HPPR Arts, Culture & History

History:
prehistory
Native American history
early exploration
trails and railroads
homesteading
community settlement
farming & farm life
Dust Bowl era
ghost towns
personal remembrances & biographies

Culture:
ethnic groups
religion
language
cuisine
traditions
values
folklore
myths
humor

Arts:
literature
folk art
visual arts
music
theatre
events & festivals

Fourth of July Fun

Jul 1, 2016

“Gramma, wuuuhms (worms), pops!” giggled my three-year-old granddaughter, calling from western Kansas. It’s July 3, so I realize her parents have taken her to buy childhood firecrackers such as black snakes and those little poppers that I, our daughters, and now our grand love to throw on hard ground. Sure enough, my little caller’s mother confirms that’s what happened. This is G’s first year to enjoy these holiday favorites, and she wanted to share her excitement.

Texas General Land Office

It’s about to get a lot easier to remember the Alamo, reports KTXA. The Lone Star State has issued new license plates depicting the San Antonio mission and battle site. Texans can buy a plate for $30. $22 of that money will go directly to the Alamo to pay for preservation efforts and historical educational programs.

4th of July Traditions

Jun 24, 2016

Add a bucket, crank, rock salt, ice, canister, milk, cream, vanilla, sugar, eggs, and arm strong power to take any summer celebration over the top. As a kid, I loved arriving at a gathering where men sat or knelt circled around a good size wooden or plastic bucket and each took a turn cranking a long metal handle. Oftentimes, a child perched atop the bucket to stabilize the turning device. I knew when I saw this, it didn’t mean the guys were just telling good stories. It meant we’d soon be eating homemade ice cream.

Emily Albracht / Texas Tribune

Last year HPPR reported on The Texas Tribune’s five-part documentary series God and Governing.  The series provided a fascinating look at how the decisions of Texas lawmakers are dictated by their faith. Now the documentary has been given one of the country’s highest journalism awards. This week the Tribune was honored with a national Edward R. Murrow Award for God and Governing.

Luke Clayton

Join Luke this week on High Plains Outdoors and visit with Debbie Hagebusch, Director of Tourism for the famous Y.O. Ranch in Texas  www.yoranchheadquarters.com . 

cpr.org

The Bison holds a special place in the hearts of Americans—so much so that it was recently named the official national mammal by the federal government. But in and around Yellowstone Park and the Grand Tetons, the bison often goes by a different name: lunch. As Colorado Public Radio recently reported, buffalo is a common site on menus around America’s most famous national park.

Sam Brasch / cpr.org

There’s a new massive collections facility beneath the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, and it’s a macabre masterpiece. The site contains more dead animals than most of us could imagine, reports Colorado Public Radio. Over its 116-year history, the museum has amassed around one million zoology specimens.

amarillo.com

A man who devoted his life to dance and the arts in the Texas Panhandle has died, reports Amarillo.com. Neil Hess joined the outdoor musical drama Texas in its inaugural year, serving as choreographer. He later worked his way up to directing the beloved musical, running the show from 1985 until 2001.

www.goodlifegarden.ucdavis.edu

Picking and shelling peas is a labor of love, not practicality. After three evenings bent over knee-high vines finding and shelling full pods, I conceded the payoff—healthy calories—doesn’t match effort expended. Some folks might wise up and start buying canned or frozen peas at the market, but they’d miss what some researchers call the intangibles.

   

HPPR is proud to announce our Summer/Fall lineup for the Living Room Concert Series, with shows in Amarillo, TX & Garden City, KS. 

The Vogts Sisters

Saturday, July 2
LIVE  in Garden City, KS

HPPR Studios ~ 210 N. 7th Street
Doors @ 6:30 pm | Show @ 7:00 pm

Please RSVP online, or call us at 806.367.9088!
Suggested Donation: $15
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Monkey Munches

Jun 1, 2016
leerichardsonzoo.org

I've been working for the past few month on a production to help raise money for the new Primate Center at the Lee Richardson Zoo in Garden City, Kansas.  It's given me an opportunity to talk with the keepers about what kinds of plants the animals need to provide both food and habitat.

oriooli.com

A phone call brings Karen one step closer to becoming the oldest generation.

sundgren.com

I recently overheard someone at an area coffee shop say, “The worst day of fishing is better than the best day at work.” I’m not sure I agree 100 percent, but any day with a baited hook tossed out, waiting for a nibble is a good day. You’re near water, catching sunrays, listening to birds twitter, and smelling that nose teasing scent of mud, water plants, and fish. If you happen to reel something in to put on the dinner table, it’s a bonus.

Provided photographs / amarillo.com

Last week in Clarendon, Texas, a crew of cowboys passed through town on a historic journey. The men were delivering pen pal mail to school children from Missouri to Texas. Their task was performed in the same way it would have been done over a hundred years ago. But the unique part, notes Amarillo.com, is the method by which they transported the letters. The cowboys made the journey in an authentic 1880 Butterfield Stagecoach. This was the coach’s swan song.

wordsforworms.com

A card from a dear friend inspired me to think awhile about all the quotes about gardens.  

