HPPR Environment

Awareness:
geography
geology
hydrology (water, aquifers, rivers)
flora
fauna (wildlife)
climate
weather
ecosystems
climate change

Management & conservation
water conservation
soil conservation
wildlife protection
policies & regulations

Luke Clayton

Jump in the truck with me and let’s head down to Lake Tawakoni, located about an hour east of Dallas. Tawakoni is a great fishing lake for many species but especially blue and channel catfish. We’ll join veteran catfish guide David Hanson (903-268-7391) and enjoy some fast paced catching in the shade of the brand new Two Mile Bridge. David is baiting the area with soured grain and cattle cubes and catching regular limits of good eating channel catfish in the 1.5 to 3 pound range.

Brad Nading / Garden City Telegram

The “Ask Hutch” column at The Hutchinson News recently tackled a question that many rural dwellers have wondered about: Can you really be struck by lightning while taking a bath?  As children, many High Plains residents were warned against bathing during thunderstorms. A group of meteorologists agreed that the odds of being hurt like this are extremely rare. But it’s not impossible.

Green Bean Therapy

Jun 29, 2016

Let's talk about the life cycle of green beans, learn a little history of the plant, and talk about my favorite variety.  I enjoy picking beans in the cool morning.  In the company of my cats, I let my mind drift to the past and search out the future, line out chores to be done, and sometimes I find lost perspectives.  Leave your day planner on the desk and come out to the bean row if you really want to put your life in order.    

Naveena Sadasivam / Texas Tribune

A new book by a member of a think tank in Texas insists that renewable energy creates “false hope,” reports The Texas Tribune. In a talk last week, Kathleen Hartnett White praised fossil fuels and called the advent of fracking “breathtaking.” White directs the Texas Public Policy Foundation’s Armstrong Center for Energy and Environment. While she spoke, protesters outside the event did their best to make their displeasure at her message known.

Luke Clayton

Join me this week and let's discuss catching and eating an often overlooked species of catfish, the bullhead.

There are three species of bullheads, the black, brown and yellow/, black being the most prevalent.

The Guardian

This week The Guardian posted an incredible timelapse video of a supercell storm developing in the skies over Kansas. Watch it here.

www.xerces.org

    

Today, Skip talks with Anthony Zukoff, and gets his list of favorite plants to put in your pollinator garden.  They are: blazing star, bee balm, golden rod, and milk weeds.

You can ask Anthony questions by searching for "Friends of Sand Sage Bison Range" on Facebook or by emailing him at: AZukoff@gmail.com

Troglodyte Miscue

Jun 17, 2016
learner.org

Kids love to find words that get under the skin of siblings or enemies. This term  gains power due scatological or other socially inappropriate connotations. For me, the word troglodyte, meaning knuckle-scraping Neanderthal, carried great import.. What could be more insulting?

Andrew Cullen / Reuters

Everyone knows that CO2 emissions are wreaking havoc on our atmosphere, leading to climate change. But there’s another gas causing even more trouble, and it gets less attention because it’s colorless and odorless. That gas is methane, and it’s a climate change powerhouse. In fact, methane is more than 100 times more potent than carbon dioxide.

J. Michael Lockhart / USFWS

35 endangered black-footed ferrets are being returned to Wyoming, reports The Topeka Capitol-Journal. The species was for a time believed to be extinct. Then, 35 years ago, a few of the critters were rediscovered in the wild on two ranches in the western part of the state. The Wyoming ferrets are just a few of the 220 captive-bred ferrets that will be released this year across the High Plains. Besides Wyoming, ferrets will be released in Montana, Colorado and Kansas.

Luke Clayton

Howdy, Folks!  It's your ole buddy, Luke Clayton, and I tell you, if you were to tell me 20 years ago I'd be fishing on Lake Fork for sand bass, I'd say you were absolutely crazy.

But, time changes everything, and today that's exactly what I'm doing with my buddy, Larry Large.  So, grab a glass of iced tea, put your feet up, and jump in the boat with us.

Swarm Season has beekeepers hunting for new hives

Jun 9, 2016
Brian Seifferlein / Harvest Public Media

From Harvest Public Media:

Late spring is swarm season, the time of year when bees reproduce and find new places to build hives. Swarms of bees leave the nest, flying through the air, hovering on trees, fences and houses, searching for a new home.

kshs.org

Today we'll talk with Anthony Zukoff.  He's an expert in Ecology, Zoology, and Entomology.  We'll get to know a little about the man, what took him from his roots on the East Coast to the High Plains of Southwestern Kansas.  

You can ask Anthony questions by searching for "Friends of Sand Sage Bison Range" on Facebook or by emailing him at: AZukoff@gmail.com

Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Two years ago Oklahoma was experiencing a devastating drought. Then came 2015. Last year was the wettest year ever in Oklahoma. And the rain keeps coming. The state has breathed a collective sigh of relief since the drought’s end. But many climate scientists are now saying “not so fast,” reports StateImpact.

