Tyson Foods

Vertical integration
8:00 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Hog farmers split on packer-owned pigs

Jim Knopik used to raise 500 hogs each year in a confinement building on his farm in Fullerton, Neb., but now his family only raises 50 in an open air pen. He downsized as contracting and consolidation became larger parts of the pork industry.
Credit Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

Nebraska hog farmers aren’t seeing eye-to-eye on a proposal that would allow meatpacking companies more control over the state’s hog industry. And farmers all over the country are watching.

Currently, a 1998 state law bans meatpacking companies from owning and raising the hogs they process. But lawmakers have proposed an end to the ban, which would allow for more vertical integration of the hog industry.

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Harvest Public Media story
6:15 am
Mon October 28, 2013

In the Shadows of the Slaughterhouse: Noel, MO Schools build safety net for immigrant children

At the primary school in rural Noel, Mo., teachers and staff function as educators about as often as they do de facto social workers.
Credit Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

Hear the audio version of Abbie's story

NOEL, MO - It’s almost 9 a.m., and Noel Primary School teacher Erin McPherson is helping a group of Spanish-speaking students complete English language exercises. But it’s tough going.

One student in a bright blue T-shirt – 9-year-old Isac Martinez – has not yet picked up his pencil. He’s clearly sick. When McPherson asks him what’s wrong, Isac’s small voice is barely audible in between coughs. He says he threw up four times last night but did not go to a doctor.

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Harvest Public Media story
8:00 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Tyson suspends use of controversial cattle feeding drug

Credit oklahomafarmreport.com

Tyson Foods, Inc., announced last week that it will soon suspend purchases of cattle that had been treated with a controversial drug, citing animal welfare concerns.

But many in the industry wonder if the real reason is not about cattle, but rather the battle for sales in other countries, where using drugs for meat production is banned.

“I really do think this is more a marketing ploy from Tyson to raise some awareness so they can garner some export business from our overseas export partners,” said Dan Norcini, an independent commodities broker.

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