Palo Duro Canyon


***But if you would like to volunteer, donate, or help out with this event in any way, contact Jenny ASAP at We're going to have a blast!


On Saturday, August 13th, High Plains Public Radio & the Amarillo Art Institute invite kids of the High Plains to CHASE THE SUNSET with a celebration of art, music, and nature to bid the summer a final farewell.

Last Buffalo Hunt

Mar 17, 2016

Hello, Radio Readers! We’re reading and discussing a High Plains sense of place with Sam Gwynne’s Empire of the Summer Moon, a social history, as Gwynne writes, of “the rise and fall of the Comanche. “ After thirty-some years, the Comanche capitulated to the US, surrendering horses and weapons in exchange for life on a reservation. There, Gwynne writes, “everything that defined Comanche existence” was exchanged for “crude squalor….hunger and desperation and dependency” – benefits promised to the Comanche turned out to be insufficient, paltry, and shoddy. Gwynne suggests that those who adopted and adapted to white ways did so to survive, even as they tried to preserve their culture, however vestigially.

Sad Monkey Railroad Finds a New Home in Canyon

Dec 7, 2015
The Canyon News

An important part of many happy Palo Duro Canyon childhood memories has found a new home, reports The Canyon News. The Sad Monkey Railroad was a small train that made a short circuit through the canyon to the delight of thousands of children over many years. And now the train will be displayed near the town square in Canyon, Texas.

There is an upside to lower oil prices. StateImpact Texas takes a look at consumer trends. Lower prices at the pump might mean more tourists for gems like Palo Duro Canyon.

Palo Duro Canyon is No. 1 on Fodor’s America’s 10 Best State Parks reported the Amarillo Globe-News.

“Texas”… The Show Goes On

Aug 14, 2013

As evening gives way to night, a lone horseman appears on the cliff above Pioneer Amphitheatre in Palo Duro Canyon.  He carries the Texas state flag.  Fireworks sparkle, the music grows, and a cast of 60 burst on the stage telling the struggles and triumphs of Panhandle settlers in the 1800s.  It’s the outdoor musical “Texas”-  a summer tradition in the nation’s second largest canyon for 48 years.