I was surprised to find some of my favorites were about weeds, like this one said by Eeyore, "Weeds are flowers too, once you get to know them.  

I've also been fond of Luther Burbank's, "Flowers always make people better, happier, and more helpful;  they are sunshine, food, and medicine for the soul."

Or these two that made me stop, and consider carefully what my garden says about me:

Jack Williams |  LIVE IN AMARILLO

Saturday, June 4th

@ The Fibonacci ~ (Chamber Music Amarillo)

3306 SW 6th Ave. ~ 7:00 p.m.

$15 Suggested Donation

JACK WILLIAMS returns to Amarillo! 

As 200,000 miles click over, Nikki Talley just smiles.

After 3 ½ years of hard touring, with approximately 200 shows annually, Nikki keeps traveling on, bringing her gorgeous voice and thoughtful songs across the nation.

  If you asked Joe, the sole singer-songwriter of Williams Lost, his music combines “country cheese” and “bubble-gum pop,” with a hint of melancholy.  To the local listener, however, his sound evokes a straight-up, High Plains singer-songwriter aesthetic.
 

cubakansas.com

I’ve grown up hearing America called the melting pot of the world. If you spend time traveling Kansas, then you understand the Sunflower State is the biggest bubble in that boiling mess. In a few hours’ time, travelers can visit Lebanon, Denmark, Norway, and Cuba. During that journey, drivers can drop south to Glasco, named for Glasgow, Scotland. Kansas is a state of many cultures, evidenced not only by town names but also by buildings designed to honor old-country customs.

Carlos Pacheco / Flickr Creative Commons

If you’ve ever wondered where Texas’s first barbecue joint was, Daniel Vaughn may have an answer for you. Vaughn is the barbecue editor for Texas Monthly. His research has discovered what might have been the first-ever barbecue location in the Lone Star State. The location was in Bastrop, Texas, reports KUT. At least, says Vaughn, this is the oldest documented barbecue site.

Deb Oyler

The Radio Readers Book Club Spring Read concluded with a live two hour event on Sunday, May 1, 2016.  The panel discussed Kent Haruf's Plainsong, S.C. Gwynne's Empire of the Summer Moon, and Gail Caldwell's A Strong West Wind.  

The panel was:  Jane Holwerda from Dodge City, Kansas; Alex Hunt, Jonathan Baker, and Michael Grauer from Canyon, Texas; former Kansas Poet Laureate Denise Low, and Lynne Hewes from Cimarron, Kansas.  

Philipp Meyer: Getting to know the man

May 2, 2016
quotesgram.com

Philipp Meyer recently spoke at West TExas A&M University in Canyon, Texas.  Cindee Talley had the opportunity to talk with him on the phone, and get to know the man a little bit better.

Just Swingin

Apr 28, 2016
dailymail.co.uk

Once upon a long time ago, children played on asphalt or gravel playgrounds filled with tall metal swing sets and finger pinching chains. Those thick links froze little hands November through February and roasted those same palms July through September.

The Ada News

This week marked the 83rd anniversary of the first White House performance by the Chickasaw storyteller Te Ata. Te Ata was a graduate of the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma, reports The Ada News. She performed at the first state dinner of Franklin Roosevelt’s presidency in 1933.

McClean County Museum of History / Bloomington Pantagraph

One-room schoolhouses used to be the thriving heart of American agricultural communities. When children weren’t learning their three Rs, the buildings served as community centers and a town meeting place. Sadly, as reported by the Bloomington Pantagraph, most of these schools have gone the way of steam locomotives and wooden silos.  The closures began 70 years ago during the first wave of American public school consolidations.

The 2016 Spring Read Comes to an End

Apr 24, 2016
Kathleen Holt

Hello, Radio Readers!

You know, when friends at HPPR talked about developing a book series based on a novel about eastern Colorado, a social  history of the Comanche, and a memoir about growing up in the ‘60’s and 70’s in Amarillo, I was , well, intrigued…But, wow! Now that we’re about to conclude our series – A High Plains Sense of Place—I just don’t want it to end…

Author Philipp Meyer on Pioneer Myths

Apr 21, 2016
Library of Congress

The following is a transcript of the conversation between Dr. Alex Hunt and Philipp Meyer:

AH – For Radio Readers Book Club, I’m Alex Hunt, Professor of English at West Texas A&M University in Canyon.  Today, I’m speaking with novelist Phillip Meyer.  Your most recent novel, The Son, has been called a Texas epic.  What moved you to write a novel so engaged with Texas history and identity?

The Lumineers / cpr.org

Colorado indie stalwarts the Lumineers have had a breakout few years, vaulting themselves into the upper echelons of mile-high pop-folk. Their hits “Ho Hey” and “Stubborn Love” remain permanent radio fixtures four years after their release. Colorado Public Radio’s Ryan Warner recently spoke with frontman Wesley Schultz and percussionist Jeremiah Fraites: Here are some highlights from that interview:

On if they get sick of hearing "Ho Hey":

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