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The Two-Way
8:27 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Former Va. Gov. Bob McDonnell, Wife Plead Not Guilty

Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell and his wife, Maureen, leave the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, on Friday in Richmond, Virginia.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell and his wife pleaded not guilty to corruption charges in front of a federal judge on Friday.

As we've reported, McDonnell and his wife, Maureen, have been charged with 14 counts, including conspiracy and wire fraud over allegations they took gifts from the CEO of a pharmaceutical company and in exchange provided Star Scientific with the "prestige of the governorship."

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The Two-Way
8:22 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Show Us: The State Of The Union Through Your Eyes

President Obama's motorcade en route to Capitol Hill for his the State of Union speech on January 25, 2011.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 2:03 pm

On Tuesday, President Obama will deliver his fifth State of the Union address.

He'll talk about the past year and he'll lay out his vision for the year to come.

For the occasion, we also want a ground-level feel of the state of the union. We want to see how the state of the union is playing out in your life.

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Shots - Health News
7:43 am
Fri January 24, 2014

When Elderly Are Hospitalized, Families Face Tough Decisions

Who will help make decisions when an older family member is hospitalized?
iStockphoto

It's never easy making medical choices for family members who are too sick to speak for themselves. But researchers say families of the elderly should be ready to do so.

When people over 65 end up in the hospital, about half of them eventually need someone else in the family to make decisions for them, according to findings published in the latest issue of JAMA Internal Medicine.

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It's All Politics
7:02 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Why Washington Drives Mayors Crazy

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 9:56 am

Along with hundreds of other cities across the country, Dubuque, Iowa, has been able to cut back on its utility bills, thanks to energy efficiency grants from the federal government.

But that money was part of the 2009 stimulus package. It's all dried up, and no more is forthcoming.

"We can't seem to get any traction in Congress to get it reinstated," says Dubuque Mayor Roy Buol.

Energy efficiency money isn't the only area where mayors have been frustrated in their dealings with Washington.

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The Two-Way
6:36 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Ukraine Protests Spread, But 'Fragile Truce' Holds In Kiev

On Friday in Kiev, a woman knelt as she appealed to Ukranian police troops at the site of clashes with anti-government protesters.
Gleb Garanich Reuters/Landov

"Violent protests in Ukraine have spread beyond the capital, Kiev," the BBC writes, as President Viktor Yanukovych and three key opposition leaders meet.

On Friday, according to the BBC, "protesters stormed the governor's offices in Lviv, and there were rallies in at least five more western cities."

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All Tech Considered
5:50 am
Fri January 24, 2014

As Windows XP Fades Away, Will Its Users Stick With Microsoft?

A man walks past a Microsoft billboard featuring Windows XP in November 2001 in Beijing.
Kevin Lee Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 5:10 am

Windows XP may have been largely developed in a different millennium, but it's not going into retirement without a fight.

Even as Microsoft promotes Windows 8, its latest operating system, Windows XP is still the second-most used OS on nonmobile computers, according to Net Applications web analytics. Debuting in 2001, XP lasted through three new Microsoft operating systems and the growth of mobile technology.

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The Salt
5:15 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Dry January: Giving Up Booze For A Month Does Have Benefits

Give your liver a break every now and then.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 7:37 am

As New Year's resolutions go, cutting back on food and drink are right at the top of the list. And while those resolved to change their eating habits may cut the carbohydrates or say a sweet goodbye to sugar, for regular drinkers, the tradition may involve what's known as a dry January: giving up booze for a month.

But could such a short-term breakup with alcohol really impart any measurable health benefits?

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The Two-Way
5:02 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Nadal Sweeps Federer To Advance To Australian Open Final

Rafael Nadal of Spain celebrates after defeating Roger Federer of Switzerland during their semifinal Friday at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne.
Aaron Favila AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 6:40 am

Rafael Nadal beat out rival Roger Federer to reach the Australian Open final for the third time in what The New York Times describes as "a breezy 7-6(4), 6-3, 6-3 win" Friday in Melbourne. Nadal will face No. 8-seeded Stan Wawrinka of Switzerland for the title.

