internet access

David Paul Morris / Bloomberg News

Facebook wants to expand free Internet service in the United States, according to the Silicon Valley Business Journal.

The social media giant is working with rural Internet providers on a program called Free Basics. The initiative would give Americans access to a limited number of websites for free.

Rural Blog

When rural areas adopt broadband networks, it leads to higher levels of voting and civic engagement.

That’s according to a new a new study by Oklahoma State University. The study found that, as rates of rural broadband adoption increase, so do other civic factors. These include rates of voting in local elections, contacting local public officials, joining a neighborhood group and discussing politics with friends or family.

E-commerce is transforming rural America in a lot of ways. In small towns, big-city conveniences are now only a click away. But, as The Wall Street Journal reports, the change comes with a price.

Nebraska Senator Deb Fischer gathered a prestigious roundtable of telecommunication and agriculture leaders at the Nebraska State Fair this week, reports. The commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission even paid a visit.

Jeremy Lange / New York Times

A federal court’s decision concerning a broadband internet case could have wide-ranging implications for rural Americans.

This month, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit upheld restrictive laws in North Carolina and Tennessee. These laws will halt the growth of municipal broadband networks in those states.

Morning Consult

Rural residents still aren’t using the internet as much as their urban counterparts, according to a new study.

In today’s advanced world it’s important to ensure your business’s records and information are adequately secure. To that end, the Center for Rural Affairs has published a list of Cybersecurity Tips from the Small Business Administration.

Rural Schools Pay Significantly More for Internet

Dec 14, 2015
Lars P / Flickr Creative Commons

In recent years Internet access in public schools has become an integral part of the education experience. But a new report by Education Week shows how rural school districts are frequently charged 2.5 times their urban counterparts for Internet. According to the Center for Rural Affairs, rural schools disproportionately lack access to fiber-optic connections and other modern technologies.

Will Libraries of the Future Be Book-Free?

Dec 8, 2015
Bill Kelly / NET News

A new type of library in Omaha has Nebraska Public Radio asking, will libraries of the future contain no books? Do Space, a self-described “community technology library,” comes equipped with high-end computers loaded with professional software, gaming and electronic gizmos for kids.

FCC Data Compiled by The Daily Yonder

High Plains residents with scanty internet have reason to rejoice this week. The Rural Blog recently reported on details of the Connect America Fund plan to bring high-speed Internet to more rural areas.

Vassilis Michalopoulos / Flickr Creative Commons

US rural residents received some good news this week. The Rural Blog reports that the network communications company Windstream has received $175 million to support internet use in the countryside. The money will go to support broadband for customers in 17 states, among them Texas, Oklahoma, and Nebraska. The broadband support will allow rural customers to access fast internet speeds in areas where service might otherwise be prohibitive.

Out on the farm, they're still using dial-up

Jan 8, 2015

There is disparity when comparing broadband access in urban and rural America.  The gap gets even bigger when it comes to access on the farm reports Choices Magazine.

Data suggests 100 percent of urban residents have access to at least one broadband provider… compared to 78 percent of rural residents.

Take it a step further.  On the farm 70 percent of farms in 2012 had internet access, but it’s the level of service that varies.  Seven percent of farmers use dial-up, 13 percent satellite, and 13 percent mobile broadband.

United States Senator Ted Cruz opposes taxes for both internet access and internet purchases. It's not a position that's popular with schools. libraries or Main Street merchants, as reported in this article from the The Texas Tribune.

The “digital divide” between urban and rural areas used to be all about access to broadband internet service.  Today it is much more about adoption where access is now available.