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Shots - Health Blog
10:02 pm
Sun June 17, 2012

Consumers Stuck With Murky Sunscreen Labels Another Summer

Which one of these sunscreens would be considered safe and correctly labeled by the Food and Drug Administration? Not a single one. Safe sunscreens are SPF15 or higher, and the new rules require those with broad-spectrum protection to include the term next to and in the same style as the sun protection factor.
Benjamin Morris NPR

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 4:41 am

Anyone who has gone to the drug store knows that the labels on sunscreens can be confusing. The sun protection factor, or SPF, numbers are all over the place. Some say "sunblock"; others says "sunscreen." What's the difference between "waterproof" and "water-resistant?"

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Business
12:34 pm
Sun June 17, 2012

Land, Air And Rail — Summer Travel Has Its Hiccups

Summer travelers face higher gas prices and what seems like ever-increasing airfares.
Don Ryan AP

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 2:05 pm

Across the U.S., temperatures are creeping higher, kids are out of school and the days are longer. This can only mean that summer is upon us.

For many, summer also means travel season. Whether you're traveling by plane, train or automobile for that vacation, you're likely to feel the pinch of rising travel costs.

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London 2012: The Summer Olympics
12:01 pm
Sun June 17, 2012

Synch Or Swim: Olympic Duet Practices Togetherness

Mary Killman and Mariya Koroleva of the U.S. compete in the Olympic qualifiers in April in London. They'll compete together in the Olympics this summer.
Clive Rose Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 23, 2012 12:42 pm

For the first time ever, the U.S. synchronized swimming team didn't qualify for the Summer Olympics. But two of its members, who until recently knew each other only as rivals, are going to London to compete in synchronized swimming duets — against duets that have been together for years.

Mary Killman, 21, and Mariya Koroleva, 22, became roommates early last year, training with the national team in Indianapolis. Previously, they had competed against each other in the San Francisco Bay Area.

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Around the Nation
11:43 am
Sun June 17, 2012

One For The Road: Teen Builds Her Own Pontiac Fiero

14-year-old Kathryn DiMaria drilling door rivets in her Pontiac Fiero.
Courtesy of Jerry DiMaria

Originally published on Sat June 23, 2012 10:45 am

When 38-year-old Jerry DiMaria isn't on the clock at Central Michigan University, you can usually find him working on his Corvette.

"I guess I've always probably been a little bit into cars, but even as a kid I thought it would be a lot of fun to rebuild a car with my dad," he said.

He never got that chance with his dad, but now he's getting it with his oldest daughter, Kathryn.

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Arts & Life
11:03 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Chanticleer: A Botanical Distraction From Daily Life

Chanticleer is a historical estate and garden in Wayne, Pa., part of the old Main Line ring of estates around Philadelphia.
Courtesy of the Lyden family

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 10:19 am

Ever wanted to just disappear into a secret garden of earthly delights, of twists and turns of evocative ruin, exuberant tropics, the Zen of a Japanese teahouse?

Consider Chanticleer, in Wayne, Pa. It's part of the old Main Line ring of estates around Philadelphia. In fact, right across the street from the garden is the former home of Helen Hope Montgomery Scott, the heiress portrayed by Katherine Hepburn in Philadelphia Story.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
10:58 am
Sun June 17, 2012

The Movie Whoopi Goldberg's 'Seen A Million Times'

Gregory Peck won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his 1962 performance in To Kill a Mockingbird.
AP

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 8:59 am

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen a Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Author Interviews
10:56 am
Sun June 17, 2012

After War And Fame, Dad Is Author's Challenge

Anthony Swofford is the author of Jarhead: A Marine's Chronicle of the Gulf War and Other Battles, which was adapted into a film starring Jake Gyllenhaal as the author.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 2:47 am

Seven years ago, writer and former U.S. Marine Anthony Swofford had the success of a lifetime when his 2003 memoir Jarhead was turned into a high-budget Hollywood movie.

