HPPR Economy and Enterprise

Agriculture:
crop production
crop irrigation
livestock production
dairy production
research & development

Energy
oil & gas production
wind energy
biofuels production
food processing
manufacturing

Transportation & telecommunications
rail service
air service
highways
internet service

Economic indicators & conditions:
workforce demographics
employment rates
land values
tax collections

Entrepreneurship:
small business development
technology application
innovation

The U.S. Geological Survey says a deposit in West Texas is the largest continuous oil and gas deposit ever discovered in the United States.

On Tuesday, the USGS announced that an area known as the Wolfcamp shale contains 20 billion barrels of oil and 16 trillion cubic feet of natural gas.

That is nearly three times more petroleum than the agency found in North Dakota's Bakken shale in 2013.

Forbes.com

Employers across the country are having trouble filling jobs, according to a new report from the Pew Charitable Trusts. These days it takes about 28 workdays to fill the average job vacancy. Ten years ago, jobs were filled an average of four days faster.

AP photo/The Oklahoman

There are very few corners of America’s oil and gas industry that are abuzz with prospects for a bright future these days.

But one of them is the niche market for dirty-water disposal in Oklahoma.

The market is worth about $3 billion, and as Bloomberg reports, Brian Kalt thinks he has it cornered.

Oklahoma Farm Report

Last week, Oklahoma’s controversial “Right to Farm” bill was defeated by voters. The state’s farmers and ranchers are now wondering what the short- and long-term effects of the bill’s rejection will be.

Meclee / Wikimedia Commons

As The Dallas Morning News pointed out this week, it’s possible that a Trump administration could cause oil prices to drop even further.

Trump has indicated that, in his first 100 days, he’ll “absolutely 100 percent” approve plans for the Keystone XL pipeline from Canada to Texas. The problem with this plan is, it will only serve to introduce more crude into an already glutted world market.

digitaltrends.com

With each year, the number of Americans who earn their living by freelancing increases. And as the number of people who work from home grows, so does the number of freelancers who are taking to the countryside.

According to an online study conducted for Upwork and the Freelancers Union freelancers now account for 35 percent of the American workforce. And of those, almost 20 percent choose to live a rural lifestyle.

oilprice.com

High Plains oil producers received a tough blow this week, as oil prices fell once again on a persistent oversupply of worldwide crude. 

According to OilPrice.com, recent data suggests that the world will soon touch a milestone rate of oil consumption: 100 million barrels every day. In a normal world, increased demand would mean increased profits.

WTAMU/amarillo.com

Colleges and universities on the High Plains are seeing increased enrollment in agricultural programs, reports Amarillo.com.

Houses are bigger and cheaper in Gurley, Ala. than in big citiesCredit Art Meripol / The Wall Street JournalEdit | Remove

Rural citizens might want to keep an eye out for an influx of techies in the near future. Many urban tech companies are leaving the big city and setting out for parts unknown—and that could mean a tech future for the High Plains.

Vasily Fedosenko / Reuters/Quartz.com

Now that the election is over, we can get back to focusing on what’s important in the world. According to Quartz.com, there’s a new device available that allows cows to text message their farmers when they’re pregnant.

Daniel Acker / Denver Business Journal

Car sales are continuing their downward trend in Colorado, the Denver Business Journal reports.

This September, new vehicle registrations were down by over 13 percent from the same time last year. This marks the second month in a row that Colorado has shown year-over-year declines in new vehicle registrations.

Federal Reserve Bank of Philadephia

Of late, the Kansas economy has been the worst in the country, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Wikimedia Commons

Beef and poultry operations nationwide are keeping a close eye on a ballot measure in Massachusetts, Politico reports.

The state ballot initiative, known as “Question 3,” would essentially ban inhumane confined animal-feeding operations. The law would require giving farm animals enough space to lie down, stand up, extend their limbs and turn around in their pens.

Has either of the two presidential candidates said anything about the Ogallala Aquifer?

As part of its ongoing ag reporting, Harvest Public Media reporters examine questions from readers and this is one of them.

