HPPR Arts, Culture & History

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Culture:
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Arts:
literature
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Dick Locke

A group of stargazers in the Sooner State are hoping to pass a law that would grant Oklahoma  an official state astronomical object.

Is This a True Story?

Feb 10, 2017
Kathleen Holt / Kansas State Historical Society

Hello, Radio Readers!  We’re talking about John Nichols’ Milagro Beanfield War as the first book in our 2017 Spring Read, Water and Replenishment.  Set in New Mexico, the novel explores the conflict between communities of haves and of have nots, who, in this story, are divided by access to water and water use.  On one side, are those who want a dam to create a lake for fishing and boating and to stimulate a business economy; on the other side are subsistence farmers who need water for irrigation.

You all may already know this, but I had to do some Googling through various sources, so bear with me here.  First of all, I hadn’t known that irrigation in New Mexico dates back to the days of Pueblo Indian farming, which makes irrigation an ancient custom, right? It’s just that traditional Hispano irrigation depended on river-fed ditches.  Farmers used shovels to divert water from one ditch to another and from ditches to fields.  Beginning in the early twentieth century,  many New Mexicans advocated for engineered solutions for irrigation, specifically large concrete dams and levees and canals.   While such water management systems are more efficient, they’re also quite expensive to construct and maintain. Conservancy, or taxing districts, were developed.  Historically, in New Mexico, many subsistence farmers, unable to afford the taxes, lost land owned by their families for generations or forfeited their rights to water access.

Desert Places and Desert People

Feb 8, 2017

Welcome to High Plains Public Radio Readers Book Club, an on-air, on-line community of readers exploring themes of common interest to those who live and work on the High Plains.  We’re talking about John Nichols’ Milagro Beanfield War, the first book in our 2017 Spring Read, Water and Replenishment

Published in the early 1970’s, the novel has since become a kind of cult classic, one revered by readers who enjoy a certain level of gritty realism, comedy, triumphs over greed and indifferent bureaucrats, and random gun fire here and there. Hmmm….sounds like fun, right?

Water Changes Lives

Feb 6, 2017
Boyd Funk / Holcomb, Kansas

I am Boyd Funk. I am a local farmer who has irrigated out of the Ogallala Aquifer all my life.  I usually think of water as a way to grow a crop, but to some people in the world, water has a different meaning. For the past 15 years, I have led a group that goes to rural areas in Central America. We build water systems that are simple and easy to maintain. We tap a spring high in the mountains, a spring that runs year-round, even in the dry seasons. The water is gravity flowed to the homes of the people. Trenches are hand dug and at least one man in the village is trained to maintain and repair the system. The water we provide is not for agriculture purposes but only for domestic use.

Is This a True Story?

Feb 3, 2017
KAREN MADORIN / Lost Dutchman Pond

Hello, Radio Readers!  We’re talking about John Nichols’ Milagro Beanfield War as the first book in our 2017 Spring Read, Water and Replenishment.  Set in New Mexico, the novel explores the conflict between communities of haves and of have nots, who, in this story, are divided by access to water and water use.  On one side, are those who want a dam to create a lake for fishing and boating and to stimulate a business economy; on the other side are subsistence farmers who need water for irrigation.

Kansas Geological Survey

Some of Kansas’s lesser known wonders are being featured on the Smithsonian Channel's 'Aerial America.’

One of those wonders is the chalk towers in western Kansas, featured in a four-minute video on the Smithsonian Channel's website, which describes how they were formed.

According to the video, the badlands, located in Gove County, were under a vast, inland sea where billions of creatures lived, died and left their bodies on the ocean floor in ancient layers of chalk.

Agua - Water Poems

Feb 1, 2017
Xánath Caraza, translated by Sandra Kingery

I am Xánath Caraza, and today I will read two bilingual poems from my book Donde la luz es violeta / Where the Light is Violet.

 

Agua  

 

Agua de las fuentes brota

con cada inhalación se adhiere agua de vida estás presente en las células del cuerpo y átomos.

Agua evaporada sofocas en este momento con el sol la densa atmósfera

en la que me muevo, agua que flota.

Agua que se abre, agua que salta.

Melodías de agua suenan en mi oído susurran viento, viento que se mezcla erosiona, que merma, hiende

se mete en la piel.

Emana a borbotones.

Me estremezco agua helada, agua sólida.