Swofford, then 35, had hit it big. But flush with cash and still grappling with post-war life, he suddenly found himself in the throes of a self-destructive rampage replete with drugs, alcohol and infidelity.

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The Two-Way
7:24 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Rodney King Dies At 47

Rodney King attends a book festival in Los Angeles in April. King was found unconscious in a swimming pool Sunday and later pronounced dead.
Katy Winn AP

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 1:38 am

Rodney King was found dead in the swimming pool at his home in Rialto, Calif., on Sunday, police said. He was 47.

King's beating by police in 1991 was caught on videotape and then sparked riots in Los Angeles when police accused of excessive force were acquitted.

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Music Interviews
7:03 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Kate McGarry: A Singer Inspired By The Spoken Word

Kate McGarry's new album is titled Girl Talk.
Matteo Trisolini

Originally published on Thu June 21, 2012 6:01 am

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The Two-Way
5:54 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Silenced Michigan State Rep To Perform 'Vagina Monologues' At State Capitol

Michigan State Rep. Lisa Brown (D-West Bloomfield).
Lisa Brown

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 5:55 am

The Michigan state representative who was barred from speaking during debates on the State House after comments that referenced her vagina, said that in protest she will perform "The Vagina Monolgues" on the steps of the Michigan state capitol.

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The Two-Way
3:20 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Greek Elections Could Decide The Country's Eurozone Future

Alexis Tsipras, leader of Syriza Party, casts his vote at a polling station in Athens, Greece.
Milos Bicanski Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 12:47 pm

It's official: The conservative New Democracy party that supports keeping Greece in the eurozone is the winner of Sunday's election in that country.

The victory is likely to ease some of the concerns over a potential Greek exit from the eurozone, and the implications of such a move on the fragile global economy.

After the victory, Antonis Samaras, the head of New Democracy, called for pro-euro coalition, one that would likely include the socialist PASOK party, which finished third. The radical left-wing Syriza party, which opposed the bailout, finished second.

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Middle East
2:45 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Close Race In Egyptian Candidates' Birthplace

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 8:23 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And we have one more election to talk about this morning, this one in Egypt. It's the second and last day of the presidential run-off there. Egyptians are choosing between the Muslim Brotherhood's candidate, Mohammed Morsi, and retired Air Force General Ahmed Shafiq, who was the last prime minister under ousted President Hosni Mubarak.

One region where the vote is expected to be particularly tight is in Egypt's Nile Delta, north of Cairo. That's where Kimberly Adams traveled and she filed this report.

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Europe
2:28 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Forecast For G-20: No Big Solutions

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 8:23 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Leaders of the world's biggest economies gather in Mexico this week for a two-day summit meeting. And while the backdrop is Baja, much of the attention will be on Europe. Economic troubles in the eurozone remain the biggest threat to the global economy though not the only one.

Joining us now to preview the G-20 meeting is NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley. Hi, Scott.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: Good to be with, Rachel.

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Sports
2:28 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Relishing The Heat, Never Cowering From Thunder

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 8:23 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFE IS A BALLGAME")

SISTER WINONA CARR: (Singing) Life is a ball game, being played each day...

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

If life is a ball game, then NPR's Mike Pesca is our man in Miami, relishing the heat, never cowering from the thunder. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Possibly setting fire to the rain, very good.

(LAUGHTER)

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Middle East
2:28 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Heading Into Iran Nuclear Talks, A Diplomatic Slump

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 8:23 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The up and down Iran nuclear talks appear to be in a down cycle as negotiators prepare to meet tomorrow in Moscow. Difficult talks in Baghdad last month were followed by contentious comments on both sides. And all this as new oil sanctions against Iran are due to take effect July 1st. NPR's Peter Kenyon has more from Moscow.

