High Plains Public Radio

HPPR Environment

Awareness:
geography
geology
hydrology (water, aquifers, rivers)
flora
fauna (wildlife)
climate
weather
ecosystems
climate change

Management & conservation
water conservation
soil conservation
wildlife protection
policies & regulations

Loveweed

Feb 10, 2016
litreactor.com

This week we’ll revisit a valentine favorite as we investigate a parasite plant with a past history of telling fortunes and futures.  

By Leaflet - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.07 / Wikimedia Commons

If you enjoyed the massive amounts of rain most of the High Plains received last year, you may not want to get too used to it.  The weather patterns that brought moisture to the southwestern United States in 2015 were unusual. And these wet patterns have become more rare over the last 35 years, reports Colorado Public Radio.

Citizen Science: Bird Banding

Feb 9, 2016

How do scientists get the data they need to study birds? A lot of data is collected by volunteers, "citizen scientists," through bird surveys and bird banding. Bird banding is a universal and indispensable technique for studying the movement, survival and behavior of birds.

Luke Clayton

Howdy Folks!

This is the time of year when you're starting to plan your hog hunt to the great state of Texas.  I have some things I'd like you to think about when you're making those preparations.  

Consider how much time you've got- that will make a world of difference the type of hunt you'll want.  A reserve will take a lot more time, simply because if those hogs have any pressure at all, they're going to change up their patterns.

Take a listen to today's show, I've got some more insider hints to share with you.

http://smartercharger.com

The vast majority of air pollution is generated by a very small minority of industrial facilities, reports The Rural Blog. A new study has found that 5% of plants are responsible for about 90% of industry-generated pollution in the U.S. Researchers refer to these facilities as “hyper-polluters.” Almost all of the air pollution created in the United States is pumped out by roughly 800 industrial facilities.

Saving Amaryllis

Feb 3, 2016
culverslandscape.com

Recycle those glorious holiday plants and use them again next year!  It’s fairly easy to babysit these favorite flowering bulbs, first in house during the rest of the cold weather, then outside in the spring and summer.  Give them time to adjust to a new bloom schedule in the fall and they’ll serve you well next Christmas.

Prairie Plains Resource Institute

From Harvest Public Media:

From the air, the Midwest looks like a patchwork of cropland and pastures. But before the land was turned over to plows and center pivots, most of it was a sea of grass. 

Native grasslands were first plowed by pioneers homesteading on the plains. More land was converted to crops as tractors and machinery arrived on the farm and conversion of land intensified. 

Citizen Science: Mid-Winter Eagle Survey

Feb 2, 2016
Nigel / Flickr Creative Commons

When America adopted the bald eagle as the national symbol in 1782, there may have been 100,000 nesting eagles. But the eagle population declined, in part due to pesticides. By 1963, with only 487 nesting pairs remaining, our national symbol was near extinction.

Sue Ogrocki / AP photo

Oklahoma state officials set out a couple of years ago to find which buildings in the state were most vulnerable to earthquakes. Today, lawmakers are no closer to knowing which structures would be most likely to collapse, reports NewsOK. That’s because the team of experts the state hired never performed the work requested of them. The team balked out of fears they might be held liable should their predictions prove wrong.

Bonsai Basics

Jan 30, 2016
wikipedia.org

The unexpected arrival of a beautiful bonsai gift caused me to look back to a previous program on the background and basics of this ancient garden art form.     

cope-preparedness.org

Elvis wasn’t the only the person to note a whole lotta shakin’ goin’ on. Lately, it appears that even more of it is taking place. Kansas residents have experienced plenty of recent unexpected movement as the earth repeatedly shifts under feet and houses. This messes with people’s equilibria and generates questions.

Luke Clayton

 Howdy Folks!

In this weeks version of High Plains Outdoors, Luke takes us to Lake Fork to fish for white bass with his friend guide Seth Vanover www.lakeforkcatandcrappie.com. Seth is usually fishing the Sabine River this time of year for spawning white bass but the river is currently almost out of it's banks which making fishing tough.

The whites at Lake Fork are in pre spawn mode and biting like crazy. Seth and Luke will show you what to look for on your graph when targeting winter "whites" and, how to catch them.

 White bass are in pre spawn and holding tight to bottom now. A small Rat L Trap or slab worked very slowly within inches of bottom is the ticket to some fast paces action.   

Holly Schwarting / Kansas Agland

From Kansas Agland:

Many people assume nothing is going on with the alfalfa weevil during the winter months, or maybe that any eggs present will die during cold weather. That is not the case. Alfalfa weevils are cool-weather insects. Adults lay eggs in alfalfa fields in the fall or even the winter. Most of these eggs survive the winter, and continue to develop at temperatures above 48ºF.

Wikipedia / Creative Commons

Wind power is now cheaper than dirtier, conventional power.” The implication is that wind energy is now cheaper than coal and gas power nationwide. But that’s not exactly right, reports The Rural Blog. In most of the nation, traditional power sources are still cheaper, if only slightly.

