HPPR People

amarillo.com/

Half a century ago, Tony and Claudia Price were two 18 year old kids on their honeymoon in Oklahoma City.  The Texas pair returned home with priceless story that went viral—the old fashioned way according to the Amarillo Globe News

Gloria Tucker / Dodge City Daily Globe

Mary Springs knows the secret to living a long life. She says it's blueberries and beer reported the Dodge City Daily Globe.

friendsoffogelberg.com

 Buddy Squyres is Mike's guest this morning on High Plains Morning.  They're talking about the upcoming Friends of Fogelberg concert.

This year's show is a tribute to the Beatles and prostate cancer survivors.

Squyres is a survivor.  He encourages all men over the age of 50 to be screened.  

All proceeds from the concert stay in the Panhandle to fund the fight against prostate cancer.

A free screening is planned for this Saturday, at the Westgate Mall from 10 am to 2 pm.

akronnewsreporter.com

Rodney Meade was inducted into the Colorado County Music Hall of Fame this weekend in Boulder according to the Akron News-Reporter.

Courtesy Emily Robbins

Emily Robbins is a city girl now.

Well, I’m using that term as a cliché. Robbins, 27, lives in Kansas City and works as an engineer at a large firm. She is part of a profession that is made up of just 14 percent women.

Her choice of professions makes sense, though, when you know that she started out as her father’s “boy.”

The Texas Panhandle bids farewell to a quiet man, Henry Carroll LaMaster. A quiet man, who came from a pioneering family of humble service and education that did two things no other family in the Panhandle accomplished.

Jacob McCleland for Harvest Public Media

As a young man, Elisha Pullen never imagined he would spend his days on the farm.

Growing up near rural Bell City in southeastern Missouri’s “Bootheel” region, Pullen longed to leave the farm and get an education.

“I grew up in the day and time when we had to do a lot of chopping and stuff like that. Hard labor,” Pullen said. “I’m going to college, I’m getting my degree and I’m going to work in the air conditioning.”

Brett Ryder / economist.com

Koch Industries is one of the great success stories of American business.  The oil, gas and commodities conglomerate is based in Wichita.  It employs more than 100,000 people worldwide and has an annual turnover of about $115 billion.  It’s also one of the most unusual companies in its management techniques, enthusiasm for political activism, as well as the intensity of its family feuds according to a recent article in the Economist about a new book, “Sons of Wichita,” by Daniel Schulman.

bostonherald.com

Angelo McClain is a social worker.  He never planned on it, but that’s where the road led. 

dodgeglobe.com

Vanessa Melendez was six years old when she arrived in the United States.  She doesn’t remember much about her life before in Mexico.  The Dodge City resident does remember being a teenager and discovering she was in the U.S. illegally when she applied for her first job according to a recent article from the Dodge City Daily Globe.

wtamu.edu

James Welch didn’t plan his career.  He just worked hard and did the next thing according to an article from West Texas A&M University.

amarillo.com

Emily Pulley has traveled the world doing what she loves—singing. 

Pulley’s journey began at West Texas State University.  Although she loved to sing, her dad wasn’t sure she could make a living at it, so she planned to earn a master’s degree in English and teach according to an article from WT. 

americansongwriter.com

Who has more number one songs than Guy Clark, Willie Nelson and Don Henley combined? 

It’s Gruver, Texas farm boy Rodney Clawson. 

Luke Clayton

Howdy folks!

This week I have the pleasure of talking with Terry Tate.  If you recall, he's a designer and builder of big bore air rifles.  He's been giving me lessons before we go out hunting with the air rifles for wild hogs.

I can't wait!

Veteran’s Day 2013 Profile: Doug Laubach

Nov 8, 2013
Doug Laubach

Doug Laubach enlisted in the Army with his draft card in his pocket on Feb. 15, 1970.  He was sent to Fort Ord, California for basic training, and during that time, he was asked if he would be interested in attending a lecture., with who and what it was about was not told.  He went.  That choice took him to the White House during the Nixon years. 

Veteran’s Day 2013 Profile: Martin Huschka

Nov 7, 2013
Martin Huschka

Martin Huschka makes surviving the Battle of the Bulge sound like another day at the office in his matter of fact tone.  But, the fight that began December 16, 1944, was an all-out gamble by Hitler to push the Allies to ask for peace according to History.com

Veteran’s Day 2013 Profile: Tommy Webb

Nov 6, 2013
Tommy Webb

Circumstances do not predict the future.  Tommy Webb is living proof.  

