose moisture, sweat, urine, exhaled air, organs, among other activities which averages to about 10-15 cups of water, per day. And this suit allows that moisture to be reused and loses no more than a tablespoon of body moisture per day. That is an amazing piece of technology that preserves and conserves the body’s liquid. Another practice by the Freemen culture to preserve and conserve water loss is salvaging the liquid from cadavers. While the image this produces is less than desirable, the point is being made of just how critical and precious water as a resource is on this planet. The premise around Herbert’s world of water shortage becomes very real and believable as you continue to read through Book I in the Dune.

Historians' efforts land Cherokee Trail back on Kansas maps

Apr 23, 2017
Patricia Middleton / The Hutchinson News

The Cherokee Trail is back on the map after years of being forgotten, thanks to the research of historians from southern Kansas.

Linda Andersen, a historian from Galva, first heard of the trail in 2005 at the Santa Fe Trail national symposium in McPherson, when two speakers talked about the trail.

"I had never heard of it before then," Andersen said.

A group known as the Friends of the Cherokee Trail — Kansas first met on Sept. 17, 2013.

My Dune Epiphany

Apr 21, 2017
Astronaut William Anders / Christmas Eve 1968 from Apollo 8

Some years after the Apollo astronauts took the first color photograph showing the earth rising over the lunar surface, I read the epic science fiction novel Dune. I was a lonely kid growing up in Southeast Kansas and I was drawn to the novel by its action. I didn’t understand the nuance contained in the pages of the dog-eared mass market paperback copy I carried around for weeks, but after reading and re-reading the novel in the years to come, I began to  its skillful depiction of politics, religion, and the fight for limited natural resources.

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