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Afghanistan
2:28 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Trip To Afghanistan Gives Uncertain Outlook

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 8:23 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Now, to the war in Afghanistan. NPR's Tom Bowman is just back from a month-long reporting trip in Afghanistan. He was out with U.S. troops and Afghan security forces trying to get a sense of how those Afghan forces are doing, since the U.S. is going to be bringing home more than 20,000 troops at the end of the summer. So, the question is: Will security gains last after the Americans leave? Tom is here in the studio to talk about what he saw. Good morning.

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Europe
2:28 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Eyes On Greece In Elections Redo

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 8:23 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

The eyes of Europe and global financial markets are on Greece today, where voters go to the polls in a re-run of the May elections that created a political stalemate. The vote could affect whether the debt-burdened country stays in the eurozone, or if it becomes the first member state to leave it.

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli joins us on the line from Athens. Good morning, Sylvia. You have been out at polling stations today, what are Greek voters saying?

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Europe
2:28 am
Sun June 17, 2012

France's New Leader Negotiates To Keep Promises

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 8:23 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

There is another important vote taking place in Europe today. The French go to the polls and they're expected to give a clear parliamentary majority to the new socialist president, Francois Hollande. There are high expectations for Hollande in both France and throughout Europe. And he may soon have carte blanche to implement his policies.

But as NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports, it won't be easy.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHILDREN TALKING)

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The Two-Way
2:14 am
Sun June 17, 2012

With Resignation, Egyptians Head To Polls For Second Round Of Voting

Egyptian men line up to vote at a polling station in the Shobra neighborhood of Cairo on Sunday.
Pete Muller AP

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 4:56 pm

Many in Egypt today stayed home. That enthusiasm and joy to be voting in a free election for the first time had given way to resignation, during the second round of presidential voting, which started yesterday.

That's the picture reports out of Egypt today are painting.

Perhaps that was most evident with Hussein, a Cairo taxi driver that Ahram, the Egyptian newspaper, spoke to at one of the polls.

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Media
12:47 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Like Good Bourbon, Magazine Is A Sip Of The South

David DiBenedetto, the editor-in-chief of Garden & Gun, holds an editorial meeting in the magazine's Charleston, S.C., offices.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 8:23 am

Garden & Gun magazine bills itself as the "Soul of the South." In five short years, the up-and-coming magazine has amassed a dedicated following and picked up critical acclaim.

The cover of the summer issue of Garden & Gun entices you to hit a Southern road. A smiling young woman in skinny white jeans, a straw hat and wayfarers tucked into her pocket appears ready to jump into a vintage red Mercedes roadster, top down — all under a bright Carolina blue sky.

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Presidential Race
12:46 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Campaign Ads Target Latinos As A Key Issue Looms

Daniella Urbina, a field organizer for President Obama in Denver, appears in a Spanish-language campaign ad.
YouTube

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 8:23 am

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Around the Nation
12:46 am
Sun June 17, 2012

States Stake Claim On Sir Francis Drake's Landing

Sir Francis Drake became the first British explorer to make contact with Native Americans.
Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 8:23 am

Oregon and California are locked in a dispute over something that happened 433 years ago, when Sir Francis Drake became the first British explorer to make contact with Native Americans.

It happened on what is now the American West Coast. The question is where? Oregon or California? The National Park Service is now poised to officially recognize one state's claim.

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World
12:44 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Racism Fears Hinder Soccer Tourney's Unity Message

Racist graffiti on a wall in the Ukrainian city of Lviv earlier this month. A recent BBC report warned of widespread racism in Ukraine and Poland, the hosts of the European soccer championship.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 2:56 pm

The European soccer championship is taking place for the first time in former East Bloc countries Ukraine and Poland. The tournament is supposed to highlight Europe's post-Cold War unity, but the age-old plagues of racism and nationalism persist.

Ukraine is home to a small number of Africans and Asians, many of whom came during the Soviet period. One prominent expatriate in Kiev is Charles Assante-Yeboa, president of the local Africa center.

Assante-Yeboa says four years ago, a group of Ukrainians wielding knives and clubs attacked him.

