Kansas state budget

nathansnews.com

Revenue estimates for the state of Kansas are in, and the projections have a lot of red ink reported Stephen Koranda for Kansas Public Radio.  To balance the books for the current fiscal year, which is half over at the end of December, $279 million needs to be cut.  $435 million in reductions needs to be made to balance the upcoming fiscal year. 

kscpa.org

July tax collections by the Kansas state government exceeded analysts’ projections for July.  This is a reversal of a three-month shortfall that deflated revenue more than $330 million according to the Topeka-Capital Journal.

workingkansans.com

Kansas has a budget problem.  It’s collecting less tax money than it planned.  This spring, the state intended to take in $651 million from personal income tax, but only received $369 million. The decrease was due to a large and rather unusual income tax cut passed by lawmakers in 2012 according to The New York Times.

Stephen Koranda / KPR

The state of Kansas is loaning itself $675 million to be able to pay its bills.  That’s nothing new.  That’s how it’s been done for the last 16 years according to the Kansas Health Institute.

khi.org

Duane Goossen is a former state budget director, and he says the state won’t have enough revenue to implement the budget legislators recently passed according to a recent article from the Topeka Capital-Journal.

fhsu.edu

Last year the Kansas Legislature took money from universities, but Gov. Sam Brownback’s proposed budget restores the ‘salary cap’ reductions that cost Fort Hays State University $276,176 according to a press release from FHSU University Relations.

Phil Cauthon / Kansas Health Institute

Legislators set for second half of two-year cycle for the first time in decades

For the first time since 1954, when Kansas legislators return to Topeka in January, they’ll be dealing with the state budget in a different way according to the Kansas Health Institute.  

Charlie Riedel/Associated Press

Negotiations may be on the horizon for higher education spending, but the Wichita Eagle reports agreement seems a long way off.

tilrc.org

In the midst of conference committee negotiations, with dozens of bargaining items on the table, Representative and House Appropriations Committee Chair, Marc Rhoades, presented a $12 million grant program earmarked for Educational Design Solutions.  Dave Ranney reported in a  recent article by the Kansas Institute of Health the Senate agreed to this addition partially out of desire to end the drawn out session to a close. 

Leaders in higher education struggle operate within caps and budget cuts, families wrestle with increased tuition, legislators grapple with fiscal accountability, and Governor Brownback signs the cuts into budget.

Dion Lefler/The Wichita Eagle

State legislatures are constitutionally mandated to provide adequate funding for schools.  Courts in both Kansas and Texas recently ruled this directive is not being met. 

Kansas faces a $234 million budget deficit. How would you resolve the problem? Cut taxes or raise them? Increase spending or downsize government? The Kansas Health Institute has created the Budget Puzzle as a tool that allows you to fashion your own version of the next state budget. Give it a try.