World
2:08 am
Fri May 18, 2012

Police Wait For Thief To Release His Loot

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 11:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
1:50 am
Fri May 18, 2012

Sudents Suspended Over Post-It Note Prank

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 11:49 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Business
1:34 am
Fri May 18, 2012

Facebook To Begin Trading On Nasdaq

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 11:49 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL RINGING)

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

There you have it, the sound of money. Mark Zuckerberg rang the opening bell for the NASDAQ stock exchange this morning. Facebook, his company, is going public today. The company's shares start trading under the ticker symbol FB. And we talked about one of the largest IPOs, initial public offerings, in history with NPR's Steve Henn.

OK. When we say one of the largest in history, how big is it here?

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Economy
1:30 am
Fri May 18, 2012

G8 Summit To Discus Greece's Troubled Economy

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 11:49 am

Greece keeps cutting its budget to help pay debts and avoid default but then its economy keeps contracting, making the problem worse. The new French President Francois Hollande wants to find a way to stimulate Europe's economy.

Election 2012
11:48 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

GOP Group Abandons Racially Tinged Attack Ad

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 11:49 am

Mitt Romney is disavowing a plan by some wealthy Republicans to attack President Obama for ties to his controversial former pastor. Even the people behind that proposal said they are abandoning it after their idea was plastered on the front page of The New York Times.

The proposal centered on the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, who was a mentor to Obama before the two parted ways during the last presidential campaign.

Republicans unaffiliated with Romney were considering spending $10 million on a racially tinged advertising campaign tying Wright to the president.

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Business
11:48 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

Hewlett-Packard Set To Layoff 30,000 People

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 11:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with layoffs at HP.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Technology giant Hewlett-Packard is poised to eliminate as many as 30,000 jobs worldwide. These cuts, though, will reportedly spare China - the company's largest source of growth, as well as its research and development divisions.

NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

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Business
11:48 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 11:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: free flight - to somewhere less exotic than Nepal.

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Law
11:48 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

Evidence Sheds Light On Trayvon Martin Shooting

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 11:49 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Americans now have a little more information on which to base their debate about Trayvon Martin. The teenager's killing in Florida - where he was shot by a man named George Zimmerman - prompted an intense and politically charged national discussion about violence, about gun laws and about race.

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Business
11:48 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

Did Bank's Culture Lead To JPMorgan's Big Loss?

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 11:49 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The head of JPMorgan Chase, Jamie Dimon, has gotten an invitation to testify in front of the Senate Banking Committee about his bank's recent trading loss of at least $2 billion.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Dimon is very much the public face of his firm. In a Wall Street culture where banks are defined as much by the executives who run them is by the assets they hold. So, what kind of culture led to the multibillion dollar losses at JPMorgan Chase?

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Nell Greenfieldboyce is a NPR science correspondent.

With reporting focused on general science, NASA, and the intersection between technology and society, Greenfieldboyce has been on the science desk's technology beat since she joined NPR in 2005.

In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs.

Much of Greenfieldboyce's reporting reflects an interest in discovering how applied science and technology connects with people and culture. She has worked on stories spanning issues such as pet cloning, gene therapy, ballistics, and federal regulation of new technology.

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