The Times writes:

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The Two-Way
4:17 am
Fri January 24, 2014

President Boehner? Not If That Rules Out Wine And Cigarettes

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, during his appearance on Thursday's The Tonight Show with Jay Leno.
NBC.com/the-tonight-show

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:06 am

House Speaker John Boehner used his first-ever appearance on NBC-TV's The Tonight Show with Jay Leno to talk politics and, as President Obama and others have also done on late-night TV, have some fun at his own expense.

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The Two-Way
3:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

At Least 3 People Killed In 40-Vehicle Pileup In Indiana

Emergency crews work at the scene of a massive pileup Thursday involving more than 40 vehicles, many of them semitrailers, along Interstate 94.
AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 6:12 am

More than 40 vehicles, many of them semitrailers, were involved in a massive pileup on a slippery stretch of Interstate 94 in northwestern Indiana that killed at least three people and injured 23 others.

The accident occurred near Michigan City, Ind., about 60 miles from Chicago around 3:30 p.m. ET on Thursday.

The Associated Press reports:

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The Two-Way
3:12 am
Fri January 24, 2014

30 Elderly Residents Still Missing After Fire In Quebec

A firefighter walks past what is left of a seniors home in L'Isle Verte, Quebec. At least five people died and 30 are still missing after a fire there. The water used to fight the flames has frozen into ice that is a foot thick in places.
Mathieu Belanger Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 6:38 am

Eight people are known to have died and the families of about 30 others are "bracing for the worst" as the search resumes for victims of Thursday's fire at a home for senior citizens in eastern Quebec.

Correspondent Dan Karpenchuk says in a report for our Newscast Desk that:

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The Two-Way
2:10 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Mediator: Syria, Opposition Will Have Face-To-Face Meeting

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 8:48 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Deborah Amos reports from the Syria peace talks

Update at 12:36 p.m. ET. A Face-To-Face Meeting:

After arduous talks about talks, there seems to be some kind of breakthrough in Geneva, Switzerland, this afternoon: International mediator Lakhdar Brahimi said delegations from the Syrian government and its opposition will meet face-to-face for the first time on Saturday.

According to Reuters, Brahimi told reporters that both sides had accepted the principles of the Geneva Communiqué.

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The Two-Way
1:44 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Mobs Blame Muslim Brotherhood After Bombs Rock Cairo

A man carries an Egyptian police officer to an ambulance after Friday's blast at the Egyptian police headquarters in downtown Cairo.
Khalil Hamra AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 6:09 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo

Update at 11:05 a.m. ET: There's been a fourth blast in Cairo. We've added that development to the top of this post.

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Around the Nation
12:12 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Small Museum Shows Off Weird Objects

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 2:29 am

In this encore report, we hear about a small museum in an elevator shaft in lower Manhattan. It's only six feet square, and only about three or four people can enter it at a time. The exhibits document the weird and wonderful of modern life, including prison contraband made from bread. (This piece originally aired on Jan. 2, 2014 on All Things Considered).

Politics
12:12 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Boehner Picks Cathy McMorris Rodgers For GOP Rebuttal

Rep. Cathy McMorris-Rodgers, R-Wash., walks to a Sept. 2013 classified, members-only briefing on Syria in Washington.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:16 am

Tuesday night is the State of the Union Address — the biggest opportunity President Obama gets all year to speak to the American people about his priorities. There's also another speech that night — the GOP response. On Thursday, House Speaker John Boehner announced Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers from Washington State would deliver the official rebuttal.

Around the Nation
12:12 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Drinking Water Not Tested For Tens Of Thousands Of Chemicals

Al Jones of the West Virginia Department of General Services tests water as he flushes faucets and opens a rest room at the State Capitol in Charleston, W. Va., on Jan. 13, four days after a chemical spill into the Elk River. It wasn't until Jan. 21 that state officials were told by Freedom Industries that a second contaminant had also entered the river.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 3:48 pm

The fact that a second contaminant in West Virginia's drinking water eluded detection for nearly two weeks — despite intense testing of the water — reveals an important truth about how companies test drinking water: In most cases, they only find the contaminants they're looking for.