Deseos perdidos, agua recia, solidificados sentimientos, agua pétrea, tremenda pérdida.

“One of the best flatpickers anywhere.”

—The Huffington Post 

Beppe Gambetta - Live in Amarillo

Chalice Abbey ~ 2717 Stanley

Doors @ 7p  |  Show @ 7:30p

Sugg. donation: $15

***ALERT: This show is SOLD OUT. 

***To be put on the WAITING LIST,  call HPPR at 806.367.9088 with your NAME & PHONE #. ***

Milagros - Miracles

Jan 30, 2017
Karen Madorin / Logan, Kansas

Hello, this is Karen Madorin from Logan, Kansas, sharing her insights into John Nichols’ The Milagro Beanfield War for High Plains Radio Readers. Like any book worth reading, this one generates a gazillion not necessarily related ideas. One of those is what is a Milagro?

When Nichols wrote this novel based on his own experiences, experts in the publishing business told him he’d have to change the title so it didn’t have a foreign term in it. Naysayers explained the reading public didn’t buy such books. He didn’t follow their directions. Now plenty of people have enjoyed it and learned that Milagro means miracle.

If Only We . . .

Jan 27, 2017
Wayne Hughes, Amarillo

“Water.” Regardless who uses the word it means exactly the same thing in every language.  Without it, we perish before the sun sets on the sixth day without it.  When it is scare, hard to find, we abandon all other pretenses of civilization and seek after it with deadly determination, whether we’re alone in the middle of the desert or a mighty nation whose crops may fail in the coming spring.

Water and Replenishment

Jan 26, 2017
Karen Madorin - Logan, Kansas

Welcome to High Plains Public Radio Readers Book Club, an on-air, on-line community of readers exploring themes of common interest to those who live and work on the High Plains.  In this, our third Book club series, Water and Replenishment is our theme.   In our region, defined by low precipitation, few running rivers, and aquifers with slow rates of replenishment, water is in great demand.  Can we insure we have enough water -- for cooking and cleaning, for livestock and crops, for feedlots and plants, for reservoirs and swimming pools? for everyone?

“Civilization has been a permanent dialogue between human beings and water.” – Paolo Lugari (Colombia)

“Thousands have lived without love, not one without water.” – W.H. Auden

“Water, thou hast no taste, no color, no odor; canst not be defined, art relished while ever mysterious. Not necessary to life, but rather life itself, thou fillest us with a gratification that exceeds the delight of the senses.” – Antoine de Saint-Exupery, From Wind, Sand and Stars, 1939

From Sea to Desert to Today

Jan 25, 2017
Karen Madorin, 2015

What an irony that a landscape geographers and surveyors titled The Great American Desert first existed as a series of shallow inland seas. Over several geologic periods, vast waters supported varied marine life, etched inlets and beaches, while dissolving and depositing sediment. A hike through the resulting rugged hills and canyons reveals fossils that confirm this. A view of derricks and pump jacks sucking  compressed ancient life to the surface cancels any doubt about this terrain’s origin.

Studying Great Plains geology instructs that Paleozoic and Mesozoic waters deposited the region’s shale, limestone, and sandstone foundations over a period of 480 million years. Once salt waters dried, rains fell and channeled into streams and rivers that etched that soft stone landscape. It left what writer Harry Chrisman calls a ladder of rivers and streams connecting one watershed to another.

Wikimedia Commons

From Mexico to Canada and pretty much everywhere between, Time's Money has published a month-by-month guide to the best destinations for travel in, based on when the best bargains are in place.

This year, Time’s Money edition is basing the picks on taking advantage of currency shifts and travel trends to find travelers the best destinations to visit on a budget.

       LIVE IN AMARILLO!

Putnam Smith & Ashley Storrow
Friday, January 27th
 Chalice Abbey(2717 Stanley)

Doors @ 7p | Show @ 7:30p
$15 Suggested Donation
RSVP online or call 806.367.9088!

 

 

 

chroniclebooks.com

The American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture has named its annual “Book of the Year.” As the Farm Bureau’s website reports, this year’s award goes to Eugenie Doyle for her book, Sleep Tight Farm.

Wikimedia Commons

What better words are there to hear in the midst of bitterly cold temperatures than the Virgin Island wants to pay you to come there for a visit?

Wikimedia Commons

A Kansas-made film about a Kansas-made song will premiere later this month in Wichita.

