Right to Farm

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma’s State Question 777, better known as the “Right to Farm” initiative, has drawn a good deal of controversy in recent months, reports StateImpact Oklahoma. SQ 777 would amend Oklahoma’s constitution to prevent the state Legislature from enacting laws that limit agricultural technology, livestock production or ranching practices, unless the state has a compelling interest to do so.

Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

In November Oklahoma voters will decide on State Question 777. Supporters are calling the ballot initiative a “right-to-farm” bill, but opponents prefer the term “right-to-harm.”

As StateImpact Oklahoma reports, right-to-farm is a divisive national issue that’s made its way to Oklahoma. The question has pitted pro-agriculture activists against environmentalists and animal-rights activists in a statewide battle for votes.

A bill that barely passed last fall in Missouri is one step closer to November 2016 ballots. The bill is to amend Oklahoma's state Constitution.

Some farmers are feeling a bit defensive – or put-upon -- these days. Take the recent experiences of Bob Young, for instance.  The 69 year old raises 36-hundred hogs on the land where he grew up near Rochester in central Illinois.  When he was getting ready to build a hog confinement facility seven years ago some area residents, concerned about the potential smell of the place, filed suit.  A court order stopped construction for 18 months.