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All Tech Considered
10:55 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

At 30, The Original Mac Is Still An Archetype Of Innovation

A 1984 Apple Macintosh Classic was on display at the Museum for Art and Industry in Hamburg, Germany, in 2011.
Philipp Guelland dapd

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 2:58 am

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Shots - Health News
10:42 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Life-Support Battle Over Pregnant Texas Woman Heads To Court

Erick Munoz stands with an undated family photograph of himself, his wife, Marlise, and their son Mateo. Erick Munoz is now fighting to have a Texas hospital remove his pregnant wife from life support, saying she is brain-dead.
Courtesy Munoz Family MCT/Landov

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 3:38 am

The case of the Texas woman, 22 weeks pregnant and being kept on life-support machines at a Forth Worth hospital against her husband's wishes, goes before a judge in North Texas on Friday.

Marlise Munoz has been on respirators and ventilators since she was found unconscious in her home in November, when she was 14 weeks pregnant.

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StoryCorps
10:41 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Giving Thanks For Two Bonus Decades Of Life And Love

Lionel D'Luna, daughter Adrienne and wife Debra remember their daughter and sister Alexis, who died in 2012 of complications from CHARGE syndrome.
Courtesy of the D'Luna Family

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 6:23 am

Alexis D'Luna was born with CHARGE syndrome, a life-threatening genetic condition. She was intellectually disabled, legally blind, had hearing problems and stood just under 5 feet tall because of deformities in her legs and back.

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Planet Money
10:40 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

When A $65 Cab Ride Costs $192

Update: Several readers commented on the route shown in the map above. Lisa Chow took the car for purposes of this story, and chose a route that began and ended near NPR's New York offices.
Lisa Chow

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:37 am

I was in the car for about an hour, rolling around Manhattan in the middle of a snowstorm. The ride normally would have cost me $65. But when it came time to pay, my driver, Kirk Furye, was concerned for me.

"Are you going to get in trouble with NPR?" he asked. "You are almost at three times the [normal] amount."

Final cost of a one-hour cab ride: $192.00.

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Parallels
10:35 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Russians Fear A Sochi Legacy Of 'Black Widows,' Not Gold Medals

Shoppers at a department store in Sochi, Russia, pass an information banner with photos of suspected terrorists wanted by police. The color photo shows Ruzanna Ibragimova, the 22-year-old widow of an insurgent. Police say she has been spotted in recent days in central Sochi.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 3:51 pm

Two weeks before the Winter Olympics, Russian security forces are reportedly searching for potential suicide bombers, at least one of whom may already be in the host city of Sochi.

The suspects are thought to be linked to Islamist militants who are fighting to throw off Russian control and create a fundamentalist Muslim state in Russia's North Caucasus Mountains.

Police have been circulating leaflets at hotels in Sochi, warning about women who may be part of a terrorist plot.

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It's All Politics
10:33 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

8 Republicans And A Nunn Battle For Georgia's Open Senate Seat

The race for Georgia's U.S. Senate seat started to take shape Monday as Michelle Nunn, a Democrat, announced plans to run for her father's old seat, joining a crowded field of Republican contenders.
Kevin Wolf AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 8:12 am

Georgia Republican Saxby Chambliss won't be seeking a third term in the U.S. Senate this year, and his decision to bow out has eight other Republicans, including three congressmen, scrambling for his seat.

Democrats, meanwhile, have their hopes pinned on the daughter of a well-known and widely admired former senator. It's turned a Senate race Republicans hoped would be a cakewalk into something far less predictable.

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Economy
2:09 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Study: Upward Mobility No Tougher In U.S. Than Two Decades Ago

The study did reveal widespread disparity in upward mobility based on geography. For those hoping to climb the economic ladder, San Francisco is one of the best places to live, the study found.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 12:32 pm

A new study finds that contrary to widespread belief, it's no harder to climb the economic ladder in the United States today than it was 20 years ago.

