rural economy

Gobierno de Chile / Wikimedia Commons

Evidence is mounting that President Donald Trump’s decision to back out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership is taking a heavy economic toll on rural America, reports POLITICO.

U.S. farmers and meat producers had been looking forward to seeing Asian markets opened up to their products. Instead, countries like Japan have taken their business elsewhere, seeking to purchase meats, grains and fruits from countries with lower tariffs.

San Antonio Express News

In a recent editorial in the San Antonio Express-News, two prominent Texas economists suggested ways to revitalize the rural economy in Texas.

Many people in Texas yearn for small-town life, write Thomas Tunstall and Gil Gonzalez, but their rural work options are limited. An investment in rural infrastructure, including broadband, would help this problem.

Brian McGuirk / Flickr Creative Commons

Kansas Agland is taking a look at the agriculture economy from the perspective of farmers and farm implement dealers, who are finding ways to adapt.

An overabundant supply in wheat, corn and every other crop has pushed the prices of those commodities below what many farmers need to break even.

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Things are looking up in the heartland.

A new USDA study reports that some of the employment and population declines that have plagued rural America in past year have recently turned a corner.

Brendan Smialowski/Agence France-Presse / Getty Images

HPPR recently reported on a story about how, according to Census Bureau statistics, rural America is stagnating while cities are booming. But this weekend The New York Times took issue with this narrative and insisted that, in fact, income in rural America is growing, too.

The debate is about two lines in the recent Census Bureau report. According to the study, while incomes in metropolitan areas grew six percent, those in rural areas fell by two percent.

The Daily Yonder

The economic recovery continues apace in America’s cities. Unfortunately, reports The Daily Yonder, the same can’t be said of rural America.

While median household incomes improved for metropolitan areas last year, they did not improve for rural Americans. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, average rural residents saw their wages remain flat or even fall a bit from 2014 to 2015.

artbandito / Creative Commons

Economies are continuing to weaken among ten Western and High Plains states with large rural populations, reports The Columbia Missourian. The info comes from a monthly survey of bankers. Those surveyed hailed from Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming.

USDA / Rural Blog

Many rural areas in America are becoming less reliant on agriculture and more oil and gas dependent, reports The Rural Blog. According to the USDA, over the last ten years the number of farming dependent counties in the US has dropped. In that same period, the number of mining-dependent counties grew by 60 percent.

Organic Trade Association

A new study shows that organic agriculture boosts local economies, reports The Rural Blog. The study looked at counties with high levels of organic agricultural activity. Researchers then looked at how these organic hotspots impact the local economies. The study discovered that being in an “organic hotspot” increased median household income by more than $2,000 a year. Organic farming was also found to lower a county's poverty rate.

Prowers Journal

The employment situation in Colorado continues to boom, reports The Prowers Journal. Nonfarm payroll jobs increased by almost six thousand last month. That brings the total for the state up to well over two-and-a-half million jobs. At the same time, the unemployment rate decreased one-tenth of a percentage point to 2.9 percent—far below the national average.

theoptimist.com

The agriculture industry is entering a new period. This most recent stage is called margin compression, reports CattleNetwork.com. It occurs when revenues are depressed and costs remain elevated.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

From Harvest Public Media:

There are mounting concerns about the direction of the farm economy. The U.S. Department of Agriculture expects farm income to fall for the third year in a row in 2016. At the same time, farmers are borrowing billions more from banks to get by.

John's Photography / Creative Commons

The economy in the rural parts of ten Western states is likely to slow down, according to a new survey. The Denver Post reports that weak crop and energy prices are hurting profits across the region. This could lead to a rural economy slump. The survey queried bankers from Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wyoming.