water conservation gardening methods

You might remember that last week we reviewed important insider intel' about how to keep High Plains gardens growing without wasting water.

Today’s installment of Growing on the High Plains continues this topic, so as not to leave anyone high and dry when it comes to best practices regarding conservation.  

Going it Alone

Apr 12, 2017
EMHKE

VANCE:   Hey! I'm Vance Ehmke and we farm in Lane County KS. Today Louise and I are going to talk about stretching water.

LOUISE: While most people in western Kansan would like to conserve irrigation water,can one man go it alone?

VANCE: 40 years ago I was up at K-State talking with ag economist Don Pretzer about ways to conserve the Ogallala aquifer. And he made a very good observation.

Ian MacKenzie / Flickr Creative Commons

Did you know it’s against the law to collect rainwater and use it to water your plants in Colorado? In fact, Colorado is the only state in the country where it’s illegal to capture rainwater for use at a later time. And now, reports member station KVNF, lawmakers are debating whether to change that law. If changed, the legislation would allow residents to use rain barrels to collect precipitation that falls from their roofs.

Cindee Talley

Techniques that make every drop of water count in your xeriscape beds include how much, how often, and how to apply that gardener's liquid gold.  The importance of soil preparation is also discussed this week.  

Today we'll make our final visit to Amarillo and the High Plains Food Bank, where we'll be investigating the task of watering the large plot that provides food for so many in the Texas Panhandle.