wheat

Kansas wheat harvest yields a mixed bag

Jun 28, 2017
CC0 Public Domain

Wheat harvest is in full swing across the High Plains and according to Kansas Wheat, yields in the Sunflower State have been a mixed bag.

According to day 12 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest reports, Irsik and Doll Feed Service of Pierceville reported yields of 30 to 40 bushels per acre, while Mid State Farmers Coop of Rush Center reported average yields of 45 to 50 bushels per acre. The highest average yields reported by the WaKeeney branch of Frontier Ag, Inc., were in the 40s.

USDA boosts forecast for wheat production

Jun 12, 2017
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE

The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Friday boosted its forecast for wheat production.

As Reuters reports, the USDA raised its forecast for overall winter wheat production from 1.246 billion bushels to 1.250 billion bushels

The report was expected to reflect a decrease in overall production to 1.239 billion bushels.

Wheat ‘a dead man walking’ type crop?

May 23, 2017
Louise Ehmke

The grain traders in Chicago are thinking that the damage to the Kansas wheat crop from the late-season blizzard and freezing temperatures …is only modest. After all, it’s standing up now and field after field looks like it has 70-bushel yield potential. But Jim Shroyer says, “They may have a bad surprise waiting for them.”

After a trip through west-central and southwest Kansas on May 9, Shroyer, K-State Extension wheat specialist emeritus, says much of the wheat he looked at does look great.

Sandra J. Milburn / The Hutchinson News

There’s an old saying that wheat has nine lives.

But in western Kansas, farmers have pretty much used all of them.

Yet, despite just about every plague imaginable that could strike this year’s stand – including snow, freeze and disease – farmers aren’t writing off the 2017 wheat just yet.

“I’ve been told my entire life – never give up on the western Kansas wheat crop,” said Trevor Witt, agronomist and sales manager at the Garden City Co-op who has been scouting wheat fields after the late April snowstorm.

Farmers mad about wheat streak mosaic

May 4, 2017
Courtesy / Vance Ehmke

In one of the most severe and extensive wheat streak mosaic epidemics in untold years, western Kansas farmers are not happy. And they’re letting their attorneys, legislators and farm organizations know about.

Justin Gilpin / Kansas Wheat

But the electricity is out at his Stanton County farm, where at least 14 inches of snow blankets his wheat fields.

Amid a slumping farm economy, it might seem like a disaster with harvest just weeks away. But Sipes has seen wheat weather many calamities.

“I never count wheat out,” he said.

It will be a week to 10 days before western Kansas farmers know the outcome of the weekend snowstorm, which closed highways and canceled schools.

BRIAN MCGUIRK / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

U.S. wheat futures increased more than 2 percent Monday as frost across key growing regions stoked fears of widespread production losses, pushing prices to a six-week high.

As Reuters reports, at one point Monday, wheat futures on the Chicago Board of Trade rose to $4.43 a bushel, the highest since March 10.

Andrew Woodhouse, grains analyst at Advance Trading in Australasia, said with frost through Kansas, Colorado, and Oklahoma, the market is concerned about crop damage.

Wheat's merit debated as acreage falls

Feb 16, 2017
Travis Morrise / The Hutchinson News

While farmers across the central plains were gradually easing away from planting wheat, the Horton brothers were doubling down.

Over the past 10 years, Rick Horton and his younger brothers Matt and Alec put together a business at Leoti, Kansas, that consists of portable wheat seed cleaning and seed treatment along with selling certified seed from more than a dozen varieties they test annually on their own farm.

Mattie Hagedorn / Wikimedia Commons

Researchers say U.S. adults only get half their recommended amount of daily fiber. That can cause many of us to reach for “whole grain” breads at the grocery store.

But now, as TIME magazine reports, nutritionists are warning consumers to be careful not to get duped. Not all whole grains are created equal.

An international study published in the journal, Nature Communications, reports that harvests in the United States are likely to shrink by a between one-fifth to half their current sizes due to rising temperatures over the next century.

Down times in farm country persist, but not yet a ‘crisis’

Jan 17, 2017
Elliot Chapman

Farmers across the Midwest are trying to figure out how to get by at a time when expected prices for commodities from corn, to wheat, to cattle, to hogs mean they’ll be struggling just to break even.

“Prices are low, bins are full, and the dollar is strengthening as we speak and that’s just making the export thing a little more challenging,” says Paul Burgener of Platte Valley Bank in Scottsbluff, Nebraska.

NET_EFEKT / Flickr Creative Commons

The High Plains has long been wheat country. And we’re not alone. Wheat is grown on more land than any other crop in the world.

But, as Bloomberg reports, wheat markets have been glutted for a long while now, and many farmers are turning to other crops as a result. Many parts of the world have seen four straight seasons of record harvests.

Watch: Down times have farmers looking to cut costs

Jan 9, 2017
Harvest Public Media

The federal government expected net farm income and farm profits to fall in 2016, the third-straight year of declines. That means farmers and ranchers are taking a closer look at their finances, and many aren’t very optimistic about their prospects for 2017.

