HPPR Government and Politics

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blogoklahoma.us

Secretary of the Texas County Election Board, Glenda L. Williams, announced there are new polling locations for Texas County, Oklahoma.

Two Kansas candidates for a U.S. Senate seat recently met in their first public debate. Republican Senator Pat Roberts was on the offensive against Independent Greg Orman. Senator Roberts called Orman a “liberal.” Orman says he has supported Democrats and Republicans in the past. Libertarian Randall Batson is also running for the position.

When headlines surfaced last week that Russia would block U.S. agricultural imports, the news seemed dire, or at the very least, unpredictable.

The day it was announced, markets reacted, with Agrimoney.com calling a surge in wheat prices the “Putin premium.”

destination360.com

Kansas Chamber snubs seven Republicans in state House endorsements
The Kansas Chamber of Commerce announced candidates it's endorsing for Kansas House of Representatives in November, and some western Kansas Republicans are not included. Don Hineman of Dighton, J. Russell Jennings of Lakin, and John Doll of Garden City are among seven republicans not endorsed by the Chamber. All but one of the seven are running unopposed. In all of these races, the Kansas Chamber of Commerce opted not to endorse any candidate, according to reports by the Hutchinson News and Wichita Business Journal.

dodgeglobe.com

The board of Dodge City Community College has voted unanimously twice in four months to merge with Fort Hays State University to offer four-year programs.   Mirta Martin is the President of FHSU.  She recently attended a town hall meeting in Dodge City to dispel some concerns according to a recent article from the Hays Daily News.

khi.org

The Secretary of the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services says new federal labor rules may interfere with services that help disabled Kansans live in their own homes.  The concern is about overtime for workers who are hired and supervised by people with disabilities reported Bryan Thompson for Kansas Public Radio.

kaiserhealthnews.org

Kansas had 7% increase in Medicaid enrollment, also known as KanCare, between June of 2013 and 2014, despite the fact the state chose not to take advantage of federal funds to expand the program. The increase was also experienced by other states that did not expand Medicaid reported Bryan Lowry for The Wichita Eagle

Lima Pix/Flickr

An independent journalist says he’s found a way around the so-called “ag-gag” laws – flying drones over large livestock operations to document animal welfare problems and pollution.

Will Potter, a Washington D.C.-based environmental blogger, raised $75,000 on Kickstarter to buy drones and other equipment to do investigative work tracking animal abuse and pollution problems on large livestock operations.

edenprairieweblogs.org

  Before you send your kids off to school, take a moment to consider that Americans with bachelor’s degrees earn 59 percent more than those with only a high school diploma according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.  In that light, many parents are seeking the best school districts in an effort to secure the best chance for their children’s academic and eventually financial success.

Here are yesterday's primary results:

kscpa.org

July tax collections by the Kansas state government exceeded analysts’ projections for July.  This is a reversal of a three-month shortfall that deflated revenue more than $330 million according to the Topeka-Capital Journal.

When heading out to vote in the primary election today, KSN News has put together a guide to help you make the best choice.

timesdispatch.com

Dr. Mirta M. Martin is a living testament to the American dream.  Martin was born in Cuba.  As a young girl, she escaped the Castro regime, fleeing with her grandmother and sister to Spain, and then to the United States and Florida according to a recent article from the High Plains Journal.

k-state.edu

One thing that mixes into the Kansas water debate is where you live.  I have a neighbor from eastern Kansas who works hard to get things that grow wild in pastures of her childhood home to simply survive in her western Kansas flower bed. 

newportacademy.com

A new report from the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services says Kansans on Medicare will save more than $10 million this year on prescription drugs, thanks to one of the lesser-known provisions of the Affordable Care Act reported Bryan Thompson for Kansas Public Radio

alexmandossian.com

One of the lesser-known parts of the Affordable Care Act is about to put some money back into the pockets of nearly 60,000 Kansas families.  The refunds will total $3.6 million reported Bryan Thompson for Kansas Public Radio.

womenforkansas.org/

  Two ladies, one light, one dark, are traveling across Kansas this week talking about a grassroots movement called, “Women for Kansas.” 

wtamu.edu

The WT graduating class of 2012 entered the job market with better prospects and significantly less student loan debt.  The Amarillo Globe-News reported the average WT grad had student loan debt of $19,774 compared to the national average of $29,400.

cjonline.com

Former Senate President Steve Morris is one of 104 Kansas Republicans backing Paul Davis in his bid to be governor according to a recent article in the Garden City Telegram

Creative Commons

The “who” part of the Farm Bill is pretty clear.

With trillions dollars of government spending up for grabs, lobbyists from all ends of the spectrum – representing environmental interests, biotech companies, food companies, farmers – flocked to Capitol Hill to find their piece of the Farm Bill pie.

David Kosling/USDA

When U.S. Sen. Debbie Stabenow announced passage of the Farm Bill in February, she echoed a refrain from a car commercial.

“This is not your father’s Farm Bill,” she said.

While Stabenow, the Michigan Democrat who leads the Senate Agriculture Committee, was referring to what proponents heralded as “reform” of some programs, her remarks were accurate on another score. The massive Farm Bill, which will spend $956 billion and set U.S. food policy for the next decade, is no longer the purview solely of agricultural interests.

2014 National Climate Assessment

Texans voted overwhelmingly to fund new water infrastructure projects last November.  State water planners are preparing for a more populous Texas, but not a hotter one reported Neena Satija for The Texas Tribune.

kwo.org

The water plan for the state of Kansas was recently unveiled.  The goal is to ensure a reliable water supply for the future according to a recent article from the Washington Times.

DAVE FEHLING / StateImpact Texas

The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled on how much latitude the federal government has to regulate facilities that emit greenhouse gases.  Texas environmentalists who want more regulation and Texas state official who want less both say the ruling was a victory reported Dave Fehling for StateImpact Texas.

oklahomafarmreport.com

The U.S. Department of Defense and the Environmental Protection Agency will no longer provide no-cost surplus military vehicles and equipment to fire departments across the country reported StateImpact Oklahoma.

roberts.senate.gov

Republican U.S. Senator Pat Roberts recently signed a pledge sponsored by the conservative women’s organization, Independent Women’s Voice.  The pledge is to repeal, defund and dismantle the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare blogged Peter Hancock for the Lawrence Journal-World.

workingkansans.com

Kansas has a budget problem.  It’s collecting less tax money than it planned.  This spring, the state intended to take in $651 million from personal income tax, but only received $369 million. The decrease was due to a large and rather unusual income tax cut passed by lawmakers in 2012 according to The New York Times.

wikipedia.org

Kansas was one of 18 states that sided with Hobby Lobby in the court battle over opting out of the inclusion of contraceptives in their insurance coverage.  The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of Hobby Lobby saying certain employers can opt out of including contraceptives in their insurance because of religious beliefs.  The reaction in Kansas followed predictable ideological lines reported Bryan Thompson for Kansas Public Radio.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

Jean Schodorf says Kansans with voter registrations that are on hold should be allowed to cast ballots until there’s actual suspicion of voter fraud according to a story from KPR.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

The state of Kansas is loaning itself $675 million to be able to pay its bills.  That’s nothing new.  That’s how it’s been done for the last 16 years according to the Kansas Health Institute.

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