Thomas Bougher / Texas Tribune

Texas has lost its bid to block the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan, reports The Texas Tribune. A federal appeals court has denied the Lone Star State’s request to put a stay on the environmental emissions legislation. The judge’s ruling leaves the controversial climate change rules in place as a legal challenge continues to make its way through the courts.

fpat / Creative Commons

It was a comparatively mild year weatherwise for Amarillo and the Texas Panhandle, reports Amarillo.com. Globally, 2015 was by far the hottest year in 136 years of recordkeeping. The worldwide temperature exceeded the 20th century average by 1.62 degrees. However, in Amarillo the temperature never rose above 100 degrees. That hasn’t happened since 2002.

Citizen Science: eBird

Jan 26, 2016
planetofbirds.com

eBird was launched in 2002 by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and National Audubon Society. It helps bird-watchers keep records of observations. It's another example of citizen science. eBird aggregates millions of bird sightings, which is very useful for scientists studying the movement, survival and behavior of birds.

Muhammed / Creative Commons

Over the past few years, bees and other pollinators have been disappearing from America, reports The Rural Blog.  Last year the Obama administration called for a national strategy to protect these insects. Bees are essential to many crops, and most states agreed to develop pollinator protection plans.

Luke Clayton

Hello Folks!

I had a great time at Caddo Lake with my long time friends Billy Carter and Phil Zimmerman. Billy and I have fished for good eating yellow bass for the past couple of decades. Billy was one of the first fishing guides that introduced the public to the yellow bass. They are hard fighters and, in my opinion, one of the best eating fish in freshwater.

Billy and his wife Dottie have several rental lake houses at Caddo. Billy also offers fisherman cabins at Johnson's Ranch Marina.

Jim Hill / KUNC

The governor of Colorado made a big announcement this week for hikers and nature lovers in the state. John Hickenlooper said the state will connect and build 16 hiking and biking trails in all parts of Colorado. The new plan will make it easier for people to access open space and parks, says member station KUNC.

arbyreed / Creative Commons

The federal government’s Clean Power Plan has caused a seismic shift in the way High Plains states approach their energy policy. The plan, unveiled last year,    gives states flexibility to achieve its mandates for reducing pollution. It sets ambitious but achievable goals. And it allows states to meet these goals in creative ways, instead of dictating the methods. The Clean Power Plan also provides credits for innovative ideas.

KFOR.com

A well-known resident of an Oklahoma nature reserve has been killed, reports KFOR. Visitors to the J.T. Nickel Preserve near Tahlequah were often greeted by an 8-year-old bull elk, known as “Hollywood.” But last week someone illegally poached Hollywood. His carcass was found, but his head was missing.

StateImpact Oklahoma

Last week more than 300 angry residents packed an Edmond, Oklahoma, ballroom to voice concerns over a dramatic rise in earthquakes. Now 14 Edmond residents have filed a lawsuit against a dozen oil and gas companies, reports StateImpact Oklahoma. The lawsuit claims the companies acted negligently. It asserts that companies’ use of disposal wells constitutes an “ultrahazardous activity” that “causes or contributes” to earthquakes.

Caninest / Flickr Creative Commons

Colorado officials are resisting a new wolf policy, reports ABC News. The federal government is expanding plans to restore endangered Mexican gray wolves to the Southwest. The attempt to import the predators has now spread to Colorado. About 110 Mexican gray wolves already roam portions of Arizona and New Mexico.

Aaron Marineau / Kansas Agland

Two cattle mutilation cases in McPherson and Harvey counties have law enforcement officials still searching for answers – even delving into cases from more than 40 years ago.

NATURE PHOTOGRAPHERS LTD./ALAMY

Clay Cooper signed the first Lesser Prairie-Chicken conservation plan in Texas, through the Natural Resources Conservation Service "Working Lands for Wildlife" partnership -- an agreement with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

USDA.gov

From Kansas Agland:

ELKHART – The Cimarron National Grassland implemented an emergency closure of part of its property in December after seven cattle were found dead.

Luke Clayton

More than 50,ooo people from across the globe streamed into the Dallas Convention Center last weekend to attend the granddaddy of all outdoor expos reports KERA News.  The Dallas Safari Club's Annual Convention is a place  you can find smokers, custom boots, leather cell phone cases, electric buggies, four-wheelers, insulated deer blinds, taxidermy services, hunting trips, guns, and High Plains Outdoors' Luke Clayton.  

Luke says you need a couple days and a good GPS to find your way around.  He found a few of his friends, and talked with them about their products.    

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

From Harvest Public Media:

Advocates for listing the monarch butterfly as threatened under the Endangered Species Act are tired of waiting for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to make up its mind.

LPCI: Grazing Management for Lesser Prairie-Chicken

Jan 12, 2016
McRoberts / USFWS

Healthy rangelands help the long-term sustainability of the landowner and the Lesser Prairie-Chicken. Practices that bolster the bird's habitat are also good for ranching, and can lead to improved rangeland health. NRCS provides technical and cost-assistance for grazing management programs under the Lesser Prairie Chicken Initiative.

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