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Home Front: Soldiers Learn To Live After War
12:42 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Frontlines Of Fatherhood: Catching Up After War

Sgt. Michael Clark and his fiancee, Kaitlin Forant, hold their son, Michael Clark Jr. It took time for the 18-month-old to recognize his father after Clark's deployment.
Tom Dreisbach NPR

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 2:58 pm

Last year, members of the 182nd National Guard regiment marked Father's Day far away from their loved ones. This year, they're home with their kids after a year in Afghanistan.

Spc. Bryan Tolley, 29, knows the challenges of being both a soldier and a dad. His son, Ryan, is a shy, blond 18-month-old who happily clings to his dad.

"Seeing his face light up when he sees Dada come through his bedroom door instead of Mama — because he's so used to his mother — it's awesome. I love it," says Tolley of Plymouth, Mass.

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Presidential Race
12:41 am
Sun June 17, 2012

Raucous Iowa Convention May Signal What's To Come

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 8:10 am

You know things are going badly when the person at the front of the room has to say, "This is not going well." The fireworks at Iowa's Republican State Convention began even before lunchtime Saturday. At one point during the day, the parliamentarian threatened to kick out the next person who tried to speak out of order.

If Saturday's convention is any indication, Mitt Romney may not be in for smooth sailing at this summer's national convention in Florida.

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Around the Nation
12:30 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

State Of The Unions: Labor And The Middle Class

Occupy Wall Street protesters joined with unions in New York on May 1, a traditional day of global protests in sympathy with unions and leftist politics.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 4:05 pm

For many full-time employees in the United States, the five-day work week, paid overtime and holidays are expected benefits. This wasn't always so, and many workers' benefits today are the achievements of labor unions.

Just five decades ago, unions were on the frontline of the fight for the rights and wages of the middle class. But today, unions are on the decline.

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NPR Story
12:10 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

Gauging The Impact Of Obama's Immigration Policy

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 12:24 pm

President Obama announced major changes in the country's immigration policy on Friday. NPR's Mara Liasson talks with weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden about what the changes are and the political impact they may have this election season.

NPR Story
12:10 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

Egypt Faces Tense Election For New President

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 12:24 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

In Egypt, voters went to the polls today to pick a new president to replace Hosni Mubarak, who was ousted in a revolution last year. Voters are casting ballots just a few days after that nation's highest court issued a ruling that dissolves Egypt's first freely elected parliament, which was dominated by Islamists. The latest election is a runoff between an Islamist engineer and Mubarak's last prime minister, the two top vote-getters in the first round of presidential polls held last month.

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Arts & Life
11:23 am
Sat June 16, 2012

Embracing The Quirkiness Of Djuna Barnes

Before publishing the plays and novels she's now known for, women's rights advocate Djuna Barnes was a journalist and illustrator.
Djuna Barnes Papers, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 2:06 pm

A writer, illustrator and provocateur in the Roaring '20s, Djuna Barnes stood out.

"She was much more interested in embracing the quirky and embracing that idea that became so famous in feminist circles half a century later," Catherine Morris says, "the idea that the personal is political."

Morris is the curator of a new exhibition of Barnes' writings and illustrations called "Newspaper Fictions" at the Brooklyn Museum's Sackler Center for Feminist Art.

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Kee Facts: A Few Things You Didn't Know
7:15 am
Sat June 16, 2012

Follow The Money: On The Trail Of Watergate Lore

A photograph of the Watergate complex that was used as an exhibit in the trial of G. Gordon Liddy.
National Archives

"Follow the money" – a phrase that's now part of our national lexicon — was supposedly whispered to reporter Bob Woodward by Deep Throat as a way to cut through the lies and deceptions and find the truth about the Watergate scandal. The so-called third-rate burglary that happened 40 years ago this weekend ended the presidency of Richard Nixon. But did Mark Felt, the former associate director of the FBI who admitted to being Deep Throat in 2005, ever really say "follow the money"?

He did not.

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