Japanese American internment camp

The second to last Saturday in May people who were held at Camp Amache journey to the detention center in southeastern Colorado. The come to share what they remember about their time behind the barbed wire. Previously, busloads of former detainees have attended. This year there were only two who could make the trek- Bob Fuchagami, age 85, and Jane Okubo who was born at the camp. Fuchagami was 12 years old when his family of 10, were taken from their walnut and peach tree farm outside Yuba City, California to take up residence in two rooms in 7G. He says it wasn’t freedom to be swept up and have two suitcases of stuff, go to an area you’ve never known before with sandstorms coming through the cracks. There’s almost nothing left of the camp. A handful of buildings, shattered porcelain, exposed rebar, concrete slabs, an occasional ribbon of barbed wire, and very few survivors. Survivors say as they age and their peers die, their experiences are falling deeper and deeper into the footnotes of history.

Kirsten Leong

Carlene Tanigoshi Tinker was a little girl when she was an internee at Camp Amache, outside Granada, Colorado.  She resided there with her family from 1942 to 1944.  

She’s returning to Amache to volunteer at Denver University's field school.

She’s not standing by, watching the action, she’s in the midst of it, digging, brushing, and screening. 

The excavation reveals something.  The crew believes they have found a Japanese style bathtub called a furo.

Tinker explains a furo. 

http://www.amache.org/photo-archives/

The Granada War Relocation Center, also known as Camp Amache, was a Japanese American internment camp located just south of US Highway 50 about a mile west of the small, farming community of Granada, Colorado.  It is an agricultural area with a semi-arid climate.  The Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad track lies just south of the camp.