But the study did find that moving up that ladder is still a lot more difficult in the U.S. than in other developed countries.

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The Edge
2:05 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

A Baby Didn't Bump These Moms Out Of Competition

Malaysian shooting athlete Nur Suryani Taibi was eight months pregnant in 2012 as she prepared for the Summer Olympics in London.
Rebecca Blackwell AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 12:32 pm

Let's be clear: Olympians handle the physical challenges of childbirth differently than most of the rest of us.

Aretha Thurmond is a discus thrower who'd already competed in two Olympics when she went to the hospital in labor.

"So I get there and they're like, 'Yeah, whatever, you're 4 centimeters dilated. Go walk around the hospital and come back,' " she says.

Thurmond's hospital was part of a university, so she headed straight for its track, where she power-walked for the next two hours. Then the school's discus throwers came out.

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All Tech Considered
12:53 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Retailers Can Wait To Tell You Your Card Data Have Been Compromised

The security breaches at Target and Neiman Marcus have raised questions over how quickly companies are required to disclose that customer information was hacked.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 12:32 pm

You might think that retailers have to let you know right away if they get hacked and someone steals your account information.

But recent disclosures by Target and Neiman Marcus that their networks were hacked, and data about their consumers were stolen, have raised questions about how quickly merchants need to alert their customers.

In the case of Neiman Marcus, the company may have had evidence of a breach as far back as July. But the law is a bit murky on just how quickly companies need to let customers know.

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Europe
12:53 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

At The Barricades In Kiev, A City Seethes

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 12:32 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

In Ukraine, antigovernment protests turned deadly this week. Yesterday, two men were shot in the capital of Kiev during battles with police. The protests have spread to other cities, notably in the western part of the country.

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Economy
12:53 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

What Do Americans Think About Income Inequality?

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 12:32 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And as we just heard from Jim, economic mobility may not have changed much in the last 20 years, but income inequality has skyrocketed. More on the latter now from Michael Dimock, vice president of research at the Pew Research Center. Pew has a new survey out, asking Americans what they think about income inequality.

Michael Dimock, welcome once again.

MICHAEL DIMOCK: Thanks for having me.

SIEGEL: And first finding is Americans say there is growing income inequality, yes?

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The Two-Way
12:48 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Rat-Infested Ghost Ship Might Be Heading For U.K.

The Lyubov Orlova sits derelict at dockside in Newfoundland in October 2012.
Dan Conlin Wikipedia Commons

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 1:31 pm

A ghost ship full of diseased, cannibalistic rats could be nearing landfall somewhere in the British Isles.

No, it's not the plot for a new horror film. According to The Independent, the 300-foot cruise liner Lyubov Orlova, which has been drifting, crewless, around the North Atlantic for nearly a year since it snapped its towline en route to the scrapyard, might be moving east toward the English coast.

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The Edge
12:47 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Welcome To The Edge: NPR's Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics Blog

Olympic Park in the Russian Black Sea resort of Sochi. NPR will bring you the most interesting things we see and learn from the 2014 Winter Olympics. The first events are on Feb. 6, one day before the opening ceremony.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 8:25 am

Today marks the start of The Edge, a blog hosting NPR's coverage of the Sochi Winter Games. The Edge is about the journeys Olympic athletes take to get better. From skaters to skiers, no two journeys are alike. But they all end at the same place: in competition. And many of them are fascinating.

As we've prepared for the games that begin Feb. 6 — in just two weeks — NPR has been following many stories of athletes and equipment, of money and security.

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It's All Politics
12:21 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Virginia Gay Marriage Shift Generates Sharp Response

Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring speaks at the Virginia Capitol in Richmond on Dec. 18. Herring's announcement Thursday generated strong partisan responses.
Steve Helber AP

Political reaction to Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring's announcement Thursday that he won't defend the state's ban on same-sex marriage was strong and swift — and fell squarely along party lines.

Herring told Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep that he had concluded the 2006 constitutional amendment is inconsistent with the U.S. Constitution.

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