A Journey around Colorado's Ghost Towns

18 minutes ago
Diddley Squat / ghosttowns.com

Looking for something fun to do this summer? Why not grab a camera and go hunting for Colorado’s forgotten past? The website ghosttowns.com has a Colorado section, with helpful interactive maps, where you can learn about towns like Tuttle, in Kit Carson County, which was a US Post Office for the Pony Express, or Boggsville in Bent County, which was the final home of Kit Carson, or Chivington in Kiowa County, where the old dilapidated schoolhouse still stands out on the open plains.

dr_relling / Creative Commons

Three water managers in Colorado have stated that the state might have enough water to sustain it in the future, despite dwindling resources, climate change, and a growing population. However, these experts stressed that the state MUST be smart about its water and use it wisely, reports Colorado Public Radio. Colorado’s first state water plan, which is available now for viewing, will be finalized in December.

Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Here’s a quiz: the nation’s most inland seaport exists in what state? There are pretty good odds you didn’t guess Oklahoma, but in fact the Port of Catoosa handles two and a half million tons of wheat, fertilizer, steel, and manufacturing goods each year.

From outside of Tulsa, these resources head down the Verdigris River, to the Arkansas River, then east to the Mississippi and onward to Pittsburgh and Chicago. From there, these goods can move up through the great lakes to New York, Europe, or anywhere in the world.

Data Breach May Affect Thousands of Kansans

3 hours ago
Jfcherry / Creative Commons

From the Kansas Health Institute:

Company that provides online patient portal says hackers gained access to electronic health records.

Thousands of Kansans soon will be receiving letters notifying them that their electronic health records may have been compromised.

Slideshow: Kansas's Dwindling Water Resources

Jul 28, 2015
Travis Heying / Wichita Eagle

For decades, Kansas farmers have relied on an ancient underground reservoir to provide water for their crops. But now the aquifer is drying up, reports The Wichita Eagle. Most farmers in Kansas are already feeling the effects of the depleted Ogallala aquifer. For some farmers, the energy bills for pumping water are costing more than the leases paid on the land itself. Water from the aquifer has gone down as much as 200 feet in some areas, doubling what it costs to pump it.

Texas Debates Plan to Battle Future Droughts

Jul 28, 2015
Cynthia Mendoza / Flickr Creative Commons

The current drought in Texas began in 2010. Though the situation has improved somewhat, the drought is still with us—and so are the conditions that caused it, reports StateImpact, a reporting project of local public media and NPR.

Dole Leads Effort to Build Ike Memorial

Jul 28, 2015
Public Domain

Efforts to build a national Dwight Eisenhower memorial have stalled, and Senator Bob Dole is spearheading the effort to get them back on track, the Washington Post reports. The former Republican presidential candidate served under Ike in World War II, and he has called Eisenhower “one of the great Americans.” Both Dole and Ike hail from Kansas.

Rhonda Dittfurth

The Three Redneck Tenors are back in the Texas Panhandle singing their hearts out and tickling funny bones.  Group members, Matthew Lord, Blake Davidson, and Jonathon Fruge followed different paths to return to the area.  

KUHF

The United States is producing so much oil these days that there aren’t enough pipelines to get it to refineries along the Gulf Coast. The solution: railroads. And many community activists are concerned that not enough is being done to prepare for crude fires and train derailments in residential communities, says StateImpact, a reporting project of NPR stations.

Bryan Thompson / KHI News Service

From the Kansas Health Institute:

A new partnership in southwest Kansas aims to build mental health services and help strengthen a couple of rural hospitals at the same time.

The nonprofit United Methodist Health Ministry Fund is leading an effort to make the health system work better for people in rural Kansas. The fund’s president, Kim Moore, said the current structure based on small, low-volume hospitals isn’t likely to survive long-term.

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