HPPR History

amarillo.com/

Veterans in the Texas Panhandle got the OK to build a state-of-the-art museum and education center.  Randall County commissioners voted to allow construction of the Texas Panhandle War Museum and Education Center according to the Amarillo Globe News.

TRAVIS HEYING
THE WICHITA EAGLE

An upcoming book could give new insight into the 1959 murders of the Clutter family near Holcomb, Kansas.  A recent ruling allows the state detective’s son to publish his father’s personal notes. 

James Falows

Eighty years ago, Caroline Henderson wrote from her homestead in the Oklahoma panhandle for The Atlantic magazine.  Her popular regular installments, "Letters from the Dust Bowl", brought the reality of the daily grit and grind of the Dust Bowl to a national audience. 

kansas.com

There’s a new life for once-secret tunnels and rooms beneath Ellsworth, Kansas.

salon.com

A Kansas judge has decided the son of a deceased Kansas Bureau of Investigation agent can publish his father’s files from the 1959 killings that inspired the book, “In Cold Blood.”

National Park Service

The 150th anniversary of the Sand Creek Massacre passed recently and the use of the term “massacre” has carried great significance and stirred continued debate across the years.  It also played into the planning and naming of the current memorial on Colorado’s eastern plains as "The Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site."  That story is told in historian Ari Kelman’s 2013 book “A Misplaced Massacre: Struggling Over the Memory of Sand Creek” pub

Nick Hayes / Jonathan Cape

Many books have been written about Woody Guthrie and photographs of the Dust Bowl are recognized around the world. Now there is a graphic novel, Woody Guthrie and the Dust Bowl Ballads, that tells the story of Guthrie with imagined dialogue and stark, sepia colored illustrations.  

indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com

150 years ago this weekend the Third Colorado Cavalry converged on the southeastern Colorado camp of mainly Cheyenne and Arapahoe people.  The troop of 600 killed about 200 people-- mostly women, children and older men.

www.secoloradoheritage.com

A national historic site in southeastern Colorado will become a virtual reality in the video game Minecraft.  The Immersive Education Initiative announced Bent’s Old Fort will also be reconstructed as a fully immersive 3D environment.

Join us for Geography Awareness Week celebration on Silver Rails.  We have National Geographic Maps for your correctly answered questions.

gsswdenver.wordpress.com

Condemned by Congress, the Sand Creek Massacre marked the plains with blood, sparking warfare from Texas to the Canadian border. On the morning of November 29, 1864, U.S. Army Volunteers attacked a peaceful camp of Cheyenne and Arapaho, mutilated the dead, and looted the village. The massacre left behind about two hundred Cheyenne and Arapaho dead and many more wounded, with women and children comprising two-thirds of the casualties according to articles from the National Park Service.

bgfons.com

Time travel has been the focus of many a story over the years and recently was in the news with reports about American scientists investigating its possibility during WW II. Michael Crichton explored the concept in his novel Timeline, which required rearrangement of participants’ molecules. Both of these examples are too daring for me, but I’ve found a way to safely journey through time that’s safe for my students and me. All it requires is access to old newspapers, which are available at a local library.

freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com

The scenery along   Highways 9 and 36 challenges many people’s belief that Kansas is flat and treeless. Even in western Kansas, the road undulates over rolling hills. Trees line meandering waterways that lead into either the Solomon or the Republican River drainages. This undulating, grass covered country makes it easy to understand why native inhabitants fought so hard to continue hunting and living in its sheltered valleys.

historylines.net

Today is National Fossil Day.  It’s a time set aside by the National Park Service to remind us about the importance of fossils, and why they need to be preserved.

Lily Yuriko Nakai Havey

The Amache series has prompted a listener to send in these interesting Amache facts:

Pioneer Plant Finder

Aug 13, 2014
skreb.co.uk

Not all New World explorers discovered countries.  Some found new plants for the world to enjoy.  Today we'll look at a naturalist who helped record the floral finery of the gulf coast of Texas.  