Book highlights women's contributions to astronomy

Jan 1, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

National Geographic recently published an interview with the author of a book about the many women who made contributions to astronomy.

The history of celebrating the arrival of a new year

Dec 30, 2016

New Year’s Day and the name for the first month of the year, known these days as January, each stem from ancient Rome.

Several scientific breakthroughs made in 2016

Dec 27, 2016

From the moment that Einstein’s theory of gravity was proven when two black holes slammed together, to the discovery of a region of space where the temperature is right for liquid water, and by extension, life, 2016 was full of scientific breakthroughs.

CIA

History and geography buffs will rejoice at the opportunity to view once top-secret maps being released by the Central Intelligence Agency.

As the Smithsonian Magazine and National Geographic reports, in celebration of the CIA’s 75th anniversary, the agency has declassified and made decades of once-secret maps online.

Featuring Kansas author Thomas Fox Averill

Thomas Fox Averill, an O. Henry Award Winner, is Writer-in-residence and Professor of English at Washburn University of Topeka, Kansas;  where he teaches courses in Creative Writing and in Kansas Literature, Folklore and Film.  He has published four novels, one of which includes A Carol Dickens Christmas (2014).  

Public Domain

Few baby boomers can flip through old photo albums without finding black and white pictures featuring themselves, siblings, and cousins as youngsters. They often show off cowboy hats with stampede strings tied tight under their chins, fuzzy chaps, and belts holding plastic six shooters that fired red ribbons of firecracker-scented caps. Not many escaped that ache to ride the range on a stick horse or to rope sad-faced pups and kittens. Watching Roy Rogers, Gene Autry, and the Lone Ranger on those two-channel TVs fueled dreams and guided neighborhood shootouts.

Memories of Pearl Harbor, Japanese internment camp

Dec 6, 2016
Amache.org

The Amache Japanese Internment camp held over 7,000 Japanese – mostly American citizens – from 1942 to 1945 following the Dec. 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor that left over 2,400 dead and over 1,100 wounded.

Variety of religious holidays celebrated in December

Dec 5, 2016

If you’re searching for a holiday greeting that covers the myriad of religious holidays and observances celebrated in December, "Happy Holidays" really does cover it. 

According to 2016 Inter-faith calendar, the month of December is chock-full of holidays including those observed by Christians, Buddhists, Muslims, pagans, Jews and Zoroastrians.

mommypotamus.com

Despite the fact I had a flu shot the minute the doctor made them available, one of those germs invaded, took up residence in my ears, lungs, and sinuses, and has hung around with his buddies far too long. I’ve taken antibiotics and added a few homeopathic treatments to see if I can send this invader packing. Some of my self-care, which includes slathering Vicks on my feet and wearing cotton socks to bed, has offered comfort but not a cure. Several sympathetic friends recommended taking elderberry elixir, and one provided a bottle of his homebrew. When I looked up elderberries, it appears science agrees that syrups made from this native fruit have successfully evicted this nasty attacker and its accompanying symptoms.

Lynn Lane / Texas Observer

When folks talk about Texas cuisine, they often think of Tex-Mex or barbecue or chicken fried steak. But Lone Star chef Adán Medrano wants to make sure we don’t forget Texas’s first cuisine.

Medrano is a lover of what he calls Texas Mexican food. As The Texas Observer reports, Texas Mexican is the cuisine of the Mexican-American community of Texas, whose ancestors are the Native Americans who first lived here 12,000 years ago.

History.com

This holiday, here’s a little known story about Thanksgiving in America, courtesy of TIME magazine.

Many schoolchildren learn that the first Thanksgiving occurred between Wampanoag Indians and English Pilgrims at the Plymouth Colony in 1621.

John F. Kennedy even mentioned Plymouth as the site of the first Thanksgiving in a speech. When he made this declaration, a Virginia Senator objected, saying the first Thanksgiving was actually celebrated in Virginia in 1619, two years before the Plymouth celebration.

John Tlumacki / Boston Globe

Here’s a poem for Thanksgiving:

The Harvest Moon by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

--

It is the Harvest Moon! On gilded vanes

And roofs of villages, on woodland crests

And their aerial neighborhoods of nests

Deserted, on the curtained window-panes

Of rooms where children sleep, on country lanes

And harvest-fields, its mystic splendor rests!

Gone are the birds that were our summer guests,

With the last sheaves return the laboring wains!

All things are symbols: the external shows

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