HPPR Health, Education & Welfare

Health

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Education

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Welfare

‐state policies‐income levels‐wellness‐quality of life

Motown31 / Creative Commons

Underperforming Texas schools could face harsh penalties, according to a new law that takes effect September 1st. The Texas Tribune reports that if school districts don’t perform up to standards, the state will be authorized to strip them of their authority, or even close the school.

Mark Sebastian / Wikimedia Commons

US students aren’t getting enough sleep, says a new study by the CDC. The reason? 82% of middle schools and high schools start too early for the students to get the necessary amount of nightly rest.

US Uninsured Rate Reaches Record Lows

Aug 11, 2015
jasleen_kaur / Flickr Creative Commons

The rate of uninsured citizens in the US continues to reach record lows, reports the Center for Rural Affairs. A recent Gallup report shows the rate falling 12 percent in the second quarter of 2015.Since the Affordable Care Act took effect, the rate of uninsured Americans has fallen by over 36%. Before the implementation of the ACA, the US uninsured rate was a persistent and growing problem. The problem was made worse by the Great Recession of 2008.

A Ranking of the Best and Worst States for Student Debt

Aug 10, 2015
thisisbossi / Flickr Creative Commons

The online financial site WalletHub has published a list of the best and worst states for student debt. The site compared the 50 states by combining seven key metrics , including average student debt, the state’s unemployment rate, and the percentage of students with past-due loan balances.

Alex Proimos / Flickr Creative Commons

From the Kansas Health Institute

Once again, the majority of the nation’s hospitals are being penalized by Medicare for having patients frequently return within a month of discharge — this time losing a combined $420 million, government records show.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

From the Kansas Health Institute

One of every five Kansas adults has at least one disability, according to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Rare mosquito-borne disease bites another Kansan

Aug 3, 2015

This is the eighth time this year a Kansas has contracted a disease that was never seen in the Western Hemisphere prior to 2013.

KUHF

The United States is producing so much oil these days that there aren’t enough pipelines to get it to refineries along the Gulf Coast. The solution: railroads. And many community activists are concerned that not enough is being done to prepare for crude fires and train derailments in residential communities, says StateImpact, a reporting project of NPR stations.

Bryan Thompson / KHI News Service

From the Kansas Health Institute:

A new partnership in southwest Kansas aims to build mental health services and help strengthen a couple of rural hospitals at the same time.

The nonprofit United Methodist Health Ministry Fund is leading an effort to make the health system work better for people in rural Kansas. The fund’s president, Kim Moore, said the current structure based on small, low-volume hospitals isn’t likely to survive long-term.

Scott Davidson / Flickr Creative Commons

The Texas radio news magazine Texas Standard has published a list of “10 Things about The Sandra Bland Traffic Stop That Every Texan Should Know."

Bland was arrested on July 10, and charged with assaulting a public servant. She was later found dead in her cell. Investigations were launched by the FBI and the Texas Rangers.

Creative Commons

Family farmer and agriculture advocate Katie Sawyer recently came across an article in Time magazine that questioned the safety of eating pork. While Sawyer admitted that the article’s author got it “half right,” she took to Kansas AgLand to set the record straight.

Flickr Creative Commons

For the past few years, the case against GMOs has grown and companies like Monsanto have entered the spotlight as activists call for labeling of genetically modified foods.

Kansas Near Bottom in Summer Food Program

Jul 21, 2015
Andy Marso / Kansas Health Institute

From the Kansas Health Institute:

Half of Kansas kids now qualify for free- and reduced-price lunches during the school year.

But only about 7 percent of those kids participate in summer food programs that keep them fed when school is out, according to a Wednesday presentation at the 2015 Kansas Conference on Poverty.

Bryan Thompson / Kansas Health Institute

From the Kansas Health Institute

A nonpartisan, nonprofit group of more than 500 retired generals and admirals see school nutrition as an important factor in military readiness.

Death and Dying: An Emerging Conversation

Jul 15, 2015
Bill Snead / KHI News Service

From the Kansas Health Institute:

Editor’s note: There is an emerging conversation about end-of-life issues and the policy changes needed to give people more control over what happens to them in their final days. This series of stories, and a video produced in partnership with Kansas City public television station KCPT, are about that conversation and the role that experts at two regional institutions are playing in it.

Alex Proimos / Flickr Creative Commons

From the Kansas Health Institute:

This week’s announcement that the federal government is proposing Medicare reimbursements for doctors who discuss end-of-life plans with their patients was one Christian Sinclair has been waiting for.

Creative Commons

Oklahoma may be one of the first states to repeal Common Core and draft completely new standards, Public Radio Tulsa reports.  Meanwhile, after repealing the Common Core goals, the state has instituted new academic standards in math and English, that in some ways go beyond Common core requirements. For example, elementary school students will be expected to write research papers, and high school students will need to know the “why”s behind mathematical formulas.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

Texas is hoping to attract more mental health care workers, and now the state is putting its money where its mouth is. In recent years, clinics in underserved and rural areas of the Lone Star State have had to get creative—touting clean air and low crime rates to bring in mental health professionals.