Kirsten Leong

Carlene Tanigoshi Tinker was a little girl when she was an internee at Camp Amache, outside Granada, Colorado.  She resided there with her family from 1942 to 1944.  

She’s returning to Amache to volunteer at Denver University's field school.

She’s not standing by, watching the action, she’s in the midst of it, digging, brushing, and screening. 

The excavation reveals something.  The crew believes they have found a Japanese style bathtub called a furo.

Tinker explains a furo. 

knrc.ws

Everyone knew the open, treeless High Plains wasn’t a place to put down roots.  Making a home, farming, and development takes water, and in Western Kansas it’s arid and rainfall is in short supply.  Enter the grand idea of irrigation.

newschannel10.com

“The Last of the Big Dogs” has been dismantled, and now sits in the Freedom Museum in Pampa, Texas.  Disassembly workers at Pantex dubbed the B53 uranium bomb.  It’s a megaton-class, weighed about 10,000 pounds and is about the size of a minivan according to a recent article from the Amarillo Globe-News.

Unearthing Amache: The story begins

Jul 8, 2014
Angela Rueda

My name is Anika Cook.  I'm an anthropology student at the University of Denver (DU).  DU is conducting a field school at Camp Amache.  The project is focused on researching, interpreting, and preserving the tangible history of Amache, one of ten WWII-era Japanese American internment camps.

http://www.amache.org/photo-archives/

The Granada War Relocation Center, also known as Camp Amache, was a Japanese American internment camp located just south of US Highway 50 about a mile west of the small, farming community of Granada, Colorado.  It is an agricultural area with a semi-arid climate.  The Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad track lies just south of the camp.  

An exhibit of rare planes is in Texas. It includes the P-51, a C-47 and a B-25. Tours and low-altitude flights over Austin are going on all weekend. Click to link to see the planes and veterans taking part in the occasion.

texasarchive.org

Dr. Caroline Frick has a passion for saving Texas history through film.  She is a film archivist and a professor at the University of Texas at Austin.  Dr. Frick started the Texas Archive of Moving Image (TAMI) to accomplish her goal. 

D-Day at 70, Remembering Ike's Finest Hour

Jun 5, 2014
kpr.org

Seventy years ago, the allied invasion of Normandy, France marked the beginning of the end for Adolf Hitler and his Nazi empire. 

kansas.com

Today is the 60th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court decision ordering an end to segregation in public schools.  Governor Sam Brownback remembered Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka ruling by speaking at the former Monroe Elementary School in Topeka yesterday reported Kansas Public Radio

Amarillo Globe-News

Marvell Ervin White is remembered in Amarillo as a community organizer and community activist.

Among her most notable accomplishments include organizing for a community center in Amarillo's North Heights district. White was honored as co-founder of the Amarillo United Citizens Forum, which saw the Cultural Center built in the early 1990's.

The Wichita Eagle

Contrary to the impression you might get from some of the old Hollywood Westerns you may have seen, cowboys of the Old West were not all white men.

Amarillo Globe-News

One year after Amarillo was first settled in 1887, Jerry Calloway moved to Amarillo.

Recognized as Amarillo's first black resident, Jerry Calloway moved to the city with a white family from Georgia, living as a domestic in the home of his employer J.C. Calloway.

amarillo.com

Matthew “Bones” Hooks was a trailblazer in Amarillo.  The son of slaves, Hooks is best known as a cowboy, an Amarillo civic leader, and the first black person to serve on a Potter County grand jury according to a recent article in the Amarillo Globe-News.

Hooks was also a leader in the religious community and a businessman, living in Mobeetie and Clarendon.  He worked to establish the North Heights subdivision in Amarillo.  Bones Hooks Park at North Hughes and Northwest 20th Avenue in Amarillo was named after him.

topeka365.com

The Path to Statehood

Kansas became the 34th state on January 29, 1861.  The journey to become a state was long and bloody.  The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 opened the two territories to settlement and allowed the new settlers to determine whether the states would be admitted to the union as “free” or “slave.”  

Pages