Creative Commons

Wheat farmers have historically used grain futures to hedge against low grain prices, but many are losing faith in the tactic.

Kansas wheat crop facing drought

Dec 13, 2016
Brian McGuirk / Flickr Creative Commons

The condition of the winter wheat crop in Kansas is varied because of a lack of moisture.

Jeanne Falk / K-State Research and Extension

The High Plains has seen unusually mild fall temperatures, even reaching record highs in many areas.

But now the temperatures are dropping and the question becomes, how will the weather switch affect High Plains farmland?

More specifically, after the unseasonable warmth, will winter wheat be ready for the drop in temperatures? As AgProfessional.com reports, the short answer is, “Probably so.”

The world wheat market is showing signs of life, despite recent struggles.

Creative Commons

Wheat is falling out of favor in Kansas, reports Farm Futures.

Wheat acreage may be reduced by as much as five percent this fall. That means, in the autumn of 2016, Kansas will record its fewest wheat acres in more than 100 years. Most of the decline can be attributed to low prices and a late soybean harvest. Wheat hasn’t been as profitable as other crops lately, and current prices show that trend continuing.

Wheat as We Grow It

Jul 13, 2016
Kansas Agland

From Kansas Agland:

From the way it is grown, harvested and processed into flour, and the way it's entwined in the lives of the families who produce it, wheat's journey is an emotional one.

In a time where agricultural practices are questioned at every turn, it's important to look at what's being done to keep our food safe while conserving the environment while providing enough food for the earth's inhabitants.

Jolie Green / Kansas Agland

From Kansas Agland:

For the first time nearly 15 years, the price of wheat is so low that government loan programs have once again kicked in.

Amy Bickel / Hutchinson News

From Kansas Agland:

CASTLETON – For Sam Grilliot, it’s harvest time, and that means the old Oliver is lumbering through the wheat field.

More often, you find similar antique combines abandoned in a hedgerow. But for Grilliot, the 50-year-old machine is one of the tools he depends on each year.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Despite a delayed wheat harvest this year, Oklahoma may be looking at one of the strongest ingatherings in recent memory, reports KGOU. That’s because heavy rains caused the delay. For the second year in a row, Mother Nature was kind to Oklahoma farmers. Nevertheless, many farmers are still recovering from years of drought that only recently retreated. Even worse: Some climatologists warn the drought might be returning soon.

Andrew Whitaker / Hutchinson News

The annual wheat harvest has begun in Kansas. Kansas Agland captured farmers Brett Mott and Russell Molz cutting wheat and delivering it to the grain elevator. Photos by The Hutchinson News's Andrew Whitaker.

James M. Dobson / Garden City Telegram

With all the recent rains, farmers in southwest Kansas have a bright outlook for the wheat crop and summer harvest, reports The Garden City Telegram. Finney County farmer Jarvis Garetson called the April showers a godsend. “It changed our dryland crops from poor conditions to very good,” he said.

Brian McGuirk / Flickr Creative Commons

The Wheat Quality Council’s annual hard red winter tour began last week across the High Plains, reports High Plains/Midwest Ag Journal. The event was founded in 1938 with the goal of improving wheat quality in the US. The tour posted a record number of stops this year—and finished up with some good news. 2016 showed the best day one yield result in four years.

NDSU

Kansas’s winter wheat crop has received a timely boost from Mother Nature, reports The Garden City Telegram. After threats of a returning drought, recent rains brought yearly rain totals up past normal amounts for this time of year.

All Hail Wheat

Feb 22, 2016
Miami U. Libraries - Digital Collections / Wikimedia Commons

Last week the Mother Nature Network published an essay in praise of wheat. Wheat isn’t sexy, noted the article. There are no heirloom varieties. It’s not brightly colored or wild-caught or free-range. Foodies don’t go bananas over wheat. But today, wheat is grown on more land area worldwide than any other food crop.

The Fight Against Broadleaf Weeds in Winter Wheat

Feb 9, 2016
agriculturewire.com

From Kansas Agland:

Most of the wheat and weeds are inactive during cold weather; however, that can quickly change in the Midwest. While broadleaf weeds are dormant, wheat producers can get a jump-start on managing them in winter wheat.

Western Kansas Wheat Crop Looking Good

Dec 10, 2015
KTIC radio

Western Kansas farmers have found themselves in a position they haven’t experienced in years, reports KTIC. The wheat crop is off to a healthy-looking start. Farmers aren’t sure if this early growth will translate into bushels next summer, but late November storms have left the wheat looking good.

Edmund Garman / Flickr Creative Commons

Smith Center, KS, physician Joe Barnes is a hunter. He purchased farm land for hunting, and was disappointed the land looked so barren following harvest. He was consulted by Pheasants Forever Farm Bill biologist Tyson Seirer on ways Barnes and his tenant producer could make crop fields more hospitable for pheasant and quail at little additional expense.

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