14% of Colorado Residents Use Marijuana, Study Finds

Jun 29, 2015
Chuck Grimmett / Creative Commons

NPR member station KRCC reports that a new study has found that 14% of Coloradoans use marijuana. The Colorado state Health Department reports that of those 14%, one third use pot every day. Almost one if five of state marijuana users drive after using the substance. A little over half of Colorado residents have never tried pot.

A study by Texas A&M University has found that rural living can be deadly. A lack of emergency services in outlying areas is costing lives, notes The Rural Blog. The study found that, during an emergency, those living more than 30 minutes from an emergency health-care facility have a 46 percent mortality rate, compared to only 21 percent for those living within 30 minutes of a hospital.

US Public School Funding Still Unfair, Report Suggests

Jun 23, 2015
Tom Woodward / Flickr Creative Commons

A new study finds that public school funding continues to be unfair across America, reports the watchdog website schoolfundingfairness.org. Despite the country’s economic recovery, states have been slow to restore public school funding to the levels they experienced before the recession. Students living in impoverished areas suffer the most.

Donnle Nunley / Flickr Creative Commons

The Rural Blog reports that minimum wage is severely inadequate to support a single-parent home in the United States. According to the National Low Income Housing Coalition, workers in Hawaii would need to earn $32, in California $27, and in New York $26 an hour to afford a decent two-bedroom apartment.

Kansas resident, Shona Banda, faces five counts, four of them marijuana related. Banda was booked into jail, and later released after posting $50,000 bond. If convicted on all counts, she could be looking at 30 years behind bars. Sarah Swain, of Lawrence, is her attorney. She says cannabis oil cured Banda of her Crohn’s Disease, and if she goes to prison and can’t get that treatment, she will likely die. According to Swain, Banda has been without the oil since her home was raided, and has lost a dramatic amount of weight, as a result. She’s also had to undergo oral surgery, due to infections that Swain says had been kept at bay by cannabis oil. Swain’s goal is to take Banda’s case all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, if necessary, to stop marijuana from being classified as a Schedule 1 drug, defined as having no medicinal value.

Robert Deutsch / USA TODAY

USA TODAY reports that, not only are more Americans becoming eligible for Medicare, they are increasingly sicker than their predecessors. Diagnoses of kidney disease, depression and high cholesterol have seen double-digit increases since 2008. In addition, over half of all Medicare beneficiaries have been diagnosed with high blood pressure. Two-thirds of today’s Medicare beneficiaries have multiple chronic conditions, and 15% have at least six long-term ailments.

Andy Marso

From the Kansas Health Institute:

For years Garden City resident Shona Banda has been self-medicating her Crohn’s disease with cannabis oil and making no secret of it, touting her homemade vaporizer on YouTube and in a self-published book.

Now Banda could face up to 17 years in prison for doing so, in a case that has medical marijuana advocates enraged and legislators from both parties saying it is past time to re-examine the state’s drug laws.

iStockphoto

Obtaining a prescription for medical marijuana in Colorado may soon prove more difficult, according to Colorado Public Radio. Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper has called for more oversight of physicians, as the vast majority of the state’s 100,000 marijuana prescriptions can be traced back to about two dozen doctors, and legislators want to ensure that these prescriptions are not being written frivolously. Dr.

http://401kcalculator.org

From Kaiser Health News:

Even in Kentucky, which championed the 2010 health care law by expanding Medicaid and running its own insurance marketplace, about half of poor people say they have heard little about the Affordable Care Act, according to a Harvard University study published Monday in Health Affairs.

New Report Ranks America's Safest States

Jun 9, 2015

The personal finance website Wallethub has released a report on America’s safest states in which to reside. Massachusetts tops the list, followed by Vermont and Minnesota.  Mississippi was named America’s least safe state. Among High Plains states, Nebraska is ranked at number 17 and Colorado at number 25, followed by Kansas at 30, Texas at 38, New Mexico at 48 and Oklahoma at number 49.

Reno County, Kansas Whooping Cough Outbreak Growing

Jun 9, 2015

The outbreak began in mid-May, with three cases of the highly-contagious respiratory disease. Now there are 23 reported cases, according to the Reno County Health Department, in Hutchinson. As of June 2nd, 134 cases of pertussis had been reported in Kansas this year. Pertussis causes rapid and violent coughing, and the struggle to inhale while coughing sometimes causes a “whooping” sound. Pertussis most commonly affects babies and young children, and can be fatal—especially during the first year of life. The bacteria responsible for the disease are spread through the air by coughing or sneezing. Symptoms appear one to three weeks after exposure. The best defense against pertussis is vaccination. Protection from the childhood vaccination tends to wane over time, but a booster shot is available. Getting the booster shot can protect you, as well as vulnerable babies you might come into contact with. Those who’ve been vaccinated may still catch pertussis, but the symptoms will likely be milder than if you have not been immunized. Health officials are asking anyone who’s been coughing for two weeks without explanation to see a doctor.

Egg imports from the Netherlands will be soon be allowed under a new decision from the U-S Agriculture Department. As Harvest Public Media’s Peggy Lowe reports, that’s because the huge outbreak of bird flu in the Midwest has hurt supplies.

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