HPPR Health, Education & Welfare

Health

‐state policy‐impact of federal policy‐rural health care delivery‐access & availability

Education

‐state policy‐programs and opportunities‐access & availability

Welfare

‐state policies‐income levels‐wellness‐quality of life

Patrick Michels / Texas Observer

Texans are being forced to wait longer to receive abortions than ever before, according to The Texas Observer. The number of abortion providers in Texas has fallen from 41 down to 18 since Republican lawmakers passed a restrictive law in 2013.

Kansas Ag Network

The president of the Kansas Farm Bureau is concerned about a growing problem: lack of education. According to the Dodge City Daily Globe, Rich Felts believes education is one of the biggest issues facing Kansas farmers. "There is so much about agriculture that isn't being passed on or explained to children," Felts said on Tuesday. The farm bureau president is concerned about the disconnect between the older and younger generations.

EPA Revises Pesticide Standards

Oct 8, 2015
Sakhorn / Shutterstock

The Environmental Protection Agency has released a new set of Worker Protection Standards, reports The Rural Blog. According to the new EPA rules, children under 18 will now be prohibited from handling pesticides in the US. Farm workers will also require pesticide training every year, a change to the old rule that required training every five years. And the new rules require posting of no-entry signs for areas containing the most hazardous pesticides.

Rural Colorado Struggles to Find Teachers

Oct 7, 2015
Jenny Brundin / CPR News

Colorado’s rural school districts are on the brink of crisis when it comes to finding enough teachers to fill the classrooms. Colorado is simply not producing enough teachers, reports Colorado Public Radio. Over the past five years, enrollments in the state's teacher prep schools are down 23 percent. Math, science and special education teachers are especially in demand. Colorado has begun to recruit educators in states with teacher surpluses, such as Michigan and Utah.

Amarillo Vaccine Program a Success

Oct 6, 2015
amarillo.com

Last year Amarillo created a program to protect residents from disease. And now that program is growing, reports Amarillo.com. The effort to immunize moderate- to low-income adults has given a few hundred more immunizations this year over last year. The city expects the number to increase by another few hundred vaccinations next year. Last week the Amarillo City Council voted to pay over half a million dollars for the vaccines it will take for the adult program.

Via Christi Health

From the Kansas Health Institute:

Kansas’ “failure” to expand Medicaid is putting health care providers in jeopardy, the head of the state’s largest health system said Wednesday.

Jeff Korsmo, CEO of Wichita-based Via Christi Health, issued a statement calling on Gov. Sam Brownback and Republican legislative leaders to drop their opposition to expanding KanCare, the state’s privatized Medicaid program.

Large Animal Vets: A Dying Breed

Oct 1, 2015
Smerikal / Flickr Creative Commons

The Rural Blog recently lamented the scarcity of large animal veterinarians in the heartland. The dearth of country vets in the US has recently come into the spotlight after a long piece in Harper’s, which called rural vets “a dying breed.”

Texas to Combine Women's Health Programs

Sep 30, 2015
Callie Richmond / Texas Tribune

Texas health officials are working to consolidate two of the state’s main women’s health programs, according to The Texas Tribune. The Texas Health and Human Services Commission announced Wednesday that it would combine the services to create the “Healthy Texas Women” program. Lawmakers say the consolidation will improve efficiency. The new initiative will begin on July first.

comedy_nose / Flickr Creative Commons

Oklahoma has been paying tens of thousands of dollars to administer a writing test for three straight years—with no results. According to KGOU's Oklahoma Watch, concerns have been raised about the writing test’s validity, and changing standards mean new tests must continually be created.

Panhandle Events Focus on Mental Health

Sep 28, 2015
Sean Steffen / Amarillo GLobe-News

Mental health took center stage last week in Amarillo, reports Amarillo.com. Two separate events attempted to bring awareness and improvement to psychological wellness in the Texas Panhandle. On Wednesday, health providers held a community mental health summit to discuss how to better serve panhandle veterans. Dr. Michael T. Lambert, chief of mental health services at the Amarillo VA Health Care System, was optimistic.

David Zalubowski / AP photo

Colorado tourists who want to smoke the pot they’ve legally purchased are running into a problem: where to light up. There’s no smoking in the stores—or on the street, or in parks, or in most hotels, reports Colorado Public Radio. Many tourists have turned to eating their marijuana; five million pot edibles were consumed in Colorado last year.

Christopher Hooks / Texas Observer

Texas’s latest budget has slashed funding for health care, and especially Medicaid. The cuts caused over 400 people, many of them parents of special needs children, to appear at a hearing in Austin last week. According to The Texas Observer, parent after parent took to the mic to complain that legislators were robbing their children of their futures.

Mercy Hospital Independence

From the Kansas Health Institute:

Rep. Jim Kelly says closure should serve as warning to other communities

The scheduled closure of the hospital in the southeast Kansas community of Independence could create new urgency around the Medicaid expansion debate.

