West Texas

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Last week, Amarillo unveiled the first historic Route 66 sign along the famed route that traverses the city.

As The Amarillo Globe-News reports, State Sen. Kel Seliger and State Rep. Four Price were on hand to celebrate the sign’s reveal.

Dora Meroney is the president of the Old Route 66 Association of Texas, and she said she hopes to erect signs along the entire 178-mile stretch of the former highway in the panhandle.

From Texas Standard.

The next full moon falls on June 27. In the west Texas desert near Marfa – if you are in the high desert grasslands just east of town – you may spot an unlikely arrangement of large black or granite stones like a Texas Stonehenge. As the sun sets on that day, that megalith will begin to come to life.

Jonathan Baker

Many folks in the Texas Panhandle experience cognitive dissonance when hearing our homeland referred to as “West Texas”—especially those of us who’ve ever seen a map. The Panhandle is most certainly not in the western part of the state. It could be called “Northwest Texas”—and it sometimes is—but truly, the Panhandle should be classified as North Texas.

Adavyd / Wikimedia Commons

Deep inside a West Texas mountain lies a clock.

The mechanical timepiece, which rests inside a peak of the Sierra Diablo mountain range along the Texas-Mexico border, is 50 stories high. It ticks once per year.

The clock has a century hand that advances once every century, and every thousand years a cuckoo emerges from the clock to mark the passing of another millennium.

Large Portions Of West Texas Sinking At Alarming Rate, New Report Finds

Mar 26, 2018
Rafael Aguilera

Nearly two years after a pair of giant West Texas sinkholes gained national attention, new research in the area shows they likely won't be the last in the region.

report released Thursday by geophysicists at Southern Methodist University says a 4,000-square-mile area near the "Wink Sinks" is showing signs of alarming instability.

Texas Standard

This week the radio newsmagazine Texas Standard asked a question that Panhandle folks have been wondering for years. Where exactly does West Texas begin? And why are those of us in the northernmost part of the state referred to as “West Texans”?

The answer, surprisingly , may have to do with oak trees.

Pipeline in West Texas draws a protest of its own

Dec 13, 2016
Forest Guardians / Wikimedia Commons

There’s another pipeline protest and this one is not in North Dakota. It’s in Texas.

Flcelloguy / Wikimedia Commons

West Texas has experienced one of its worst oil slumps ever in recent years. But this week, as the Wall Street Journal reports, there are signs that a long-awaited recovery may be coming soon.

A recent Wall Street land grab in the Permian Basin has energized the market, and sent some shares soaring. Blackstone Group LP announced last week that it has agreed to invest $1.5 billion toward drilling in West Texas.

Randall Derrick

Texas Panhandle independent filmmaker Randall Derrick will be releasing a film this weekend in Amarillo. The movie examines a mysterious and little-known incident in Llano history.

Perjury of Time explores the true story of a double mass homicide that occurred along the Canadian River about 1450 AD. Archaeologists excavating in the Canadian River flood plain near Fritch discovered a Native American burial that contained the complete skeletons of twenty-one men, women and children. Eleven skulls without bodies were also uncovered.

Texas A&M

A species of minnow that has eluded scientists for over a century has been found hiding out in West Texas, reports UPI.com. It all occurred thanks to a case of mistaken identity.

Notropis megalops, the West Texas shiner, closely resembles the Texas shiner, Notropis amabilis. But scientists at Texas A&M have examined the minnow’s DNA and confirmed the species distinction.