We weren’t able to find any cases where the candidates specifically address the Ogallala Aquifer, but each has each spoken to sustainable water use - mostly with an eye to the West. (Neither the Clinton nor the Trump campaigns responded to a request for comment.)

oilprice.com

Texas’s crude oil output inched up in August to 2.4 million barrels per day. Analysts say this is the sign of a continuing—if hesitant—recovery in the Lone Star State.

All told, Texas is producing .5 percent more oil this year than last year. As a West Texas rigger might say, .5 ain’t much, but it’s somethin’.

Driverless Trucks, the Future of High Plains Highways?

Oct 31, 2016
agrilife.org

Could driverless trucks soon be driving along High Plains highways?

The world wheat market is showing signs of life, despite recent struggles.

Rural Blog

In today’s America, oversight and regulation of factory farms is extremely difficult, and in some cases impossible.

etfdailynews.com

Climate change could be having an adverse effect on natural gas prices.

As The Wall Street Journal reports, warm October weather has sent natural gas demand lower this month. Half of U.S. homes use natural gas for winter heat. But yhere simply hasn’t been a need for heat yet in many parts of the country.

Public Domain

Kansas’s unemployment rate has risen for the fourth consecutive month, reports The Lawrence Journal-World.

The jobless rate in the Sunflower State rose to 4.4 percent in September as the state lost an estimated 2,100 private-sector jobs.

Eric Kayne / The Wall Street Journal

The Lone Star State has long been seen as a boon to the U.S. economy. But as of late, reports The Wall Street Journal, Texas has become a drag on the nation’s fortunes.

It wasn’t long ago that the state’s energy resources helped keep the U.S afloat. The boom was led, in large part, by the fracking revolution. But ever since the collapse in oil prices, Texas job growth has become stagnant. And Texas has become something of an albatross.

David Paul Morris / Bloomberg News

Facebook wants to expand free Internet service in the United States, according to the Silicon Valley Business Journal.

The social media giant is working with rural Internet providers on a program called Free Basics. The initiative would give Americans access to a limited number of websites for free.

politico.com

This week U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced a $400 million federal program to reduce rural poverty in America, reports The Lexington Herald-Leader.

Smiley N. Pool / Getty Images/NY TImes

As the East Coast deals with the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, oil analysts are worried about the effects such a storm might have on the Texas oil and gas industry.

As The New York Times reports, few American cities are more vulnerable to hurricanes than Houston and Galveston. And none of the other cities are as crucial to the economy. A massive hurricane ramming into the Texas coast could have global economic consequences.

TheZachMorrisExperience / Wikimedia Commons

If you live in Freeport, Maine, your livelihood probably depends on L.L. Bean. Same goes for Bentonville, Arkansas, and Walmart.

And if you live in the small Western Nebraska city of Sidney, your life was probably thrown into a tizzy when it was announced that your hometown retail giant Cabela’s had been purchased by Bass Pro Shops. In fact, many in this Nebraska community of seven thousand are wondering what the future holds.

Creative Commons

Wheat is falling out of favor in Kansas, reports Farm Futures.

Wheat acreage may be reduced by as much as five percent this fall. That means, in the autumn of 2016, Kansas will record its fewest wheat acres in more than 100 years. Most of the decline can be attributed to low prices and a late soybean harvest. Wheat hasn’t been as profitable as other crops lately, and current prices show that trend continuing.

Texas Observer

Renewable energy has seen a boom recently. That means many landowners have been tempted to lease their acreage to solar companies. In many cases, farmers and ranchers have received fliers and letters from solar operations.

David McNew / Getty Images

The State of Oklahoma is asking its citizens to pray for the oil industry, reports The Week magazine.  The statewide prayer initiative will culminate on October 13th with a special breakfast event in the capital, known as Oilfield Prayer Day.

Creative Commons

The oil sector has seen gains recently, reports The Wall Street Journal, and reached a three-month high on Monday.

Prices have been rising on optimism spurred by an OPEC-production deal. After meeting in Algeria, OPEC leaders announced that they would coordinate a reduction of output to 33 million barrels a day.

Previous Image Enlarge Next Image 1 / 3 Sunday, Tulsa mayor-elect GT Bynum spent the day with Pennsylvania U.S. representative, Bill Shuster. He's the chairman of the House of Transportation and Infrastructure CommitteeCredit News on 6Edit | Remove

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