Prepare for Fall Weather Hazards

Oct 16, 2015
Public Domain

Autumn on the High Plains means time with family, a return to school, and a crisp chill in the air as the sun sets over rippling fields. But it can also mean winds, droughts, and floods. As fall descends and winter approaches, here is a friendly reminder from NOAA that now is the time to prepare for upcoming inclement weather and hazards. Here’s what High Plains residents can do to prepare for the season:

1. Know Your Risk

The month of March

Mar 20, 2015

If you live on the Southern High Plains and you like to grow things, then you know what a gamble spring planting dates are.  Just when you think you'll have some early goodies to gather in a few weeks, a blizzard can rear its ugly head down in the Southwest and sweep across our part of the world in nothing flat, leaving us with seedbeds under a foot or two of snow.  In our part of the world, March comes in like a lion and often leaves with another mighty roar.  

Climate patterns from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans have magnified the Texas drought, but that could be changing. A word of caution, the next drought could be worse.

ali eminov/Flickr

Corn and soybean farmers expect a record harvest this year. And that’s after bringing in a record corn crop last year along with one of the largest soybean crops in history.

For once, farmers can thank the weather. It’s been an ideal growing season in much of the Corn Belt with just enough sun and rain to push yields to the limit.

You may think that we’ve had good rainfall in recent weeks.  Or you might feel it’s been as dry as ever.  Across the High Plains either situation could be the case.  While the latest drought maps shows general improvement across the region, a closer look shows a very hit or miss picture with the percentage of normal precipitation varying widely from locale to locale.

The storm chaser known online as Twisterfiddler posted video recently of an impressive dust cloud rolling over southwest Kansas.

In order to provide notification of severe weather to the public, most of HPPR’s transmitter sites are equipped to continuously monitor the National Weather Service (NWS) and immediately interrupt regular programming and directly broadcast any severe weather warning issued by the NWS.  These warnings include severe thunderstorm and tornado warnings. 

The list below identifies the counties covered by this notification service.  Next to the county is the HPPR station(s) to tune to in order to hear the NWS warnings.