Medicaid expansion

cfah.org

Potter and Randall Counties in the Texas Panhandle have been making incremental improvements when it comes to overall child well-being. Even so, as Amarillo.com reports, both counties continue to rank at or below average when compared with the nation at large. A new report measured child well-being in four areas: economic well-being, education, health, and family and community. Texas as a whole is ranked 43rd in the nation.

There's a new study out. It shows that health providers in states that expanded Medicaid are doing much better than providers in states that didn't expand the program.

KUT

Health care providers received some welcome news this week. According to KUT and The Texas Tribune, the Obama administration has agreed to temporarily keep federal Medicaid money flowing into the Lone Star State. The money will go toward helping hospitals treat uninsured patients.

State of Arkansas

From the Kansas Health Institute:

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on Thursday signed an appropriation bill into law and used a line-item veto to ensure continuation of the state’s Medicaid expansion, ending a two-week budget standoff.

The Medicaid expansion covers more than 267,000 Arkansans who make less than 138 percent of the federal poverty level (annually about $16,000 for an individual or a little more than $33,000 for a family of four).

Center for Rural Affairs

Over the past six years rural hospitals have been closing at a rate of nearly one per month, according to the Center for Rural Affairs. A hospital closure can be very hard on a rural hospital. But it doesn’t have to be this way, says the CFRA.

The closings have been especially widespread in the 18 states that have refused to expand Medicaid. Those states include Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas.

Jim McClean / Kansas Health Institute

From the Kansas Health Institute:

Health care problems just one result of the economic decline of rural communities.

Members of Gov. Sam Brownback’s Rural Health Working Group have their work cut out for them.

Representatives of the state’s hospitals and doctors painted a sobering picture of the problems facing rural providers at the group’s first meeting Tuesday evening.

Susie Fagan / KHI news service

From the Kansas Health Institute:

Proponents of expanding Medicaid eligibility in Kansas need to change tactics and prepare for a long process, a health policy researcher told them Wednesday.

The New York Times

  The New York Times recently mapped America’s uninsured. And when you view the map as a whole, clear regional patterns are emerging about who has health insurance in America and who still doesn’t. The remaining uninsured are primarily in the South and the Southwest. They tend to be poor people who live in Republican-leaning states. Texas and Oklahoma are particularly dark on the map, showing large rates of uninsured.

KHI news service

From the Kansas Health Institute

A new computer system for enrolling Kansans in Medicaid and other public assistance programs will generate far less than the expected $300 million in savings, a Legislative Post Audit report found.

Susie Fagan

From the Kansas Health Institute:

Three Republicans will not be returning to the House Health and Human Services Committee next year.

The reason: Their support for Medicaid expansion.

As the Kansas legislative session winds down, a late-session attempt to make Medicaid expansion a bargaining chip was sidelined by debates on a tax and budget plan. Expansion would have made all Kansas adults with incomes up to 138 percent of poverty eligible.

Dave Ranney / Kansas Health Institute

At the beginning of the 2015 legislative session, Kansas hospital administrators signaled their willingness to talk about increasing a state assessment on their revenues to fund Medicaid expansion.

They anticipated that the state’s deteriorating budget situation would make it impossible for Gov. Sam Brownback and Republican legislative leaders to consider expansion without a way to pay for the state’s share of the costs.

And they anticipated that even with funding options, Medicaid expansion was a long shot to pass.

Dave Ranney / Kansas Health Institute

State officials told legislators Thursday that the state's share of Medicaid expansion costs could start at $100 million per year and increase from there, and those costs could double if the federal government required full funding of waiting lists as a condition of expansion.

One day after her predecessor testified in favor of expansion under the Affordable Care Act, Kansas Department of Health and Environment Secretary Susan Mosier provided neutral testimony that warned legislators of potential fiscal pitfalls.

Mosier said there were "moral implications" of expanding Medicaid to "able-bodied adults" while Kansans with disabilities were still awaiting some services, likening it to "cutting in line."

Robert Moser headlines list of 150 Medicaid expansion proponents from business, medical and religious realms. The former cabinet secretary says providers need it, and the people of Kansas need it.

KHI News Service

News that Gov. Sam Brownback has softened his position on Medicaid expansion wasn’t exactly racing through the Statehouse on Thursday.

But it certainly had some legislators buzzing.

In remarks Wednesday to conservative lawmakers in Missouri, Brownback said if the Kansas Legislature presented him with a budget-neutral expansion bill, he would likely sign it, according to a report in the Missouri Times.

thepoliticalinsider.com

Kansas Rep. Tom Sloan is trying to piece together a Medicaid expansion proposal he hopes Gov. Sam Brownback and GOP conservatives might consider according to the Kansas Health Institute

The moderate Republican from Lawrence is borrowing elements from other conservative governors that have received or are seeking federal approval for more private-sector approaches.

The state’s budget shortfalls won’t make things any easier.  The bill has to find a way to cover the state’s share of expansions costs for several years. 

kaiserhealthnews.org

Kansas had 7% increase in Medicaid enrollment, also known as KanCare, between June of 2013 and 2014, despite the fact the state chose not to take advantage of federal funds to expand the program. The increase was also experienced by other states that did not expand Medicaid reported Bryan Lowry for The Wichita Eagle

obamacareworks.org

A recent panel said the decision by Gov. Sam Brownback and Republican legislative leaders not to expand Medicaid is denying care to thousands and costing Kansas hospitals millions of dollars according to a recent article by the Kansas Health Institute.

sostadiumstatus.blogspot.com

Colorado has expanded the Medicaid program, as part of the state’s implementation of the Affordable Care Act.  That means tens of thousands of new Medicaid patients will have access to healthcare.  Proponents of the Affordable Care Act say that getting more people insured will cut down on emergency room visits, but a recent study shows that is not what happened in Oregon according to a recent conversation on Colorado Matters from Colorado Public Radio.

Millions Left Without Despite Affordable Care Act

Oct 3, 2013
nytimes.com

A sweeping national effort to extend health coverage to millions of Americans will leave out two-thirds of the poor blacks and single mothers and more than half of the low-wage workers who do not have insurance, the very kinds of people that the program was intended to help, according to an analysis of census data by The New York Times.