World
1:29 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Even Presidents Struggle To Keep Their Dignity

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 1:30 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Kenneth Turan is the film critic for the Los Angeles Times and NPR's Morning Edition, as well as the director of the Los Angeles Times Book Prizes. He has been a staff writer for the Washington Post and TV Guide, and served as the Times' book review editor.

Afghanistan
11:41 pm
Tue May 22, 2012

Afghan Public Protection Force Profile

A U.S. soldier watches members of the Afghan Public Protection Force arrive at the transition ceremony on the outskirts of the Afghan capital Kabul on March 15. The APPF replaces all private security contractors in the country.
Ahmad Jamshid AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 4:54 am

Nearly two years ago, Afghan President Hamid Karzai ordered that gun-toting private security companies in his country be brought under state control. But the Afghan force to replace the foreign-funded contractors is off to a rocky start.

According to the U.S. Special Inspector General for Afghan Reconstruction (SIGAR), the new force will increase security costs for USAID projects and could even shut some of them down, at a loss of about $899 million. USAID in Kabul disagrees, and the dispute has gone public.

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Middle East
11:41 pm
Tue May 22, 2012

Voting Opens In Egypt's Historical Election

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 12:22 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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Business
11:41 pm
Tue May 22, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 1:22 am

Gucci sued Guess over trademark infringement, citing multiple cases of designs it claimed were "studied imitations of Gucci trademarks

Movies
11:41 pm
Tue May 22, 2012

65th Annual Cannes Film Festival Opens In France

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 12:09 am

The movie being talked about the most at this year's Cannes Film Festival in the south of France is Michael Haneke's Amour. It's the 65th anniversary of the festival.

Allison Keyes is an award-winning journalist with almost 20 years of experience in print, radio, and television. She has been reporting for NPR's national desk since October 2005. Her reports can be heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition Sunday.

Andrea Smardon is new at KUER, but sheâââ

Around the Nation
10:40 pm
Tue May 22, 2012

Identity Theft: 'Kids Don't Know They're Victims'

Jennifer Andrushko says she worries about the long-term consequences for her 5-year-old son, Carter, after the theft of his Social Security number.
Courtesy of Jennifer Andrushko

Originally published on Tue May 22, 2012 11:41 pm

Carter Andrushko is 5 years old, and he knows a few things already: He knows how to spell his name. He knows that Crusty, his hermit crab, has 10 legs. And he knows what he wants to do when he grows up: look for dinosaur bones.

According to the Utah Department of Workforce Services, however, Carter already has a job. In fact, according to that office, he's been working since before he was even born. That's what Carter's mother, Jennifer Andrushko, discovered when she applied for Medicaid in 2009 and found out that someone had been using Carter's Social Security number for years.

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Around the Nation
10:38 pm
Tue May 22, 2012

Fight Over Flame Retardants In Furniture Heats Up

More than 80 percent of furniture sold in the U.S. is treated with flame-retardant chemicals.
Steve Mullis/NPR

Originally published on Tue May 22, 2012 11:41 pm

If you pick up a cushion from any sofa or piece of furniture that has foam, you're likely to find a small white tag that reads: "This article meets all flammability requirements of California Bureau of Home Furnishings technical bulletin 117."

The law, referred to as TB 117, was passed in California in 1975. It says that the foam inside upholstered furniture must be able to resist a flame, such as from a cigarette lighter or a candle. Rather than make different furniture just for California, big furniture makers adhere to those standards in all 50 states and even Canada.

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