Tanner Colvin / AP photo

Roughly fifty tornados were sighted in Kansas last week, according to The Wichita Eagle. The most powerful was an EF-4 that grew to a half-mile wide. The twister was on the ground for 90 minutes and its roar could be heard two miles away. This sort of activity is par for the course in Tornado Alley. Bryan Baerg, a meteorologist with the Topeka branch of the National Weather Service, explained: “It’s late May, so it comes with the territory.”

noaa.gov

The Washington Post recently published this video of a Haboob descending on the airport in Lubbock on May 29.

A haboob is a massive and intense dust storm.

Watch here:

Colorado Ski Country USA, Jack Dempsey / AP photo/ CPR

Though it may seem like summer to most, in the mountains of Colorado it’s still winter. Two prominent Colorado resorts have extended their ski seasons well into June, reports Colorado Public Radio.

About 120 acres of terrain will be opened to skiers and snowboarders this weekend at Aspen Mountain. Aspen also offered bonus skiing on Memorial Day weekend.

Luke Clayton

   In the 26 years that I have been writing this weekly outdoors column, I’ve come to learn thatmost of us that enjoy hunting and fishing also like to learn new ways to put the fruits of our outings to good use. We all have our special recipes and favorite ways to cook fish and game.

About six years ago, my friend Mike Pullen with Frisco Spices (www.friscospices.com) instructed me in the simple process of canning venison. Mike shipped me a jar of his Au Jus Base with instructions for making some of the tastiest canned venison imaginable.

Sandy and Chuck Harris / Flickr Creative Commons

From Harvest Public Media:

Monarch butterflies are disappearing. Scientists agree that in the last 20 years, populations of the black and orange insect have been in precipitous decline. But there's much less certainty on what’s causing them to vanish.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

If you didn’t know better, you might think Western Oklahoma was in the midst of an aviation renaissance. Of late, there’s been a rush to register private airstrips in rural areas, reports StateImpact Oklahoma. But these new landing areas aren’t planning to attract travel. They were created to keep wind turbines out.

Sentry Siren / New York Times

May and early June are the busiest time of the year for tornados on the High Plains. And that means many flatlanders are used to the sounds of tornado sirens in their neighborhoods. In our highly technological era, it might seem like tornado sirens have outlived their usefulness. But, as The New York Times reports, the sirens are still putting an old technology to good use.

Luke Clayton

Luke discusses fishing reports this week and how best to "glean" reliable fishing information that will help you catch fish on your next outing. Luke also shares a bit of humor concerning a fishing trip earlier this week when he thought he "had em' figured out!"

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media

From Harvest Public Media:

We all learned it as kids: Old MacDonald has a farm and on that farm he has a cow that says “moo.” But why? Why do cows moo?

Whenever I’m out reporting in the field I can tell many ranchers have a powerful connection with their cattle – they can almost understand them. But researchers today are trying to figure out exactly what cows are saying.

presbyirisgardens.org

My grandmother called them flags, they've also been known as "poor man's orchids," but this flower is hardy and just right for growing on the High Plains.

Bureau of Reclamation/NY Times

As the water crisis in the West grows more dire, many officials are realizing that the 20th century’s solutions are not sufficient for a 21st century problem. Many of the West’s big dams, reports The New York Times, are much less effective than once hoped. The massive structures have disrupted fisheries and left taxpayers saddled with debt. And—perhaps the worst part--these dams lose hundreds of billions of gallons of water each year to evaporation and leakage.

Luke Clayton

This week on High Plains Outdoors, Luke visits with Shawn Ballard, owner of Diamond Park Homes www.diamondparkhomes.com in Alba, Texas. Ballard's company builds tiny homes (399 sq. feet or less) and ships them all over the country. There is a boon in Tiny home living today. Tune in and learn all about this downsized way of living.  

CBS 4 Denver

Two High Plains states lead the nation in hail damage, reports The Denver Post. Over the past three years, Colorado ranks second behind Texas for the number of insurance claims filed due to hail strikes on homes, property and cars.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The Oklahoma House of Representatives has chosen a new leader to take the reins next year, reports member station KOSU. Charles McCall is a Republican from Atoka in southeast Oklahoma. It’s hoped that he will bring a unique perspective on water to the capitol.

Conservation Colorado

During this Colorado legislative season, GOP and Democratic lawmakers found little common ground between them. But they did find one issue they could agree on. After years of debate, rain barrels are now legal in the state of Colorado, reports KDVR.

Luke Clayton

The natural world is governed by cycles that repeat themselves in a pretty predictable pattern! We have learned much about the cycles or “patterns” of fish and wildlife. We know when to expect the whitetail rut or the crappie to move shallow. We fishermen have also learned when the time is right for catching trophy-size blue catfish or smaller fish better suited for the frying pan.

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