Sand Creek Massacre

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For decades, Tobe Zweygardt guided busloads and carloads of visitors through the Arikaree Breaks in northwest Kansas – an area reminiscent of a sort of miniature Grand Canyon.

As The Wichita Eagle reports, Zweygardt, who also welded and sculpted signs from old farm and implement parts and marked routes along the breaks, died Sunday at the age of 101.

National Park Service

Southeast Colorado’s Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site was dedicated April 28th, 2007 with the goal of educating the public about the 1864 massacre of over 230 men, women and children of the Cheyenne and Arapahoe tribes by units of the United States Army.

The site is hosting the following events over the next three days in commemoration of its 10th anniversary:

http://www.sandcreeksite.com/

The National Park Service is seeking volunteers to help with increasing visitation to the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Eads, Colorado.

As The Prowers Journal reports, the Cheyenne and Arapaho village was brutally attacked by units of the United States Army in 1864. The ensuing massacre of over 230 men, women and children caused a national furor.

http://www.sandcreeksite.com/

The Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site and Bent’s Old Fort – both in southeastern Colorado – saw an uptick in visitors in 2016.

As The Prowers Journal reports, the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Chivington, Colorado - the site of the 1864 attack by U.S. volunteer soldiers on a village of Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians that left 230 mostly women, children and elderly dead - hosted almost 1,000 more visitors in 2016 than in 2015.

Link between Sand Creek and Ferguson

Dec 7, 2014
Andy Cross / The Denver Post

Weekend remembrances drew 1,000 visitors to the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site to recognize those brutally killed 150 years ago on November 29.

Nearly 150 years later, the Sand Creek Massacre remains a wound that has not yet fully healed.  This is evident in the recent closing of a permanent exhibit at the History Colorado Center in Denver exploring the 1864 massacre as part of its Colorado Stories section.  The closing was prompted by concerns of Cheyenne and Arapaho tribal members over aspects of the exhibit’s interpretation and the lack of prior consultation, according to a complete story in the Denver Post.  A reopening is pending the state and tribes reaching a consensus on the exhibit.

A survivor of the Sand Creek Massacre became a famous figure in Native American History.