High Plains Public Radio

liquor sales

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A new law in Oklahoma will allow grocery and convenience stores to sell wine and strong beer starting in October of 2018.

Up to now, only liquor stores were allowed to sell these products. But the fight over the new law isn’t over yet.

As the Fort Smith Times Record reports, Oklahoma’s liquor stores are challenging the new voter-approved guidelines, hoping to put a stop to them. They say the law will put mom-and-pop liquor stores out of business.

Quinn Dombrowski / Flickr Creative Commons

A retail liquor group in Oklahoma has filed a lawsuit aimed at blocking a ballot initiative passed by over 65 percent of voters that would allow wine and cold beer to be sold at grocery and convenience stores.

Quinn Dombrowski / Flickr Creative Commons

A new Oklahoma liquor law is set to take effect in a little over a week. And, as KOKI reports, Oklahoma craft beer brewers are making final preparations for the shift.

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The dream of many Oklahomans to one day be able to buy beer and wine in grocery stores came one step closer to fruition this week, reports KFOR.

zastayki / Creative Commons

A group of Oklahomans is launching a petition drive to place an alcohol measure on the November election ballot, reports Public Radio Tulsa. The group is calling for the sale of strong beer and wine at Oklahoma’s grocery stores, gas stations and convenience stores.

Michael Glasgow/Texas Tribune

In Panhandle, a Growing Need for a Shallow Lake's Water
Lake Meredith, previously empty, is only 4% full, but those 2.8 billion gallons are enough for the Canadian River Municipal Water Authority to start pumping water from the lake. The authority supplies water to Amarillo, Lubbock, and surrounding areas. The low water means higher sediment levels, which will affect the water's taste and cause higher treatment costs. More from the Amarillo Globe-News.

Canadian, Texas: Residents Vote to Stay Dry

Nov 8, 2013
politicspa.com

Canadian will remain dry.  The majority voters in Tuesday’s election cast ballots opposing the legalization of local liquor sales according to The Amarillo Globe-News.