Kansas Health Institute
Jacquelyn Martin / AP

Fall is here, and it’s time again for flu shots. Officials are making clear that they’ve tried to avoid a repeat of last year, when immunizations proved ineffectual against a surprise strain. 170 million doses of flu vaccine are expected this year, reports The Kansas City Star. Options range from traditional shots, a nasal spray, a high-dose version for seniors, and even a needle-free injection for squeamish patients.

Pixabay / Creative Commons

The federal health reform law known as the Affordable Care Act prevents insurers from considering pre-existing health conditions when setting premiums for consumers. But they are able to consider age, location and tobacco use.

And that means some Kansans who smoke are charged higher insurance rates, which may discourage low-income smokers from getting health coverage, according to a new issue brief from the Kansas Health Institute.

Concern Grows Over Uninsured Rates in Rural America

Sep 15, 2015
NEC Corporation of America / Creative Commons

The Institute of Medicine has grown increasingly concerned about the rate of uninsured rural Americans. Experts lament the growing threat uninsured Americans pose to the very fabric of America’s health care system.

Many Kansas Students Fall Short in Test Results

Sep 11, 2015
Mike Hutmacher / Wichita Eagle

Kansas residents had a look at state public school test assessment results this week, and the news isn’t good. As The Wichita Eagle reports, a majority of Kansas students are not ready for college-level work. The results were the first collected from new Common Core-aligned state tests administered last spring. In English, only 42 percent of Kansas students met grade level expectations for college readiness. In math, the level of prepared students fell to 34 percent.

Warren Vieth / Oklahoma Watch

Enrollment in Oklahoma’s state-supported health insurance program continues to dwindle, reports Public Radio Tulsa. The program, known as “Insure Oklahoma,” has been shrinking steadily for five years.

New ER to Open in Texas Panhandle

Sep 10, 2015
The Canyon News

The Texas Panhandle is getting a new emergency room, reports The Canyon News. But this ER isn’t in a hospital—it will be located on the block between I-40 and Amarillo Boulevard. Having an emergency room outside of a hospital is not new to Texas, but it’s new to the Panhandle. The facility is being opened by four seasoned ER doctors, who have 60 years of combined ER experience. The new emergency room, known as ER/NOW, opened for business at 7 a.m. last Friday.

Texas Enacts New Breastfeeding Law for State Employees

Sep 9, 2015
Christina Rutz / Creative Commons

Breastfeeding mothers who are employed by the State of Texas will now have an easier time of things. A new law took effect on September First that will provide legal protections to breastfeeding state employees, reports The Texas Observer.  

wikipedia.org

From the time we’re little, our parents teach us to watch out for muggers, pickpockets, and other lurkers. What is more difficult is protecting ourselves from invisible germs we pick up either in public or at home where we think we can let down our guard. Somehow, somewhere, an unseen virus targeted my immune system the first week of school. I apparently didn’t wash my hands nearly enough.

Creative Commons

The Oklahoman recently published an editorial calling for creative solutions to the Oklahoma teacher shortage. The state currently has about 1,000 teacher vacancies. That’s even after the state eliminated 600 teaching jobs during the last school year. The state has seen large rallies over the past couple of years. Protestors decried the fact that Oklahoma ranks near the bottom nationally in average salary for teachers.

http://www.wtamu.edu/

Middle-class Texans hoping to receive college tuition aid from the state are increasingly out of luck, according to The Texas Tribune. And starting September first, the situation will grow more dire.

Justin Dehn / Texas Tribune

a new Texas law may lead more schools to set up nurse's offices equipped to handle remote doctor visits. The program could save parents time and money. According to The Texas Tribune, the remote visits could begin at school nurses’ offices as soon as September 1st. Doctors will be able to communicate with children via a sophisticated form of video chat.

Food Security Supplement / Current Population Survey, 2013

According to a new study, rural children are less likely to take part in school lunch programs than their urban counterparts. As reported by The Daily Yonder, school-aged children in rural areas are 8 percent less likely to participate in the federal nutrition program, even though they qualify at the same rates as urban children.

Ohio Health Insuranc / flickr creative commons

A new study shows that rural Medicare patients are much less likely to receive follow-up care. They’re also more likely to end up in the emergency room, reports The Rural Blog. The study appeared in the September issue of the journal Medical Care. Researchers looked at the number of patients who had follow-up health care visits and emergency room visits within 30 days of hospitalization.

High Plains Residents Lack Access to Abortions

Aug 24, 2015
New York Times

When it comes to abortions, High Plains residents must travel farther than almost any other US citizens, reports the New York Times.  Amarillo residents must travel 234 miles to the nearest clinic. Many denizens of the Oklahoma Panhandle and Western Kansas must likewise travel over 200 miles to have the service performed. The national average outside Texas is 59 miles.

A letter from federal lab regulators cites K-State's "history of non-compliance" that has "raised serious concerns" about the school's ability to safely contain dangerous pathogens.

Motown31 / Creative Commons

Underperforming Texas schools could face harsh penalties, according to a new law that takes effect September 1st. The Texas Tribune reports that if school districts don’t perform up to standards, the state will be authorized to strip them of their authority, or even close the school.

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