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Game 2 of the World Series begins at 7 p.m. ET in Cleveland. Rain is forecast so the game will start an hour earlier than originally scheduled.

The Indians, who lead the best-of-seven series 1-0, will send Trevor Bauer to the mound. The Cubs' hopes of getting a split before the series heads to Chicago rests with 2015 Cy Young award winner Jake Arrieta.

The Cubs are already in a tough spot. As ESPN reports, Game 1 losers have lost the past six World Series.

Hillary Clinton's campaign has been dealing with the fallout from her choice to use a private email server while secretary of state since before there was even officially a campaign. Now, WikiLeaks has released private emails from March 2015 between Clinton advisers talking about how to handle the email mess.

Clinton's campaign says the email release is part of a Russian effort to interfere with the U.S. election. The campaign has chosen not to verify the authenticity of the emails hacked from the personal Gmail account of Clinton's campaign chairman John Podesta.

If it's true that misery loves company, then the heartbreaking failures of the Chicago Cubs over the last century certainly cemented bonds through generations of fans.

The Cubs are in the World Series for the first time in 71 years, and they haven't won the fall classic since 1908.

That makes this year's success somewhat bittersweet for many fans in Chicago, who remember parents, grandparents, spouses and other loved ones who didn't live long enough to see this day.

Workers in California's hospitals and doctors' offices may be less likely to get hit, kicked, bitten or grabbed under workplace standards adopted by a state workplace safety board.

Huge crowds of demonstrators rallied in the streets of Venezuela's capital and in cities across the country, after authorities halted a campaign to hold a recall election intended to oust the country's deeply unpopular president, Nicolas Maduro.

Imagine: the chance to live on an uninhabited tropical island for a month, off the grid, creating art.

No phone, no television, no Internet.

Instead, spectacular night skies, crystalline turquoise waters and extraordinary marine life on the coral reef just a short swim from your back door.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Polls show the presidential race in Texas is closer than it's been in decades, some even showing the two candidates within the margin of error.

Does Hillary Clinton actually stand a chance in Texas? It's unlikely, but it could be closer than at any time in the last 20 years. The reason for how competitive the race looks lies in two demographic groups — Republican-leaning suburban women offended by Trump's comments about women and Latinos, who are fired up to vote against him.

Suburban women cool to Trump

Donald Trump's star dimmed a bit on Wednesday. Actually, it was smashed. An early morning vandal dressed as a Los Angeles city construction worker used a pickax and sledgehammer to destroy Trump's sidewalk star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

As Hillary Clinton traverses battleground states across the country in the final stretch of the election, Donald Trump paid a visit Wednesday to the solidly Democratic, tiny District of Columbia.

He wasn't there for D.C.'s votes.

Trump was attending the opening of the Trump International Hotel Washington, D.C., in what is known as the Old Post Office building on Pennsylvania Avenue, blocks from the White House.

It's now official: Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio has been formally charged with criminal contempt of court, with prosecutors saying he disobeyed a judge's order in a racial profiling case. The sheriff for much of the Phoenix metro area could face up to six months behind bars if convicted.

The misdemeanor charge against Arpaio, 84, was formally lodged Tuesday, after U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton signed an order to show cause.

If you want to feel virtuous the next time you chug a brewski, consider the Long Root Ale. This new beer, mildly fragrant and with a rye-like spiciness, is the first to use Kernza, a kind of wheat that could make agriculture more sustainable, especially in the face of climate change.

The U.N. General Assembly votes every year on a resolution calling for an end to the U.S. embargo on Cuba. The U.S. has always opposed the symbolic measure.

But today, U.S. Ambassador to the U.N Samantha Power told the General Assembly that for the first time, the U.S. would abstain.

Today may be the day when cable and telecom execs shake their heads at Google with a smug "I told you so."

The tech giant is scaling back its plan to wire American cities for hyper-fast Internet — the project called Google Fiber.

The Walloons still aren't budging.

Thursday is supposed to be signing day in Brussels for a major free trade agreement between Canada and the European Union, an agreement seven years in the making, which involves 29 countries with a combined population of more than 500 million.

