Shona Banda

Banda Accepts Plea Deal, Plans Move to Washington

Aug 10, 2017
WICHITA EAGLE

Shona Banda of Garden City, Kansas, a well-known advocate of medicinal marijuana, has accepted a plea deal.

As KSN reports, Banda accepted a plea deal from Finney County on the child endangerment and marijuana-related charges against her in exchange for probation.

FINNEY COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE

The trial of Shona Banda, a well-known advocate of medicinal marijuana, has been postponed.

As The Garden City Telegram reports, the trial was postponed from its original starting date of June 26 to Aug. 14 after Chief District Judge Wendel Wurst granted a request for continuance by Banda’s defense team.

FINNEY COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE

Shona Banda, a well-known advocate of medicinal marijuana, pleaded not guilty to drug and child endangerment charges Friday during an arraignment and pretrial conference at the Finney County Courthouse, where two doctors well-known in the field of cannabis also testified.

Finney County Sheriff's Office

The Garden City woman charged with endangering a child and drug-related crimes  was ruled mentally competent to stand trial Tuesday.

As The Garden City Telegram reports, Chief District Judge Wendel Wurst ruled that Shona Banda, well known as a proponent of cannabis oil use for treatment for her Crohn’s disease, was competent to stand trial, scheduled from June 26 to 29.

Kansas resident, Shona Banda, faces five counts, four of them marijuana related. Banda was booked into jail, and later released after posting $50,000 bond. If convicted on all counts, she could be looking at 30 years behind bars. Sarah Swain, of Lawrence, is her attorney. She says cannabis oil cured Banda of her Crohn’s Disease, and if she goes to prison and can’t get that treatment, she will likely die. According to Swain, Banda has been without the oil since her home was raided, and has lost a dramatic amount of weight, as a result. She’s also had to undergo oral surgery, due to infections that Swain says had been kept at bay by cannabis oil. Swain’s goal is to take Banda’s case all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, if necessary, to stop marijuana from being classified as a Schedule 1 drug, defined as having no medicinal value.

khi.org

The case of a medical marijuana activist in Garden City who lost custody of her son after the boy spoke up at a school anti-drug event has stirred legalization advocates.