Veteran’s Day 2013 Profile: Larry Large

Nov 5, 2013
Larry Large

For Larry Large, serving in the military is a family tradition.  It is not a duty or responsibility.  It is a privilege.  His grandfather, father, brother, and son all served. 

Amarillo’s Danny Wall Inducted into Hall of Fame

Sep 27, 2013
Russell Anglin / amarillo.com

Danny Wall was recently inducted into the Texas Bicycle Motocross Hall of Fame.  Wall, a 49-year old remodeling contractor, is one of the state’s pioneering BMX racers in the late 1970s and 80s according to the Amarillo Globe-News.

Dr. Dixie Milello: A Texas Overcomer

Sep 23, 2013
papercitymag.blacktie-houston.com

Dr. Dixie Milello follows the road less taken.  She also has what it takes to turns challenges into strength.

Mike Fuller: A Glimpse Inside

Aug 27, 2013
alamomusic.com

There are a few families that show me how love looks and acts.  The Fullers do.  What some might see as a burden, they see as a blessing.  Read Mike’s feature from the Inspire section of Amarillo Magazine to get a glimpse into how this grandfather sees his grandson. 

With Mike’s approval, here’s the song he wrote for Max, “Son of a Daughter.”


hayspost.com

Lloyd Trauer spent a long time working in education.  Trauer recently announced that he is leaving his entire estate, worth more than half a million dollars, to provide scholarships reported The Topeka Capital-Journal.  According to his wishes, preference will be given to students from west of Salina, but the scholarships will be open to anyone in elementary education.

Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

One sign that you have strong farm roots is when your rural road is named for your family.

I met Steve Quandt on Quandt Road, north of Grand Island, Neb., on the farm that used to belong to his grandfather. It’s the place he remembers spending days as a kid, from morning to night, helping milk cows, work the fields and repair machinery.

He followed in his father’s and grandfather’s footsteps, building his own farming operation. But that path was suddenly interrupted nearly six years ago.

Kenneth Wyatt is a Texas Panhandle treasure.  The 83 year old is one of the country’s, maybe the world’s, premier artists of western and religious paintings according to the Amarillo Globe-News

Frank Morris/Harvest Public Media

I met Nate Pike working on a story back in 2012. When I dropped back by his ranch 30 miles south of Dodge City, KS, this summer, he took me on a bumpy pickup ride to see a spring called St. Jacob’s Well and we got to talking about the former owner of some of his ranchland.

Pike has been out on his ranch for a while and he told me the former owner started ranching in western Kansas before 1900.

“He was a fine old gentleman and one of the toughest old men I ever knew,” Pike told me, his gravelly voice carrying over the pickup truck’s rambles.

Hardwired for hard work

Jul 15, 2013
Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Amy Konishi says when her obituary is written it’ll read, “All she knew was work.”

It’ll be a fitting tribute given the 87-year-old’s work ethic. As a young girl she toiled in her family’s onion and cantaloupe and dry bean fields outside Rocky Ford, Colo. Then she moved to selling produce at her husband’s roadside shed along the highway. In the 1950s she opened her own hair salon and she’s been putting in hours ever since.  

Canadian Says Goodbye to The Comet

Jul 12, 2013
rollingdownhwy83.blogspot.com

Bill Cross, a 5' 6" stick of dynamite, was one of the all-time-greatest football players to come out of the Texas Panhandle said a piece in High Plains Yesterdays.

Sean Steffen / AGN Media

The Freedom Train toured the country from 1947-1949, and again from 1975-1976.  It was  the idea of Attorney General Tom C. Clark to remind Americans of the freedoms, liberties, and sacrifices so often taken for granted.   The Amarillo Globe reported The Freedom Train is back... in miniature... in Canyon, Texas.  

I recently had the opportunity to sit down and talk with Skip Mancini and Jan Evans about a project to raise Alzheimer's awareness in southwest Kansas. 

Skip Mancini is the creator and voice of Growing on the High Plains.  She also has been profoundly affected by Alzheimer's.  Both her parents had the disease. 

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Trent Johnson didn’t grow up on a farm, but he was always enamored with the cowboy lifestyle.

He sure looks the part now. I visited him in his custom cowboy hat shop in Greeley, Colo. In a sleek black cowboy hat and blue western shirt, Johnson delivers the modern cowboy aesthetic.

During college he hung out with the urban cowboy crowd, which included concerts for country idols like Garth Brooks and Tim McGraw. The city kid, who’d spent part of his childhood on a ski team, decided he needed a change.

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