The media was lined up. Special pens were set aside. VIPs were making travel plans, including Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and many European leaders.

But the Walloons are still saying, "No deal."

Public health authorities and infectious disease specialists now say we may not be able to rid the U.S. of the Zika virus. Despite months of intense work — including house to house inspections and aggressive mosquito control — federal, state and local officials have not been able to stop the spread of Zika in Miami.

If you’ve ever donated to a political candidate — or asked for information on a campaign website — you might find your email inbox flooded with fundraising appeals, perhaps from candidates you’ve never even heard of.

Dave Davies from Here & Now contributor WHYY took a look at what kind of messages we’re getting and why there are so many of them.

The U.S. Secret Service has an aggressive hiring campaign underway. But many qualified candidates are being disqualified from the application process because of their past illegal use of prescription drugs, including Adderall.

This comes at a time when the agency is stretched thin after several controversies, and the country is in the middle of a contentious presidential election.

For more, Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with USA Today reporter Kevin Johnson, who covers national law enforcement issues and the Justice Department.

As European and Asian investors seek out safe places to put their money, many are piling into the U.S. bond market.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with CNN’s Maggie Lake about what’s happening.

West Virginia residents have settled part of a civil lawsuit over a chemical spill that contaminated drinking water for thousands of people in 2014, according to The Associated Press.

A Canadian woman who worked as a nurse has been charged with the murders of eight nursing home residents in Ontario over the course of seven years.

If Elizabeth Tracey Mae Wettlaufer is found guilty, The Globe and Mail reports, the 49-year-old woman would be "among the worst serial killers in Canadian history."

It's one of the biggest medical mysteries of our time: How did HIV come to the U.S.?

Scientists say they have figured out when and where the virus first arrived here by genetically sequencing samples from people infected by the virus early on. In the process, they have exonerated the man accused of triggering the epidemic in North America.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.


Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

The jury hearing the federal trial of seven people who occupied the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon entered a fourth day of deliberations Wednesday — a day after jurors' ability to reach a verdict came into question.

Vote flipping. The stories and conspiracy theories have begun.

In every recent election, there have been reports of voters pressing one candidate's name on a touch-screen machine, only to have the opponent's name light up instead.

It can be unnerving for voters and often leads to allegations that the machines have been "rigged" to favor one candidate over another.

The barbarians are invading Rome — again.

At least, that's the complaint of a group of Italian intellectuals protesting the "siege" of the city's cultural sites by outside enemies such as McDonald's and cheap souvenir shops.

Some 170 people have signed their names to an open letter appealing to UNESCO for help in combating the "commercial exploitation" of the ancient city.

Sharbat Gula, whose piercing stare and bright green eyes brought new attention to the plight of refugees fleeing Afghanistan in the 1980s, is now in a Pakistan jail. Gula was arrested in an investigation into identity-card fraud, local media report.

Gula, who's also known as Sharbat Bibi, is facing a possible prison sentence after federal agents arrested her in Peshawar as part of an inquiry into forged national identity cards, according to the Dawn news agency in Pakistan.

Gambia says it is withdrawing from the International Criminal Court in The Hague — the third nation to do so this month. The small West African country alleges that the court is biased against Africans.

Inside Lewisburg Prison: A Choice Between A Violent Cellmate Or Shackles

7 hours ago

On Feb. 3, 2011, corrections officers at the Lewisburg federal penitentiary in central Pennsylvania arrived outside Sebastian Richardson's cell door. With them was a man looking agitated, rocking back and forth and staring down at Richardson, who at 4 feet, 11 inches was nicknamed "Bam Bam."

The man, officers told Richardson, was his new cellmate. The two would spend nearly 24 hours a day celled together in a concrete room smaller than a parking space.

The Pentagon is suspending its debt collection program to claw back bonuses paid to thousands of California National Guard soldiers who re-enlisted to fight in Iraq and Afghanistan, with Defense Secretary Ash Carter calling the current situation "unacceptable."

Citing a duty to keep promises to service members, Carter said he's ordering the Pentagon's Defense Finance and Accounting Service to "suspend all efforts to collect reimbursement from affected California National Guard members" until he's satisfied that the process has become more efficient and fair.