Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site

National Park Service

Southeast Colorado’s Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site was dedicated April 28th, 2007 with the goal of educating the public about the 1864 massacre of over 230 men, women and children of the Cheyenne and Arapahoe tribes by units of the United States Army.

The site is hosting the following events over the next three days in commemoration of its 10th anniversary:

http://www.sandcreeksite.com/

The National Park Service is seeking volunteers to help with increasing visitation to the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Eads, Colorado.

As The Prowers Journal reports, the Cheyenne and Arapaho village was brutally attacked by units of the United States Army in 1864. The ensuing massacre of over 230 men, women and children caused a national furor.

http://www.sandcreeksite.com/

The Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site and Bent’s Old Fort – both in southeastern Colorado – saw an uptick in visitors in 2016.

As The Prowers Journal reports, the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Chivington, Colorado - the site of the 1864 attack by U.S. volunteer soldiers on a village of Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians that left 230 mostly women, children and elderly dead - hosted almost 1,000 more visitors in 2016 than in 2015.

coloradopreservation.org/

2016 is the centennial year of the National Park Service.  President Obama’s budget request for the coming year includes $3 billion for the bureau’s critical conservation, preservation, and recreation mission reports the Lamar Ledger.  That’s a boost of almost $433 million.

The national parks in southeastern Colorado plan on using the increase to add seasonal park rangers, deliver more educational programs, and address maintenance backlogs.

Alexa Roberts is the superintendent of Bent’s Old Fort and Sand Creek Massacre National Historic sites.  She says the President’s budget highlights the importance of investing in a historic effort to attract and host more visitors.  It also helps leverage additional private philanthropy for the parks. 

Link between Sand Creek and Ferguson

Dec 7, 2014
Andy Cross / The Denver Post

Weekend remembrances drew 1,000 visitors to the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site to recognize those brutally killed 150 years ago on November 29.

Sand Creek Massacre Remembered

Oct 27, 2014
gsswdenver.wordpress.com

Condemned by Congress, the Sand Creek Massacre marked the plains with blood, sparking warfare from Texas to the Canadian border. On the morning of November 29, 1864, U.S. Army Volunteers attacked a peaceful camp of Cheyenne and Arapaho, mutilated the dead, and looted the village. The massacre left behind about two hundred Cheyenne and Arapaho dead and many more wounded, with women and children comprising two-thirds of the casualties according to articles from the National Park Service.